billsportsmaps.com

January 22, 2017

2016-17 FA Cup 4th Round, map and attendance list with fixtures./+ The biggest upset in the 3rd Round – Lincoln City 1-0 Ipswich Town (replay from Tuesday 17 January 2017)./+ update: biggest Cup-upset-winners in the 4th Round (Sutton Utd, Lincoln City, Millwall, Wolves, Oxford Utd).

Filed under: 2016-17 FA Cup — admin @ 4:25 pm

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2016-17 FA Cup 4th Round, map and attendance list with fixtures




Links…
-The competition…FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-Fixtures, results, etc…FA CUP: 4th Round: fixtures/teams (us.soccerway.com/national/england/fa-cup).
-BBC’s page on the FA Cup…FA Cup (bbc.com/sport/football/fa-cup).
-FA Cup 2016-17 4th Round Preview (facupfactfile.wordpress.com).
-With Lincoln on the FA Cup trail: from 4.20am ticket queues to toilet trouble
Non-league Lincoln face Brighton in the fourth round having knocked out another Championship team, Ipswich. A day behind the scenes with management, players and fans uncovers a club and city with their buzz back
(on 27 Jan.2017 by Andy Hunter at theguardian.com/football).

By Bill Turianski on 22 January 2017; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

    Updates on the 28th & 29th of January 2017: biggest Cup-upsets in the 4th Round

Biggest upsets of the 2016-17 FA Cup 4th Round…
Sutton United over Leeds United [difference of 84 league places], Lincoln City over Brighton & Hove Albion [difference of 72 league places], Millwall over Watford [difference of 40 league places], Wolverhampton Wanderers over Liverpool at Anfield [difference of 34 league places], Oxford United over Newcastle United [difference of 34 league places].
2016-17_fa-cup_4th-round_upset-wins_upset-draws_jan-28-2017_lincoln-city_oxford-utd_wolves_sutton-utd_millwall_d_.gif

    The biggest upset in the 3rd Round – Lincoln City 1-0 Ipswich Town (replay from Tuesday 17 January 2017)…

-Video highlights, Lincoln City 1-0 Ipswich Town | 17 Jan 2017 (3:42 video at youtube.com)

The biggest upset of the 3rd Round was in a replay, on Tuesday night the 17th of January 2017, when Non-League side Lincoln City beat League-Championship-side Ipswich Town one-nil. Attendance at Sincil Bank in Lincoln was a full-capacity crowd of 9,054. Lincoln City (a 5th division-club) were 59 league places and 3 divisions lower than Ipswich Town (a 2nd-tier side currently in 14th place there). The lone goal was scored by former Grimsby Town striker Nathan Arnold in the 91st minute (see screenshots and photos in illustration further below). Lincoln City thus advances to the 4th Round for the first time since 1976 (when the just-departed Graham Taylor was manager). For the 4th round, the Red Imps of Lincolnshire have been given a plum tie, at home versus second-division high-fliers Brighton & Hove Albion.

Lincoln City’s excellent season under their new young manager Danny Cowley continues on…
-From the Guardian from 17 Jan.2017, Lincoln City manager Danny Cowley proud of FA Cup ‘win for the people’ (by Steve Madeley at theguardian.com/football).
-From the official Lincon City website, THE MANAGEMENT TEAM (redimps.co.uk/team/gaffer).
Danny Cowley has absolutely revitalised Lincoln City. Cowley is a 37-year-old who was formerly the manager of two small-and-now-overachieving Essex-based clubs. First with now-6th-tier-side Concord Rangers (from 2007 to 2015, which included 3 promotions from the 9th level to the 6th level), and then Cowley had one year at the helm of 5th-tier-side Braintree Town (last season in 2015-16, when Braintree finished in 3rd place in the 5th division). Lincoln City are a former Football League club with 104 seasons in the League (last in 2010-11), as well as an all-time-most five demotions/relegations back into Non-League Football (in 1908, in 1911, in 1920, in 1987, and in 2011). In all but the last of these (2011), Lincoln City had returned to the Football League the following season. But for the last 5 seasons (from 2011-12 to 2015-16), the club had been mired in the lower-half of the Conference/National League table, with no real hope in sight of getting back into the League. And Lincoln City’s attendances had dropped off from 5.1 K ten years ago, to just 2.5 K last season {Football League attendances}. But that has changed now, and Lincoln City under Cowley lead the National League table by 4 points, currently. And Lincoln City have now had their best Cup-run in four decades (since they last made it to the FA Cup 4th Round, back in 1975-76). And Lincoln City’s crowd-size has increased by about 1.4 K, to 3.9 K now {National League table/attendances here}. Their ground, Sincil Bank, was swelled to 9-thousand capacity for the 3rd round replay on 17th January versus Ipswich Town. Now Lincoln City will host Brighton in the 4th round (on Saturday 28th January 2017), and the 122-year-old Sincil Bank will certainly be sold-out again. If the Red Imps can handle the Seagulls and pull off another Cup-upset, they will have made it to the 5th Round for the first time in 130 years. The last time Lincoln City made it to the 5th round was all the way back in 1887, when the club, which was established in 1883, had only been in existence for 4 years. In that match 130 years ago, Lincoln City lost 3-0 to Rangers FC, in Glasgow, way back in the FA Cup’s early days when Scottish teams were allowed to play in the competition {1887 FA Cup/Fifth Round}.

Below: Lincoln City 1-0 Ipswich Town (2016-17 FA Cup 3rd Round replay)…
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Photo and Image credits above –
Photo of Lincoln Cathedral, photo by Getty Images via thetimes.co.uk/travel. Photo of street in Lincoln by a canal, with Lincoln Cathedral in background, photo by YTFC independent site ciderspace.co.uk/[match gallery 23 May 2004, Lincoln City 2-3 Yeovil Town (3rd Div match)]. Photo from June 2015: Lincoln Cathedral (in background) seen from a stream adjacent to the Sincil Bank ground, photo by clivecatton.co.uk; also see clivecatton.co.uk/tag/lincoln-city-football-club/. Photo of minutes applause in the memory of former Lincoln City player-and-manager Graham Taylor, photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images via theguardian.com. Screenshots (3) of Sincil Bank and of the lead-up to the winning goal, images from video uploaded by ByShowtime at youtube.com. Photo of Nathan Arnold about to score, photo unattributed at sportstarlive.com/football/fa-cup-review-nonleague-lincoln-stuns-ipswich. Photo of Danny Cowley celebrating with coaches and players, photo by Reuters via irishmirror.ie. Photo of Lincoln City players celebrating with fans after victory, photo by Getty Images via dailymail.co.uk/football.

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Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.

-Current average attendance figures from Soccerway.com.

Thanks to @FACupFactfile for following @billsportsmaps on Twitter.

January 11, 2017

Mexico: Liga MX (1st division fútbol), location-map for 2016-17, with average attendances & percent-capacities from the 2016-Apertura, plus all-time Mexican 1st division titles list.

Filed under: Mexico: Fútbol — admin @ 9:38 pm

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Liga MX (the Mexican 1st division in fútbol), location-map for 2016-17, with average attendances from the 2016-Apertura, and titles listed




Links…
-Teams, etc…2016-17 Liga MX season (en.wikipedia).
-Liga MX official site (in Spanish)…ligamx.net.

By Bill Turianski on 11 January 2017; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Titles list…
56 clubs have competed in the Mexican 1st division since its founding in 1943-44. Club América, of Mexico City, have won the title a record 12 times (last in the 2014-Apertura). Second-most titles belong to Chivas Guadalajara, with 11 titles (but none in over a decade, last in the 2006-Apertura). Third-most titles have been won by Toluca, with 10 titles (last in the 2010-Bicentario). The titles list is then followed by…Cruz Azul (with 8 titles), then León and Pumas UNAM (with 7 titles), and then Pachuca (with 6 titles). The current league champions are Tigres UANL, who, on Christmas Day 2016, won their 5th title in the 2016-Apertura tournament, beating Club America 2-2 (aet) aggregate/3-0 penalties, in a thrilling Finals. {See this article with video that shows the equalizing goal by Tigres in the 119th minute, El Volcan erupts as Tigres deny America title in wild final (by Jon Arnold at goal.com on 25th Dec. 2016).}

Attendance in the Mexican 1st division…
Liga MX draws very well. Look at it this way…these days, the Mexican top flight has better attendance than Serie A in Italy, and Ligue Un in France. Liga MX drew 26,600 per game, overall, in the 2016-Apertura, and Liga MX drew 26,262 last season (2015-Apertura/2016-Clausura season, see figures at side-bar here). That means Liga MX is currently the fourth-best drawing association football league in the world.

Using most-recent (2015-16) full-season overall gate figures, here is the breakdown of the top 7-drawing association football leagues…
#1: Bundesliga (Germany), at 43.3 K.
#2: Premier League (England/Wales), at 34.6 K.
#3: La Liga (Spain), at 28.5 K.
#4: Liga MX (Mexico), at 26.2 K.
#5: Serie A (Italy), at 22.1 K.
#6: MLS (USA/Canada), at 21.6 K.
#7: Ligue 1 (France/Monaco), at 20.8 K.
Sources:
European-Football-Statistics.co.uk/[attendance];
2016-17 Liga MX season/Attendance (en.wikipedia.org).
Major League Soccer attendance/Season averages (en.wikipedia.org).

And finally, there is actual reporting of attendance figures in Mexico, as the official site of Liga MX now publishes gate figures {see this}. There are quite a few good-drawing teams in Mexican fútbol. Both Monterrey teams – Tigres de UANL and CF Monterrey – draw over 40 K, and lead the pack. This despite the fact that Monterrey is just the 3rd-largest city in Mexico (Guadalajara is second-biggest city, and Mexico City is, of course, the biggest city in Mexico). Club América of Mexico City are 3rd-best-drawing, at 39 K. Then follows both Guadalajara teams, with Atlas at 34 K and then Chivas at 33 K. Sixth-best crowd-size, at 26.9 K, belongs to a relatively new club, Club Tijuana (aka Xolos), who are just a decade old (est. 2007). Yet already, Club Tijuana has a title under their belt, as well as a fervent and growing fanbase, one which swells their 27-K-capacity stadium to near-100-percent capacity. Club Tijuana gets decent support from southern California, too (like a couple-thousand per game crossing the border to root for the Xolos). And that brings us to another example of how good support for Mexican 1st division football is these days…2 teams are playing to standing-room only (Tigres UANL and Toluca), and three more teams are playing to over 93-percent-capacity (Tijuana, Monterrey, and Pachuca).
___
Thanks to all at the following -
-Blank map of Mexico, by Sémhur at commons.wikimedia.org: File:Mexico States blank map.svg.
-Blank map of Greater Mexico City, by Yavidaxiu at commons.wikimedia.org: File:Zona Metropolitana de México.svg.
Black globe-map-with-Mexico-shown (orthographic map), by Addicted04 at commons.wikimedia.org: File:MEX orthographic.svg.
-Attendance, from official Liga MX site {here}, via en.wikipedia.org at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016%E2%80%9317_Liga_MX_season#Attendance.

January 3, 2017

2016-17 FA Cup 3rd Round, map and attendance list with fixtures./+ Stourbridge FC, the lowest-placed club still alive in the tournament (for the second-straight round)./+Update: biggest Cup-upsets and Cup-draws in the round.

Filed under: 2016-17 FA Cup — admin @ 2:54 pm

2016-17_fa-cup_3rd-round_location-map_64-clubs_w-current-attendances-in-leagues_w-fixtures_post_b_.gif
2016-17 FA Cup 3rd Round, map and attendance list with fixtures




Links…
-The competition…FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-3rd Round: fixtures/teams… (us.soccerway.com/national/england/fa-cup).
-BBC’s page on the FA Cup…FA Cup (bbc.com/sport/football/fa-cup).
-FA Cup Factfile’s 2016-17 FA Cup 3rd Round Tie-by-Tie Preview (facupfactfile.wordpress.com).
-Faces behind the FA Cup third round: ‘At this level these are the days you live for’ (by Louise Taylor, Nick Miller and Michael Butler at theguardian.com/football on 6 Jan. 2017).
-FA Cup third round: 10 things to look out for this weekend (by Greg Bakowski and John Ashdown at theguardian/football on 6 Jan, 2017).

By Bill Turianski on 3 January 2017; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Update…as per the league tables, here are the teams who had the biggest Cup-upset(s) & Cup-draws of the 3rd round (Millwall, Plymouth Argyle, Lincoln City, Blackpool, Sutton United)…
2016-17_fa-cup_3rd-round_upset-wins_upset-draws_jan2017_e_.gif

The map…
The map shows the 64 clubs who have qualified for the 2016-17 FA Cup Third Round Proper. Also on the map page is the 3rd Round fixture list, and there is a list of the 64 clubs’ current home league average attendances (well, somewhat current: attendance figures to 1 Jan. 2017).

The 3rd Round is when teams from the top two divisions of English football join the competition…
In the 3rd Round, the 20 clubs from the Premier League, and the 24 clubs from the Football League Championship enter the competition. Included with those 44 teams are the last 20 teams still alive from all the 5 Qualifying Rounds and the 2 earlier Rounds. This season that breaks down to 5 Non-League teams still alive, as well as 19 teams from the lower two divisions of the Football League (Leagues One and Two).

The lowest-placed of those 5 Non-League teams that have qualified is West Midlands-based Stourbridge FC (see short write-up and illustration below). The other 4 Non-League teams still alive in the competition are all from the 5th-division/National League: Barrow AFC (of coastal Cumbria, up in the north-west of England), Eastleigh FC (of Greater Southampton, down in the south of England in coastal Hampshire), Lincoln City FC (the highest-placed Non-League club, currently, and hailing from Lincolnshire), and Sutton United FC (a club traditionally considered as from Surrey, but now officially situated in the southern edge of Greater London).

The lowest-placed team still alive in the competition, for the second straight round, is West Midlands-based Stourbridge FC…
-From the Guardian/football…Stourbridge reach FA Cup third round for first time with Northampton win (by Press Association via theguardian.com from 13 Dec. 2016).
-From the West-Midlands-based Express and Star…FA Cup shock: Stourbridge 1 Northampton Town 0 – So, where were you, BBC? And where were you, BT Sport? (expressandstar.com/sport).
-See the highlights hereStourbridge 1-0 Northampton Town – Emirates FA Cup 2016/17 (R2) | Goals & Highlights (1:59 video uploaded by FATV at youtube.com).

7th-level-side Stourbridge beat 3rd-division-side Northampton Town 1-0, at their War Memorial Athletic Ground, on a chilly Tuesday night in the Black Country, in front of a solid crowd of 2,520, in a game which had been rescheduled from 9 days earlier, due to an icy pitch. University student/part-time bartender Jack Duggan (then-aged 23) scored the winner for Stourbridge in the 85th minute, after a goal-mouth-scramble saw the ball drop in front of Duggan, who fired home from close range. Duggan couldn’t celebrate too much with his teammates after the match, because he had university classes the next morning. It was a true giant-killing, seeing as how Stourbridge were placed 4 divisions and 89 league-places below Northampton. Plus Northampton manager Gary Pope had paid enough respect to Stourbridge to field a virtually unchanged lineup from the Cobblers’ previous weekend’s league fixture.

Stourbridge FC are in the Northern Premier League, and are from the town of Stourbridge, which is situated about 11 miles west of central Birmingham. {Note: I wrote a bit more in-depth about Stourbridge, including an illustration, in my 2nd-round-post, here.} Owing to the cut-glass industry traditionally associated with the town, Stourbridge FC are known as the Glassboys. Stourbridge (est. 1876) will be making their 3rd Round debut in the 2016-17 FA Cup. Led by local-born manager Gary Hackett, who has been manager since 2003, Stourbridge have been lower-Non-League-Cup-specialists these last 8 seasons. In that time-period, Stourbridge have qualified for the FA Cup 1st Round 5 times, the 2nd Round 4 times, and now the Glassboys are into the rarefied air of the 3rd Round, after beating Northampton. And Stourbridge have a decent chance of advancing to the 4th Round, because, for the 3rd Round, they have been drawn against a 4th-division side – Wycombe Wanderers – who, though playing well (and are in 5th place in League Two, currently), are essentially a 3rd/4th-division yo-yo club, and very well might be prioritizing another promotion-run, over a Cup-run. Stourbridge will travel the 83 miles south-east to Adams Park in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, on Saturday the 7th of January, to face Wycombe Wanderers. Stourbridge will be taking 2,200 supporters there.

Below: 2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round. Tuesday, 13 December 2016. War Memorial Athletic Ground, Stourbridge, West Midlands.
Stourbridge 1-0 Northampton Town…
stourbridge-fc_war-memorial-athletic-ground_stourbridge_1-0_northampton_13-dec-2016_2016-17-fa-cup_2-r_jack-duggan_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above –
3 screenshots from youtube video, Stourbridge 1-0 Northampton Town – Emirates FA Cup 2016/17 (R2) | Goals & Highlights (uploaded by FATV at youtube.com). Shot of stoked-up Stourbridge supporters at the match, photo by PA Wire via itv.com/news. Shot of Jack Duggan banging the goal home, photo by Reuters via bournemouthfootball.net/stourbridge-1-0-northampton-town. Manager Gary Hackett congratulating Jack Duggan, photo by Express and Star at expressandstar.com/sport/2016/12/13/stourbridge-1-northampton-town-report/stourbridge-v-northampton-town-fa-cup-second-round-replay-the-war-memorial-athletic-ground.

The 6 televised matches do not include any of the 5 Non-League teams (not even Sutton United v AFC Wimbledon)…
None of the 5 Non-League clubs’ matches will be televised, although two 4th division clubs’ matches will be broadcast – Plymouth Argyle away to Liverpool on the Sunday, and Cambridge Utd hosting Leeds Utd on the Monday. The other four matches being televised all involve 1st or 2nd division clubs: West Ham v Man City on the Friday, Man U v Reading early on the Saturday, Preston North End v Arsenal for the late Saturday match, and Spurs v Aston Villa for the late Sunday match. Stourbridge will be taking 2,200 fans {see this article from the Guardian/football, Faces behind the FA Cup third round: ‘At this level these are the days you live for’ (by Louise Taylor, Nick Miller and Michael Butler at theguardian/football on Friday 6 Jan. 2016)}.

So, the powers that be seem to have decided that the magic of the Cup, while still perhaps in existence, does not necessarily apply to the minnows, once the big clubs join the party. I would rant about it, but I am sort of ranted-out. Besides, I couldn’t say it any better than FA Cup Factfile did, in a tweet, where he methodically ticks off the reasons why all 5 of the matches involving Non-League clubs – especially Sutton United versus AFC Wimbledon – deserve to be televised (see embedded tweet below)

.
___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.

-Current average attendance figures from Soccerway.com.
-Current average attendance for lower Non-League club (7th Level), at non-league-matters.co.uk.

Thanks to @FACupFactfile for following @billsportsmaps on Twitter.

December 30, 2016

NCAA Division I Hockey: Hockey East conference: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & NCAA D1-hockey titles listed.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey,NCAA, ice- Hockey East — admin @ 3:46 pm

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NCAA Division I Hockey: Hockey East conference: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & NCAA D1-hockey titles listed



By Bill Turianski on 30 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-Conferences…Division I in ice hockey.
-Teams in Hockey East, etc…Hockey East (en.wikipedia.org).
-My recent post of D1-hockey (map with all 60 teams & 2015-16 attendance.

Conference-maps for NCAA Division I (aka D1) men’s ice hockey
(Note: already-posted D1-hockey conference maps are linked-to, below.)
I have made a location-map for each of the 6 D1-hockey conferences, which are…
Atlantic Hockey Association (11 teams/est. 1998-99/ zero titles).
Big Ten Conference hockey (6 teams [7-teams in 2017-18]/est. 2013-14/ 23 titles won amongst its six teams).
ECAC Hockey (12 teams/est. 1961-62/ 7 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
∙Hockey East Association (12 teams [11 teams in 2017-18]/est. 1984-85/ 13 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (aka NCHC) (8 teams/est. 2013-14/ 18 titles won amongst its eight teams).
Western Collegiate Hockey Association (aka WCHA) (10 teams/est. 1951-52/ 8 titles won amongst its ten teams).


The location-map here shows the 12-team Hockey East conference.
The Hockey East conference has teams spread throughout the 6 New England states, plus Notre Dame in Indiana – but Notre Dame will be leaving the Hockey East conference after the 2016-17 season, to join Big Ten Conference hockey {for that, see my post on Big Ten conference hockey}.

Once Notre Dame leaves (after 2016-17), Hockey East will once again be based entirely in the New England states…
Hockey East has 6 teams from Massachusetts. One is based in the central region of the state: UMass (of Amherst, MA/which is 75 miles west of Boston). 5 teams are based in the College-hockey-Mecca of Greater Boston…with Boston University and Northeastern in Boston, proper; and 3 teams in Greater Boston…Boston College (of Chestnut Hill, MA/6 miles west of downtown Boston), UMass-Lowell (of Lowell, MA/23 miles north), and Merrimack College [of North Andover/33 miles north of the Hub]). One team is located in Vermont (Vermont [of Burlington, VT, which is on the eastern side of Lake Champlain]). One team is located in New Hampshire (UNH or New Hampshire [of Durham, NH, which is just east of Manchester, NH and is a few miles inland from Portsmouth, NH, and is 54 miles north of Boston]). One team is located in Maine (Maine [of Orono, ME, which is 115 miles north-east and inland from Portland, ME]). One team is located in Rhode Island (Providence [of Providence, RI, which is 41 miles south of Boston]). And one team is located in Connecticut (UConn – aka Connecticut [of Storrs, CT, with the team playing home games 26 miles west in Hartford, CT]).

The map
The map is based on my recently-posted 60-team NCAA D1-hockey location-map {see it here}. The 12 Hockey East teams’ crests, colors and locations are shown on the map. Each team’s color-circle, which radiates out from their location-dot, is sized to represent average attendance…the larger the circle, the higher the team’s average attendance. Crowd-size-rank within the 60-team-D1 is also noted – by the number next to the team-name on the map and on the attendance-list. (North Dakota is the highest-drawing D1-hockey team, currently.)

The chart at the right side of the map page shows attendance data. Along with average attendances of the Hockey East teams (2015-16 home regular season figures), arena sizes and percent-capacities are listed. Also shown, below the attendance data, is a list showing all D1-hockey titles which have been won by teams that currently play in the conference (in this case, all titles won by teams in Hockey East). Finally, at the lower-right of the map-page is a chart showing all D1-hockey teams’ titles and Frozen Four appearances (39 of the 60 D1-hockey teams).

Hockey East was established in 1984-85…
Hockey East was formed in 1984-85, by five former ECAC teams: the Boston College Eagles, the Boston University Terriers, the New Hampshire Wildcats, the Northeastern Huskies, and the Providence Friars. These 5 decided to create their own league, because of scheduling concerns (they feared that the Ivy League teams in the ECAC would form their own conference, but that never came about). It also cannot be denied that the Hockey East set-up has decreased travel costs among its member-teams (seeing as it is basically a New-England-only-based conference). Before Hockey East’s inaugural season started in the fall of 1984, two more teams joined the new conference: the Maine Black Bears and the UMass-Lowell River Hawks. The Merrimack Warriors joined Hockey East in 1989-90. The UMass Minutemen joined Hockey East in 1994-95. The Vermont Catamounts joined Hockey East in 2005-06. And the UConn Huskies joined in 2014-15.

Of the top 20-drawing D1-hockey teams, 7 are from Hockey East.
#8-best-drawing UMass-Lowell River Hawks draw in the mid-5-K-range (5,592 per game and at a solid 93.2 percent-capacity in their 6-K-capacity arena). UConn draws 5.1K, Boston College draws 4.9 K, New Hampshire draws 4.8 K, Boston University draws 4.3 K, and Maine (the 20th-highest drawing D1-hockey team), draws 3.9 K. (Note: soon-to-be-departed-for-the-Big-Ten Notre Dame also draws in the top 20, at 4.9 K in their 5.0-K-capacity arena, for a very good 94.6 percent-capacity.) One other note: Providence and Vermont both play to some of the best percent-capacities in D1-hockey…2015 champs Providence basically play to sold-out crowds these days, drawing 2.9 K in their 3.0-K-capacity arena at 98.3 percent-capacity; while Vermont is 21st-highest-drawing D1-hockey team at 3.8 K in their 4.0-K-capacity arena, for an outstanding 95.7 percent-capacity.

In the 32 seasons since Hockey East was formed, there have been 9 D1-hockey titles won by Hockey East teams.
Those 9 titles have been won by 4 teams…the Boston College Eagles, with 4 [of their 5] D1 titles won as a Hockey East team (in 2001, 2008, 2012, and 2014); the Maine Black Bears, with both of their D1 titles won as a Hockey East team (in 1993 and 1999), the Boston University Terriers, with 2 [of their 5] D1 titles won as a Hockey East team (in 1995 and 2009); and the Providence Friars, who won their first D1-hockey title two seasons ago in 2015. So, that means Hockey East has won 28 percent of the last 32 D1-hockey titles, since its inception. That shows you that Hockey East is one of the elite D1-hockey conferences.

Hockey East has also produced 14 other D1-championship-game-finalists. As far as Final Four appearances go, 9 of the 12 Hockey East teams have made it to the Final Four at least once, with Boston College having made the most Final Four appearances of all the D1-hockey teams: 25 times, including last year (2016). Boston University also has a large number of Final Four appearances: 22 (last in 2015). To round out the rest…Maine has made 11 Final Four appearances (last in 2007). New Hampshire has made 7 Final Four appearances (last in 2003). Providence has made 4 Final Four appearances (last in 2015). Vermont has made 2 Final Four appearances (last in 2009). U-Mass Lowell made a Final Four appearance in 2014. And Northeastern made a Final Four appearance in 1982. (Notre Dame has made 2 Frozen Four appearances (last in 2011).)
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of several teams (Wisconsin, Minnesota-Duluth, Cornell, Maine, Minnesota State, Vermont, Yale, UMass, Western Michigan, Canisius College, American International), such as at File:ECAC-Uniform-Cornell.png.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2015-2016 (uscho.com).

December 26, 2016

NCAA Division I Hockey: Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA): attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & D1-hockey titles listed.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey,NCAA, ice- Western (WCHA) — admin @ 9:53 pm

ncaa_ice-hockey_wchc-conference_attendance-map_2015-16_16-teams_post_b_.gif

NCAA Division I Hockey: Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA): attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & D1-hockey titles listed




By Bill Turianski on 26 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
Conferences…Division I in ice hockey.
WCHA teams, etc…Western Collegiate Hockey Association (en.wikipedia.org).

Conference-maps for NCAA Division I (aka D1) men’s ice hockey
(Note: already-posted D1-hockey conference maps are linked-to, below.)
I am making a location-map for each of the 6 D1-hockey conferences, which are…
Atlantic Hockey Association (11 teams/est. 1998-99/ zero titles).
Big Ten Conference hockey (6 teams [7-teams in 2017-18]/est. 2013-14/ 23 titles won amongst its six teams).
ECAC Hockey (12 teams/est. 1961-62/ 7 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
∙Hockey East Association (12 teams [11 teams in 2017-18]/est. 1984-85/ 13 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (aka NCHC) (8 teams/est. 2013-14/ 18 titles won amongst its eight teams).
∙Western Collegiate Hockey Association (aka WCHA) (10 teams/est. 1951-52/ 8 titles won amongst its ten teams).

The location-map here shows the 10-team Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA).
The WCHA has teams spread through 5 states, some of which are extremely far apart: 4 teams from Michigan (Ferris State, and 3 teams from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula: Lake Superior State, Michigan Tech, and Northern Michigan), 2 teams from Minnesota (Minnesota State [Mankato] and Bemidji State), 2 teams from Alaska (Alaska-Anchorage and Alaska-Fairbanks), 1 team from Ohio (Bowling Green), and 1 team from Alabama (Alabama-Huntsville).

The map
The map is based on my recently-posted 60-team NCAA D1-hockey location-map {see it here}. The WCHA hockey teams’ crests, colors and arena-locations are shown on the map. Each team’s color-circle, which radiates out from their location-dot, is sized to represent average attendance…the larger the circle, the higher the team’s average attendance. Crowd-size-rank within the 60-team-D1-hockey is also noted – by the number next to the team-name on the map and on the attendance-list. (North Dakota is the highest-drawing D1-hockey team, currently.)

The chart at the right side of the map page shows attendance data. Along with average attendances of the WCHA teams (2015-16 home regular season figures), arena sizes and percent-capacities are listed. Also shown, below the attendance data, is a list showing all D1-hockey titles which have been won by teams that currently play in the conference (in this case, all titles won by teams in the WCHA). Finally, at the lower-right of the map-page is a chart showing all D1-hockey teams’ titles and Frozen Four appearances (39 of the 60 D1-hockey teams). (Michigan has the most D1-hockey titles, but the Wolverines have not won a D1-hockey title in eighteen years (last in 1998); meanwhile, with North Dakota winning the title last season (2015-16), they have moved past Denver up to second-most D1-hockey titles, with 8. The D1-hockey team with the most Frozen Four appearances is the Boston College Eagles, with 25.)

Division I NCAA hockey was instituted in 1948.
(Division I NCAA hockey titles, 1948 to 2015-16/ 69 titles.)

    The D1-hockey realignment saw the WCHA turn from a major conference into a mid-minor…

The WCHA is extremely different from what it was before 2013 – the WCHA now has a vast (and frankly unwieldy) spread of teams: in Alaska, Alabama, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio {see WCHA former-members and WCHA timeline}. The WCHA was once one of the most elite D1-hockey conferences. That can be seen simply by the fact that the WCHA owns the record for the most D1-hockey titles…36 D1-hockey titles have been won by WCHA teams. But the vast majority of those titles – 27 D1-hockey titles – were won by four of the biggest D1-hockey teams, all of whom opted to leave the WCHA in 2013…Denver (with 7 D1-hockey titles won as a WCHA member), North Dakota (also with 7 D1-hockey titles won as a WCHA member), Wisconsin (with 6 D1-hockey titles won as a WCHA member), and Minnesota (with 5 D1-hockey titles won as a WCHA member). Also leaving the WCHA in 2013 were every other team that had fanbases sizable enough to draw above 4-K-per-game (Duluth, Colorado College, Nebraska-Omaha, St. Cloud). Leaving all the small schools left in the conference (Alaska-Anchorage, Bemidji State, Michigan Tech, Minnesota State, Northern Michigan). Then 5 schools, four of them refugees from the implosion of the CCHA, all ended up in the re-vamped and gutted new WCHA. All were from schools whose D1-hockey teams had fanbases which did not have the ability to draw above 3-K-per-game. (Alaska-Fairbanks, Alabama-Huntsville, Bowling Green [Ohio], Ferris State [Michigan], and Lake Superior State [Upper Peninsula of Michigan].) So the once-powerhouse WCHA was turned into a completely-small-school conference, and travel costs were guaranteed to go up, because of the unwieldy spread of the teams now in the conference.

If you want to know how that all happened, well, blame mid-major-program paranoia spiced with a dose of greed (shown by the schools that bolted to the new NCHC), combined with Penn State’s general bull-in-china-shop behavior, and Minnesota’s D1-hockey front office (who ignored the fans’ wishes to keep local rivalries) and ditto Wisconsin…in other words blame the Big East. As it says in the following article, Big Ten shaking up college hockey, just not on the ice, “The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a shell of its former self and bleeding money since Minnesota and Wisconsin left. Six other former WCHA schools — including 2015 Frozen Four participants North Dakota and Nebraska-Omaha — left to start the National Collegiate Hockey Conference because of concerns that they would be overshadowed by the Big Ten if they stayed.” (quote from article by Eric Olson at Detroit Free Prees/ freep.com on Feb. 26 2016).

Many puck fans in the Twin Cities feel this way, as the following two articles suggest…
-Big Ten hockey is a buzzkill for fans in Minnesota – Plenty of fans aren’t buying what new hockey league is selling (by Rachel Blount at startribune.com on Feb. 26 2016).
-Breaking Up the WCHA: the NCAA’s Worst Mistake Yet (by Alexandra Werner at freshu.io on Nov. 24 2015).

The inclusion of Penn State as a D1-hockey team led to the 2011-2013-era realignment in D1-hockey. The shakeup in D1-hockey conferences occurred in much the same way (and in nearly the same time-period) as the recent realignments in NCAA D1-football and in NCAA D1-basketball. After the dust had settled in D1-hockey, there was 6 conferences instead of 5, and one conference was dissolved – the Central Collegiate Hockey Associaition (CCHA). (The CCHA existed as a D1-hockey conference from 1973-2013; five teams left the CCHA to join the WCHA in 2013-14: Northern Michigan, Alaska Fairbanks, Bowling Green, Ferris State, Lake Superior State). And another conference was, for all intents and purposes, asset-stripped: the WCHA.

The conference that ended up most diminished in stature, after the D1-hockey realignment, was the WCHA.
The WCHA ended up losing 8 teams in 2013…Colorado College, Denver, Minnesota, Minnesota-Duluth, North Dakota, Omaha, St. Cloud State, and Wisconsin. Basically all the teams that left the WCHA in 2013 were the big-title-winning teams-and-/-or-the-higher-drawing-teams…those aforementioned big-drawing/title-winning teams (Denver, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin); an up-and-coming D1-hockey team: Minnesota-Duluth (who were D1-hockey champions in 2011, and were the 5th-highest-drawing D1-hockey team in 2015-16); and another high-drawing (though relatively new and title-less) team, Nebraska-Omaha, who are the fourth-highest-drawing team these days in D1-hockey. The sad fact of the matter is that none of the teams now in the WCHA draw higher than 3.7-K-per-game. And no current WCHA team has won the D1-hockey title in more than two decades. The most-recent D1-hockey title-winner from the present-day WCHA was Lake Superior State 22 years ago, in 1994.

And no WCHA team has made it to the Frozen Four since the 2013 realignment that gutted the WCHA. The most-recent Frozen Four team from the WCHA was the St. Cloud Huskies in 2013 (but St. Cloud is also now in the NCHC). I don’t know how you can see it otherwise: the practical upshot of the 2013 realignment is this… the big boys (Big Ten and Minnesota and Wisconsin and Penn State), got to dictate terms, and the result was that all the biggest teams bolted from two conferences (the now-defunct CCHA and the now-asset-stripped WCHA). And just left many of the small-school D1-hockey teams to twist in the wind. In a conference which makes no geographical sense, amid a realignment that makes no sense except for the big boys. A realignment that has confused the whole D1-hockey world with unanswered questions. Like, for starters, why is Air Force Academy – of Colorado Springs, CO – still in the Atlantic conference and not in the NCHC or the WCHA? Or why, exactly, should the 5 D1-hockey teams from the state of Minnesota be in THREE different conferences? Or why, exactly, should the 7 D1-hockey teams from the state of Michigan also be in THREE different conferences? Or why would you throw away a great rivalry like North Dakota versus Minnesota? I thought the whole concept of realignment meant to consolidate, not to Balkanize.

And meanwhile, Big Ten hockey teams are underperforming since the realignment.
I find it interesting that since the realignment, no Big Ten D1-hockey teams have made it to the Frozen Four (2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16: 3-seasons/16-spots, and zero Big Ten teams in the Frozen Four). Meanwhile, by its very far-flung and patched-together and decidedly-small-school nature, the WCHA has now become doomed to near-total obscurity. And travel costs have gone up around 40% per team in the WCHA since realignment {again, see this article, Big Ten shaking up college hockey, just not on the ice}. The WCHA used to make a healthy profit for its schools; now it is deep in the red, with announced losses of over a million dollars last season {see last link}. And so many great Upper Midwest D1-hockey rivalries were abandoned. For example, most-if-not-all Minnesota hockey fans would rather see their Golden Gophers versus North Dakota or Wisconsin or Duluth (or Bemidji or St. Cloud), not versus friggin’ Penn State or Ohio State. Penn State has been a big success in D1-hockey, but do you really think that would be the case without their sugar daddy (Pegula) ?. And besides, Penn State is in an entirely different region to Minnesota, with very little cultural overlap. And the embarrassing attendances for Big Ten D1-hockey conference finals bear this out – thanks to the fact that the University of Minnesota crammed the Big Ten D1-hockey concept down the throats of lifelong and multi-generational Minnesota-college-hockey-fans, who just want to see the Gophers play their real rivals, all of whom are within an easy road-trip away. Not in Pennsyl-tucky or in the part of Ohio that only cares about college football and basketball. Don’t get me started on the viability of Ohio State as a D1-hockey power…because the vast majority of people in central and south-central Ohio do not care about hockey. At all.

Post-realignment, there has been no real practical advantage gained for the teams outside the NCHC and the Big Ten.
Sure the NCHC teams are doing OK, but that is because they all ABANDONED THE SMALL SCHOOLS. And there’s no extra television revenue or exposure for any other D1-hockey teams outside the Big Ten, because D1-hockey has no significant television footprint, while the Big Ten has its own regional, and powerful, television network. The Big Ten network has no interest in promoting D1-hockey – it only has an interest in promoting Big Ten teams. D1-hockey is a niche sport. D1-hockey is extremely tied to ticket-paying support, not to television exposure. Local rivalries are the lifeblood of niche-sports, like D1-hockey, which depends heavily on ticket-paying support. Minnesota Golden Gophers fans’ displeasure can be seen in this quote from the first article I linked to, “The actual number of tickets scanned per game also has fallen since the Gophers left the WCHA, from 8,162 in 2012-13 to 7,604 last year. Scalpers outside Mariucci [Arena] say they are getting $15 for tickets with a face value of $45, and many go unsold even at that price. The Big Ten tournament has been a disappointment, too, with attendance a fraction of the 87,295 that packed Xcel Energy Center [in St. Paul, MN] for the last WCHA tournament in 2013.” (quote from Big Ten hockey is a buzzkill for fans in Minnesota – Plenty of fans aren’t buying what new hockey league is selling – (by Rachel Blount at startribune.com on Feb. 26 2016).

So, 3 years into the realignment, because of very poor ticket sales, especially in D1-hockey conference finals these past few years, now here’s three D1-hockey conference presidents acknowledging as much: WCHA pushing to to team with Big Ten, NCHC in conference finals (by David McCoy at minnesota.cbslocal.com on March 20 2016).

How long until people start talking about the realignments that need to be made in D1-hockey to correct the Balkanized realignment of 2013?
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of several teams (Wisconsin, Minnesota-Duluth, Cornell, Maine, Minnesota State, Vermont, Yale, UMass, Western Michigan, Canisius College, American International), such as at File:ECAC-Uniform-Cornell.png.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2015-2016 (uscho.com).

December 21, 2016

NCAA Division I Hockey: ECAC Hockey: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & NCAA D1-hockey titles listed.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey,NCAA, ice- ECAC — admin @ 8:42 pm

ncaa_ice-hockey_ecac-conference_attendance-map_2015-16_12-teams_post_f_.gif
NCAA Division I Hockey: ECAC Hockey: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & NCAA D1-hockey titles listed



By Bill Turianski on 21 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-Teams in ECAC, etc…ECAC Hockey (en.wikipedia.org).
-Official site…ecachockey.com/men/index.
-Conferences…Division I in ice hockey.
-USCHO page for ECAC Hockey…uscho.com/conference/ecac.

Conference-maps for NCAA Division I (aka D1) men’s ice hockey
(Note: already-posted D1-hockey conference maps are linked-to, below.)
I am making a location-map for each of the 6 D1-hockey conferences, which are…
Atlantic Hockey Association (11 teams/est. 1998-99/ zero titles).
Big Ten Conference hockey (6 teams [7-teams in 2017-18]/est. 2013-14/ 23 titles won amongst its six teams).
∙ECAC Hockey (12 teams/est. 1961-62/ 7 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
∙Hockey East Association (12 teams [11 teams in 2017-18]/est. 1984-85/ 13 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (aka NCHC) (8 teams/est. 2013-14/ 18 titles won amongst its eight teams).
Western Collegiate Hockey Association (aka WCHA) (10 teams/est. 1951-52/ 8 titles won amongst its ten teams).

Division I NCAA hockey was instituted in 1948.
(Division I NCAA hockey titles, 1948 to 2015-16/ 69 titles.)
The inclusion of Penn State as a D1-hockey team led to the 2011-2013-era realignment in D1-hockey. The shakeup in D1-hockey conferences occurred in much the same way (and in nearly the same time-period) as the recent realignments in NCAA D1-football and in NCAA D1-basketball. After the dust had settled in D1-hockey, there was 6 conferences instead of 5, and one conference was dissolved – the Central Collegiate Hockey Associaition (CCHA). (The CCHA existed as a D1-hockey conference from 1973-2013; the two teams which left the CCHA to join the brand-new NCHC are listed two paragraphs below.) (Note: there is one Independent D1-hockey team, Arizona State.)

Since 2013-14, there are two new conferences in D1-hockey:
Big Ten Conference hockey,
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC).

The location-map here shows the twelve-team ECAC hockey conference…
Formed in 1961-62, the ECAC D1-hockey conference used to be affiliated with the Eastern College Athletic Conference, a consortium of over 300 colleges in the eastern United States. This relationship ended in 2004; however, the ECAC abbreviation was retained in the name of the hockey conference. The ECAC was the only D1 men’s hockey conference that remained unchanged during the major conference realignment in 2011 and 2012.

The ECAC has teams spread through 6 states in the Northeast and in New England…6 teams from New York (Clarkson, Colgate, Cornell, Rensselaer, St. Lawrence, Union College), 2 teams from Connecticut (Quinnipiac and Yale), 1 team from Massachusetts (Harvard), 1 team from Rhode Island (Brown), 1 team from New Hampshire (Dartmouth), and 1 team from New Jersey (Princeton). (There are 6 Ivy League teams in the ECAC: Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Yale. The Ivy League does not have a D1-hockey conference, but each season the best-finisher of the 6 wins the Ivy League D1-hockey title.)

There are 5 distinct two-team clusters in the ECAC. Two teams are located in Central New York, situated 55 miles apart: Colgate (of Hamilton, NY) and Cornell (of Ithaca , NY). Two teams are located in the St. Lawrence Seaway area of Northern New York, situated 10 miles apart: Clarkson (of Potsdam, NY) and St. Lawrence (of Canton, NY). Two teams are located in the Capital/Tri-Cities region of New York, situated 14 miles apart: Rensselaer (of Troy, NY) and Union College (of Schenectady, NY). Two teams are located in south-eastern New England, situated 41 miles apart: Brown (of Providence, RI) and Harvard (of Cambridge, MA). And two teams are located in south-central Connecticut, situated just 5 miles apart: Quinnipiac (of Hamden, CT) and Yale (of New Haven, CT).

The map
The map is based on my recently-posted 60-team NCAA D1-hockey location-map {see it here}. The 12 ECAC teams’ crests, colors and locations are shown on the map. Each team’s color-circle, which radiates out from their location-dot, is sized to represent average attendance…the larger the circle, the higher the team’s average attendance. Crowd-size-rank within the 60-team-D1 is also noted – by the number next to the team-name on the map and on the attendance-list. (North Dakota is the highest-drawing D1-hockey team, currently.)

The chart at the right side of the map page shows attendance data. Along with average attendances of the 12 ECAC teams (2015-16 home regular season figures), arena sizes and percent-capacities are listed. Also shown, below the attendance data, is a list showing all D1-hockey titles which have been won by teams that currently play in the conference (in this case, all titles won by teams in the ECAC). Finally, at the lower-right of the map-page is a chart showing all D1-hockey teams’ titles and Frozen Four appearances (39 of the 60 D1-hockey teams). (Michigan has the most D1-hockey titles, but the Wolverines have not won a hockey title in eighteen years (last in 1998); meanwhile, with North Dakota winning the title last season (2015-16), they have moved past Denver up to second-most D1-hockey titles, with 8. The D1-hockey team with the most Frozen Four appearances is the Boston College Eagles, with 25.)

Five ECAC teams have won D1-hockey titles.
The Rensselaer Engineers of Troy, NY were champions in 1954, and then three decades later, in 1985, RPI won their second title. The Cornell Big Red, of Ithaca, NY, won two D1-hockey titles in a four-year span, in 1967 and in 1970. The Harvard Crimson, of Cambridge, MA, won the 1989 D1-hockey title. And the Yale Bulldogs, of New Haven, CT, were recently D1-hockey champions, in 2013. The 2013 D1-hockey final was contested between two ECAC teams, with Yale defeating nearby rivals Quinnipiac 4-0. And then the following year (2014), the tiny Union College Dutchmen (with about 2,100 undergraduates), won the D1-hockey title…without even having one scholarship player. That, to me, sums up the beauty of D1-hockey. Where minnows can run rampant.

The most recent Frozen Four appearance by an ECAC team was by Quinnipiac in 2016. Overall, Harvard boasts the most Frozen Four appearances by an ECAC team, with 12 (but none since 1994). 11 of the 12 ECAC teams have made it to a Frozen Four, with the exception being Princeton. Last season three ECAC teams qualified for the 16-team D1-hockey tournament – Quinnipiac, Yale, and Harvard.
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of several teams (Wisconsin, Minnesota-Duluth, Cornell, Maine, Minnesota State, Vermont, Yale, UMass, Western Michigan, Canisius College, American International), such as at File:ECAC-Uniform-Cornell.png.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2015-2016 (uscho.com).
-Thanks to Distance From To site.
-Thanks to FreePik.com (free photo vectors) at freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/shield, for shield-template to make Harvard VE-RI-TAS hockey jersey shoulder-patch-logo.

December 14, 2016

2016–17 Scottish Premiership (Scotland/1st division) location-map, with: 15/16 attendance data, seasons-in-1st-division-by-club & major titles listed.

Filed under: Attendance Maps & Charts,Scotland — admin @ 8:45 am

scotland_premiership_2016-17_map_w-crowds_seasons-in-1st-div_titles_post_f_.gif
2016–17 Scottish Premiership (Scotland/1st division) location-map, with: 15/16 attendance data, seasons-in-1st-division-by-club & major titles listed




By Bill Turianski on 14 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-Teams, etc…2016–17 Scottish Premiership (en.wikipedia.org).
-Fixtures, results, table, stats…Premiership [Summary] (soccerway.com/national/scotland/premier-league).
-Kits…Ladbrokes Scottish Premiership 2016 – 2017 [Scottish 1st division kits] (historicalkits.co.uk).


List of all-time seasons in the Scottish 1st division by club (1890-91 to 2016-17)…
I could not find any media outlet that had a list for Scotland – All-time 1st division seasons by club. That is including RSSSF and Wikipedia (well, I couldn’t find one, anyway). Although RSSSF does have a very confusing season-by-season list that only goes up to 2011-12, and regardless, that page at RSSSF does not tally the Scottish clubs’ seasons-in-the-1st-division into any form of readable list {see it here, Scotland – All-Time Table (since 1890/91) [and ending at 2011-12]}. So I made a list myself.

First off, counting 2016-17, there have been 120 seasons of top-flight (aka 1st division) football in Scotland.
The first season of Scottish top-flight football was in 1890-91, and the first Scottish national title was won jointly by Rangers FC and Dumbarton FC. Rangers and Dumbarton were declared joint champions after both teams finished even on points and then a play-off between the two – for the title – finished in a 2–2 draw. (Note: Dumbarton is 13 miles west of central Glasgow; Dumbarton FC are currently a 2nd division side, after having won promotion last season.) Dumbarton were champions outright in the second season of organized Scottish top-flight football (in 1891-92), and Celtic FC won their first Scottish title in the third season (in 1892-93). Then came re-organization into the Scottish League First Division (1893–1975). [Note: there were 6 seasons stricken due to World War II (1939-40 through 1945-46).]

By the 1950s, the Old Firm (Celtic and Rangers) had become the entrenched mega-clubs they are today, but even so, in the early post-War period there were several instances of clubs challenging the Old Firm’s dominance. First it was Hibernian, who won 3 titles in a 5-season-stretch (in 1948, in 1951, and in 1952). Then Aberdeen won the first of their 4 titles, when they were champions in 1955. Then Hearts were champions twice in 3 years (in 1958 and in 1960). And then, two much-smaller clubs were unlikely champions in the 1960s…with Dundee FC winning their only national title in 1962, then Kilmarnock winning their only national title in 1965.

Then came another re-organization with the Scottish Football League Premier Division (1975–98). The next 17 seasons – from 1966 to 1982 – saw the Old Firm more dominant than ever, and claim every title. But then in the 1980s, for a brief time, it looked like clubs were going to finally challenge the nigh-insurmountable Old Firm duopoly. That occurred in a 6-season spell in the first half of the 1980s, with Aberdeen winning their second title in 1980, then 3 years later Dundee United won their only national title in 1983. And then that was followed by the Alex Ferguson-led Aberdeen winning the next two national titles (in 1984 and ’85). But that was the last time neither Rangers or Celtic were champions.

The next re-organization saw the creation of the Scottish Premier League (1998–2013). And then the most recent re-organization brings us to the present-day, with the institution of the Scottish Premiership in 2013-14. Rangers were relegated down 4 divisions due to financial improprieties in May 2012. Rangers regained top-flight status in 2016-17, after one season in the 4th division, one season in the 3rd division, and two seasons in the 2nd division. So the Old Firm is back, and the last time another club has been the champions of Scotland has been 31 years ago…and counting.

The chart below shows the clubs in the Scottish Premiership and the Scottish Championship (2016-17 season)…
scotland_all-time-1st-division_seasons-by-club_titles_1890-91-to-2016-17_h_.gif
Sources for chart:
-Scotland – All-Time Table (since 1890/91) [and ending at 2011-12] (rssst.com).
-List of Scottish football champions (en.wikipedia.org).
-Scottish Premiership/Clubs (en.wikipedia.org).

___
Thanks to all at…
-Blank map of Scotland, by NordNordWest at File:Scotland location map.svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-Blank map of Greater Glasgow [segment], by Nilfanion at File:Glasgow UK location map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Rangers’ kit badge, from photo at fruugo.us.
-Partick Thistle kit badge, from photo at teamwearscotland.com.
-St Johnstone kit badge, segment from photo at St Johnstone FC shop.
-Kilmarnock kit badge, segment from unattributed photo at footballkitnews.com/jpg

December 11, 2016

NCAA Division I Hockey: the Atlantic Hockey Conference (AHC): attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey,NCAA, ice- Atlantic Conf — admin @ 7:00 pm

ncaa_ice-hockey_atlantic-hockey-conference_attendance-map_2015-16_11-teams_post_d_.gif
NCAA Division I Hockey: the Atlantic Hockey Conference (AHC): attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities



By Bill Turianski on 11 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
Conferences…Division I in ice hockey.
Teams in Atlantic Hockey, etc…Atlantic Hockey (en.wikipedia.org).
-USCHO.com Atlantic Hockey blog (uscho.com).

Conference-maps for NCAA Division I (aka D1) men’s ice hockey
(Note: already-posted D1-hockey conference maps are linked-to, below.)
I am making a location-map for each of the 6 D1-hockey conferences, which are…
Atlantic Hockey Association (11 teams/est. 1998-99/ zero titles).
Big Ten Conference hockey (6 teams [7-teams in 2017-18]/est. 2013-14/ 23 titles won amongst its six teams).
∙ECAC Hockey (12 teams/est. 1961-62/ 7 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
∙Hockey East Association (12 teams [11 teams in 2017-18]/est. 1984-85/ 13 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (aka NCHC) (8 teams/est. 2013-14/ 18 titles won amongst its eight teams).
Western Collegiate Hockey Association (aka WCHA) (10 teams/est. 1951-52/ 8 titles won amongst its ten teams).

The location-map here shows the eleven-team Atlantic Hockey Conference (AHC).
The AHC has teams spread through four Northeastern states, plus Colorado. There are 4 teams from New York (Canisius College, Niagara, Rochester Institute of Technology [RIT], US Military Academy [Army]), 3 teams from Massachusetts (American International University [AIC], Bentley, Holy Cross), 2 teams from Pennsylvania (Mercyhurst and Robert Morris), 1 team from Connecticut (Sacred Heart), and 1 team from Colorado (US Air Force Academy).

The map
The map is based on my recently-posted 60-team NCAA D1-hockey location-map {see it here}. The Atlantic Hockey teams’ crests, colors and arena-locations are shown on the map. Each team’s color-circle, which radiates out from their location-dot, is sized to represent average attendance…the larger the circle, the higher the team’s average attendance. Crowd-size-rank within the 60-team-D1 is also noted – by the number next to the team-name on the map and on the attendance-list. (North Dakota is the highest-drawing D1-hockey team, currently.)

The chart at the right side of the map page shows attendance data. Along with average attendances of the 11 Atlantic hockey teams (2015-16 home regular season figures), arena sizes and percent-capacities are listed. At the lower-right of the map-page is a chart showing all D1-hockey teams’ titles and Frozen Four appearances (39 of the 60 D1-hockey teams).

Of the eleven Atlantic Hockey teams, eight of them are in the bottom ten of D1-hockey attendance…
Not only is Atlantic Hockey full of teams that are decidedly small-program, there are no D1-hockey titles won among its eleven teams. But there are four teams in Atlantic Hockey which are filling their small arenas pretty well. The Mercyhurst Lakers (of Erie, PA) are playing to sell-out crowds most games (they drew 1.2 K in their 1.3-K-capacity arena last season). And the Air Force Falcons, the RIT Tigers, and the Holy Cross Crusaders are all drawing above 75 percent-capacity.

I suspect most teams in Atlantic Hockey do not benefit from much local newspaper coverage or from local television-sports-news coverage, and this contributes to low attendance. Here is an article from the Buffalo News from March 2015, which discusses this, BNRinkside: College hockey attendance analytics (by Amy Moritz at buffalonews.com). In that article it is said that “Atlantic Hockey could do better to promote itself, not just nationally but in its own markets.” But how? If the local media aren’t covering Atlantic Hockey teams because they draw so low, how do you get people to know you even exist? It is a Catch-22-situation that ends up dooming low-drawing Atlantic Hockey teams to small crowds, thanks to a non-existent media footprint. In other words, they don’t get any local news coverage because they draw so poorly, and they draw so poorly because they don’t get any local news coverage.

That being said, there are a few teams in Atlantic Hockey that enjoy decent coverage in their local newspaper, like my hometown’s team, the RIT Tigers (see 2 paragraphs below). And like the Holy Cross Crusaders (of Worcester, MA), as this write-up of a recent game shows. And like Air Force (of Colorado Springs, CO)/see this. And like the two Greater Buffalo-based teams (Canisius College and Niagara)/see this.

But many teams in Atlantic Hockey, like the Robert Morris Patriots (of Moon Township, Greater Pittsburgh, PA), get very spotty coverage (like a report on a game a week ago, but no report on the Robert Morris game versus Bentley on Dec. 10th). Or gets none at all (note how at that link there is a section for the minor-league soccer team [Pittsburgh Riverhounds], but no section at all for any Robert Morris sports teams). And the same can be said – for a complete lack of media coverage – of the two Atlantic Hockey teams within the Greater New York City area: the Sacred Heart Pioneers (of Fairfield, CT) and the Army Black Knights (of West Point, NY). Ditto for the Bentley Falcons (of Waltham, MA), in Boston. I could not find any coverage of the AIC Yellow Jackets in the Springfield, Massachusetts television and print media. And it looks like the Mercyhurst Lakers get less coverage than local high school hockey and the Erie Otters (who play in the Ontario Hockey League and draw 4 times what Mercyhurts draws/see this recent OHL map I made).

In my hometown – Rochester, NY – that is actually not the case, and the RIT Tigers hockey team gets pretty solid coverage in the local newspaper, and from the local cable 24-hour news channel, as well as the local network-television stations (like this: RIT hockey toger toss and this: RIT Hockey Loses Series Against Providence). But that is because my hometown is a real anomaly. Rochester has a population of around 1.1 million in its metro-area (making it the 54th largest city in the USA/see this). Despite that, Rochester is one of the two largest city/metro-areas in the USA without even a D1-college basketball team, let alone any major league teams, or a D1-football team. (The only other city of equal-or-greater-size with that same situation is Grand Rapids, MI [52nd-largest-city in the USA], which also has no major league teams, or D1-football teams, or D1-basketball teams.)

So when the RIT Tigers hockey team made the leap up, from Division III to Division I in 2005, it was relatively big news in my sleepy town, because Rochester finally had a D1 team, albeit only in hockey. But Rochester is a hockey town (the Rochester Amerks are the second-oldest team in the AHL and are the nearby Buffalo Sabres’ top farm team). Now in a new, on-campus 4.3-K-capacity arena, the RIT Tigers lead Atlantic Hockey in attendance, drawing 3.3 K. And the RIT Tigers made it to a Frozen Four (in 2010), which is the only time any Atlantic Hockey team has ever done so.
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of several teams (Wisconsin, Minnesota-Duluth, Cornell, Maine, Minnesota State, Vermont, Yale, UMass, Western Michigan, Canisius College, American International), such as at File:ECAC-Uniform-Cornell.png.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2015-2016 (uscho.com).

December 7, 2016

NCAA Division I Hockey: Big Ten Conference hockey: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & D1-hockey titles listed.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey,NCAA, ice- Big Ten hockey — admin @ 4:15 pm

ncaa_ice-hockey_big-ten-conference_attendance-map_2015-16_7-teams_post_b_.gif
NCAA Division I Hockey: Big Ten Conference hockey: attendance map (2015-16 regular season), with arena capacities, percent-capacities & D1-hockey titles listed



By Bill Turianski on 7 December 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
Conferences…Division I in ice hockey.
Teams, etc…Big Ten Conference hockey (en.wikipedia.org).

Conference-maps for NCAA Division I (aka D1) men’s ice hockey
(Note: already-posted D1-hockey conference maps are linked-to, below.)
I am making a location-map for each of the 6 D1-hockey conferences, which are…
Atlantic Hockey Association (11 teams/est. 1998-99/ zero titles).
Big Ten Conference hockey (6 teams [7-teams in 2017-18]/est. 2013-14/ 23 titles won amongst its six teams).
∙ECAC Hockey (12 teams/est. 1961-62/ 7 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
∙Hockey East Association (12 teams [11 teams in 2017-18]/est. 1984-85/ 13 titles won amongst its twelve teams).
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (aka NCHC) (8 teams/est. 2013-14/ 18 titles won amongst its eight teams).
Western Collegiate Hockey Association (aka WCHA) (10 teams/est. 1951-52/ 8 titles won amongst its ten teams).

The location-map here shows the 6-team (and soon-to-be-7-team) Big Ten Conference hockey.
Big Ten hockey has teams spread through 5 states in the Northeast/Upper Midwest: 2 teams from Michigan (Michigan and Michigan State), 1 team from Minnesota (Minnesota), 1 team from Wisconsin (Wisconsin), 1 team from Ohio (Ohio State), and 1 team from Pennsylvania (Penn State). Next season – 2017-18 – Notre Dame (of Notre Dame, Indiana) will join Big Ten Conference hockey to make it a 7-team conference. So I have included Notre Dame on the map, with a captions describing their future inclusion into Big Ten hockey. I also added Notre Dame’s attendance data. {Also see this, Notre Dame Fighting Irish men’s ice hockey.}

The map
The map is based on my recently-posted 60-team NCAA D1-hockey location-map {see it here}. The Big Ten hockey teams’ crests, colors and arena-locations are shown on the map. Each team’s color-circle, which radiates out from their location-dot, is sized to represent average attendance…the larger the circle, the higher the team’s average attendance. Crowd-size-rank within the 60-team-D1 is also noted – by the number next to the team-name on the map and on the attendance-list. (North Dakota is the highest-drawing D1-hockey team, currently.)

The chart at the right side of the map page shows attendance data. Along with average attendances of the Big Ten hockey teams (2015-16 home regular season figures), arena sizes and percent-capacities are listed. Also shown, below the attendance data, is a list showing all D1-hockey titles which have been won by teams that currently play in the conference (in this case, all titles won by teams in Big Ten Conference hockey). Finally, at the lower-right of the map-page is a chart showing all D1-hockey teams’ titles and Frozen Four appearances (39 of the 60 D1-hockey teams). (Michigan has the most D1-hockey titles, but the Wolverines have not won a hockey title in eighteen years (last in 1998); meanwhile, with North Dakota winning the title last season (2015-16), they have moved past Denver up to second-most D1-hockey titles, with 8. The D1-hockey team with the most Frozen Four appearances is the Boston College Eagles, with 25.)

Division I NCAA hockey was instituted in 1948.
(Division I NCAA hockey titles, 1948 to 2015-16/ 69 titles.)
The inclusion of Penn State as a D1-hockey team (who debuted in 2012-13), led to the 2011-2013-era realignment in D1-hockey. The shakeup in D1-hockey conferences occurred in much the same way (and in nearly the same time-period) as the recent realignments in NCAA D1-football and in NCAA D1-basketball. After the dust had settled in D1-hockey, there was 6 conferences instead of 5, and one conference was dissolved – the Central Collegiate Hockey Associaition (CCHA). (The CCHA existed as a D1-hockey conference from 1973-2013.) (Note: there is one D1-hockey team that is currently an Independent, newcomers Arizona State.)

Since 2013-14, there are two new conferences in D1-hockey:
Big Ten Conference hockey,
National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC).

In D1-hockey these days, the Big Ten is the 800-pound gorilla in the room…
The creation of Big Ten Conference hockey has upset some within the D1-college-hockey community. They fear that the days of small schools being able to compete in D1-hockey may be soon over. And it is not just that small schools have been able to be in, and compete well, in D1-hockey. It is the fact that, going back many decades, small schools within D1-hockey have actually been able to win D1 titles. Like how all three D1-hockey schools from the Upper Peninsula in Michigan (Michigan Tech, Northern Michigan, and Lake Superior State) were able to win D1-hockey titles in the time period from the 1960s up until the mid-1990s. And more recently, like how tiny Union College (of Schenectedy, NY) won the 2014 D1-hockey title. Despite Union College being a school with an enrollment of only around 2,240 undergraduates, and despite the Union College Dutchmen having a D1-hockey team without a single scholarship-player.

Here an excerpt from an article from 2014 from the College Hockey News site, ‘From the get go, there’s been a worry that the formation of the Big Ten would allow the rich to get richer, allow recruiting budgets to go even higher, increase the distance between the big guy and little guy.’ (quote from Stop Complaining – Conference Tournaments’ Attendance, Setup Not Worthy of Scorn by Adam Woden at collegehockeynews.com).

Big Ten hockey did something recently that was by most accounts pretty tone-deaf. They made, unilaterally, a proposal to the NCAA, to toughen the D1-hockey rules for older-aged players’ eligibility, which would end up hurting the smaller schools. (You can read about that in the article at the link below.) That action by Big Ten hockey is being perceived by some as perhaps being a foreshadowing of the big schools throwing their weight around in D1-hockey, to the detriment of the smaller D1-hockey schools. Here is an article from July 2016, from SB Nation, on the Big Ten’s entrance into D1-hockey and how it has some worried (note: the comments section at the link below is also worth reading, as several commenters there raise some interesting points)…The Fabled Big Ten Hockey Conference Is Ruffling Feathers Did you know that many hockey fans outside of the Big Ten are not happy about the conference’s existence? – (by Chris Taylor at blackshoediaries.com).
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of several teams (Wisconsin, Minnesota-Duluth, Cornell, Maine, Minnesota State, Vermont, Yale, UMass, Western Michigan, Canisius College, American International), such as at File:ECAC-Uniform-Cornell.png.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2015-2016 (uscho.com).

November 29, 2016

2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round – map and attendance list./+ Stourbridge FC, the lowest-placed club still alive in the tournament.

Filed under: 2016-17 FA Cup — admin @ 1:55 pm

2016-17_fa-cup_2nd-round_location-map_40-clubs_w-current-attendances-in-leagues_w-fixtures_post_b_.gif
2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round map and attendance list




Links…
-The competition…FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-2nd Round: fixtures/teams… (us.soccerway.com/national/england/fa-cup).
-BBC’s page on the FA Cup…FA Cup (bbc.com/sport/football/fa-cup).
-2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round Tie-by-Tie Preview (facupfactfile.wordpress.com).
-FA Cup second round: Early reunions and second chances among stories to watch (compiled by Tom Garry on 2 December 2016 at bbc.com/football).

By Bill Turianski on 29 November 2016; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.com.

Schedule for 2016-17 FA Cup…
2016-17_fa-cup_schedule_d_.gif

The map…
The map shows the 40 clubs who have qualified for the 2016-17 FA Cup Second Round Proper. There are 12 Non-League teams still alive, as well as 28 teams from the lower two divisions of the Football League (Leagues One and Two). Also on the map page is the 2nd Round fixture list, and there is a list of the 40 clubs’ current home league average attendances.

The lowest-placed club to qualify for the 2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round is Stourbridge FC
Stourbridge are in the Northern Premier League (which is a 7th-level league); they currently are in 10th place. Stourbridge FC are drawing 778 per game, which is the highest crowd-size in the league. Stourbridge is in the Black Country region of the West Midlands, just southwest of Dudley, and 18 km (11 mi) W of central Birmingham (as the crow flies). As it says at Stourbridge’s Wikipedia page,…”Historically a part of Worcestershire, Stourbridge was a centre of glass making, and today includes the suburbs of Amblecote, Lye, Norton, Oldswinford, Pedmore, Wollaston, Wollescote and Wordsley.” Stourbridge has a population of around 63,000 {2011 figure}.

Owing to the town’s traditional association with the glass-making and cut-glass industries, the football team is known as the Glassboys. They wear red-and-white vertically-striped jerseys. Stourbridge have played at the War Memorial Athletic Ground for over 120 years (since 1890). (The War Memorial Athletic Ground is sometimes referred to as Amblecoat, for the region in Stourbridge that the ground is located in.) It is a dual-sport facility: Stourbridge FC ground-share with the Stourbridge Cricket Club. So the pitch features just three sides of small-stands-or-terracing, with the one long side open to accommodate the cricket playing-field. The main stand is very small and features a small central section that is a barn-style roof. Here is a nice groundhoppers-type article, from 2013, which features Stourbridge’s ground [scroll all the way to the end of the post to see the Stourbridge section], 20 Glorious Non-League Grounds (peterrmiles.wordpress.com).

The manager of Stourbridge FC is Gary Hackett, who is Stourbridge-born and has been on the coaching staff at Stourbridge since 2003. Gary Hackett is a former Winger who had a long career at Bomsgrove Rovers, Shrewsbury Town, Aberdeen (in Scotland), West Bromwich Albion, Peterborough United, Chester City, and Halesowen Town, retiring from the playing field in 1997. Gary Hacket has been at the helm at Stourbridge for 11 years now. In the early 2000s, Jon Ford and Gary Hackett had been the co-managers at nearby Bomsgrove Rovers. The two moved over to Stourbridge FC in 2003. Hackett took over as full-time manager of Stoursbridge in 2005, with Ford taking the assistant manager job (Ford decided to step down owing to work and family commitments). The two have remained in those capacities ever since, ushering in Stourbridge’s best decade ever. In that time, the Glassboys have won two promotions (up to the 7th level) and have qualified for the FA Cup 5 times in 8 years, including 4 FA Cup 2nd Round appearances, two of which as the lowest-placed team still alive in the competition.

Stourbridge have had a recent history of FA Cup success…
Stourbridge FC have been around since 1876, but had never made it to the FA Cup 1st Round in over a century of trying, until the 2009-10 season. And then making it to the 2nd Round four times in less than a decade…well that is a pretty impressive accomplishment for a club that has never been above the 7th division. Stourbridge’s second FA Cup 1st Round appearance, in 2011-12, saw them beat Football League mainstays Plymouth Argyle (in the re-play) to make it to the 2nd Round. The re-play at home v Plymouth, and the 2nd Round match at home v Stevenage were both televised. Then Stourbridge also made it to the 2nd Round in 2013-14, when they beat 7th-level-side Biggleswade Town. Then in 2015-16, Stourbridge beat then-5th-division-side and local rivals Kidderminster Harriers in the 4th Qualifying Round, and then beat 5th-division-side Dover Athletic, away, in the 1st Round, to again advance to the 2nd Round. And then this season [2016-17], Stourbridge once again advanced to the 2nd Round when they beat 9th-level-side Westfields (in the re-play).

Now, in the 2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round, Stourbridge have gotten a decent match-up – at home versus 3rd-division-side Northampton Town (who are in 17th place in League One currently). As the FA Cup Factfile site says…”Stourbridge fans and players can take heart in the knowledge that The Cobblers hold the record of most FA Cup 2nd Round exits with 30.”…{excerpt from 2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round Tie-by-Tie Preview (facupfactfile.wordpress.com)}. I think a draw or even a giant-killing upset is definitely feasible at Stourbridges’ War Memorial Athletic Ground [on Sunday the 4th of December 2016]. Especially because Northampton Town’s top priority is to avoid being relegated right back to the 4th division, yet have lost the 4 straight League One games leading up to this Cup-match on Sunday. The match is sold out {see this, from the official Stourbridge FC site.}

Televised matches for 2016-17 FA Cup 2nd Round…
In my opinion, the Stourbridge-v-Northampton match should have been chosen as one of the live televised games, but it wasn’t. That being said, there is a very enticing match being televised live…Curzon Ashton v AFC Wimbledon. 6th-level/National League North side Curzon Ashton are from the eastern part of Greater Manchester, in the foothills of the Pennines just south of Oldham (and 10 km E of Manchester). At their relatively-new Tameside Stadium in Ashton-under-Lyme (which opened in 2005), Curzon Ashton will host AFC Wimbledon, the world-renowned supporter-owned club from South London (who are now in the 3rd division, and have been playing well, and sit 7th, just below the play-off places). {To whet your appetite for the match, here is a Curzon Ashton/Tameside Stadium groundhopping-post, from 2012, from the excellent Gibbos92 site, here.} That Curzon Ashton/AFC Wimbledon match is on the Sunday the 4th. Also being televised live for the 2nd Round is the Friday the 2nd game: Macclesfield Town v Oxford United, as well as the Monday the 5th game: Lincoln City v Oldham Athletic. {Here is a nice Macclesfield Town/Moss Rose groundhopping-post, from 2013 from the great Groundhopping.se site, here; here is a nice Lincoln City/Sincil Bank groundhopping-post from, from 2016, from the Groundhopping with Ryan blog, here.}

Below: the War Memorial Athletic Ground, home of Stourbridge FC…
stourbridge-fc_war-memorial-athletic-ground_gary-hackett_c_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Stourbridge home kit, illustration from en.wikipedia.org. Stourbridge town centre, photo by Stephen McKay at commons.wikimedia.org. Photo of entrance to ground, photo unattributed at warmemorials.myfastforum.org. Photo of main stand, photo by europlan-online.de. Game-action shot of main stand, photo by richardl1967 at stadiumsandcities.wordpress.com. Shot of manager Gary Hackett, photo by Kevin Quigley via dailymail.co.uk/football.

____
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.
-Photo of Curzon Ashton badge, photo from ebay.com.
-Current average attendance figures from Soccerway.com.
-Current average attendance for lower Non-League club (7th Level), at non-league-matters.co.uk.

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