billsportsmaps.com

April 12, 2019

1925 Major League Baseball: Map with logos & uniforms. Including final standings, top players, and attendance + 1925 World Series winners: Pittsburgh Pirates.

Filed under: Baseball,MLB>1925 map & season,Retro maps — admin @ 1:13 pm

mlb_al_nl_1925-map_w-uniforms_logos_standings_stats-leaders_1925-ws-champs_pittsburgh-pirates_post_u_.gif
1925 Major League Baseball: map with crests & uniforms, final standings and stats leaders; champions: Pittsburgh Pirates



By Bill Turianski on 12 April 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Sources
-Baseball-Reference.com, 1925 AL season; 1925 NL season.
-Major League Baseball (en.wikipedia.org).
-SportsLogos.net.
-Baseball Hall of Fame’s Dressed to the Nines (uniforms illustrated by Marc Okkonen), exhibits.baseballhalloffame.org/dressed_to_the_nines/database.htm.
-MLB.cm/shop.
-US cities’ populations (1920 figures), biggestuscities.com/1920.

This is a new template and category: MLB retro maps. I plan on posting maps of MLB, from 1925, on into the 1930s.

Aspects of the map-and-chart:
A). 1925 location-map of the 16 MLB teams. Home cities listed, then franchises listed in smaller text below the home-city name. Each team (franchise) has at least one logo from that year (in this case, 1925); the logos are sized to reflect average attendance from that season: the higher-drawing teams have larger logos-and-or-multiple-logos. In this case, that applies to the top-drawing teams in the NL in 1925 (the Pirates, the NY Giants, the Brooklyn Robins [aka Dodgers], and the Cubs), and it applies to the top-drawing teams in the AL in 1925 (the Philadelphia Athletics, the White Sox, the Senators, the Tigers, and the Yankees). Similarly, the lower-drawing teams in MLB that season have much smaller logos on the map (in this case, such as the Red Sox and the Phillies).

B). Population of US cities (1920 figures). A small chart showing the 25-then-largest cities of the USA in 1920 is shown at the upper-left-hand side of the map. MLB representation-by-city is noted there. Populations of MLB cities in the 1920s, and drawing-power of the 16 MLB teams from this era, is discussed below.

C). Attendance {data from baseball-reference.com}.  1925 average attendances are shown at the upper-right of the map. They are also shown below. Further below is an article about MLB attendance team-by-team, circa the 1920s.

D). World Series champions (for 1925, the Pittsburgh Pirates). World Series champions are represented by a prominent section at the top of the map. Shown are uniforms and logos, and World Series winners’ rings (or jeweled stick-pin, in this case). Also shown is photo of a ticket from one of the WS games that year (or maybe a souvenir program from the WS that year, or a Press pin). A photo of the manager of the WS winner is shown, along with 5 or 6 or 7 photos of the top players on the WS-winning team that year. (Top players are determined by WAR [Wins After Replacement].) Players who have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame [HoF] are noted, by a bronze-colored square with year of HoF election listed.

E). Top players in MLB for that season are shown at the foot of the map. Photos of stats leaders in several categories are shown…for Pitchers: ERA, Wins, and WAR (Pitchers); for Position-Players: Batting Average (BAvg), HR, RBI, OPS, and WAR. Again, HoF players are noted.

F). MLB team sections: flanking sections, in alphabetized chart-form, show the 8 NL franchises (of 1925) on the far-left of the map, and the 8 AL franchises (of 1925) on the far-right of the map.

(Note: all 16 of the MLB franchises from this era still exist, although, of course, some franchises [9 franchises] have moved to different cities.) In each franchise’s rectangular box is shown their uniforms from that season, and at least one of their primary logos from that season, along with a narrow bar that is in the team’s colors that season. A photo of the present-day-franchise’s home ball cap is shown [2019 caps]. And franchise info is shown for each team, including: years of existence [seasons in NL or AL], location(s), league-titles [Pennants] and MLB titles [WS titles], plus any franchise movements. Standard abbreviations for each team are used. As far as former teams go, to avoid any confusion, I used baseball-reference.com’s abbreviations. {Here: baseball-reference.com/about/[team_IDs](aka abbreviations).}

G). NL and AL final standings and the World Series result, for that year, are shown in the lower-right-hand side of the map, in a rectangle which is the approximate color of a faded old newspaper. I used a Times Roman font in this section to further evoke the newsprint style of that era.

I tried to make the map look like it was printed in a newspaper from ninety years ago, but then inlaid with full-color logos.

I will post my 1926 MLB map (featuring 1926 WS champions the St. Louis Cardinals), in mid-May 2019.

    A look at MLB attendance, circa the mid-1920s, by city

(There were 10 cities with MLB teams back then)…

1925 MLB Average Attendance
PHA 11.2 K
CHW 10.8 K
WSH 10.7 K
DET 10.6 K
PIT 10.4 K
NYG 10.2 K
NYY 8.8 K
BRO 8.5 K
CHC 8.0 K
CIN 6.1 K
SLB 5.9 K
CLE 5.4 K
STL 5.3 K
BSN 4.1 K
PHI 3.9 K
BOS 3.5 K
Source:
baseball-reference.com/[1925/MLB/attendance+misc.].

Overall, MLB attendances from the 1920s are rather low by modern standards. But this was in an era before night games, and A-shift workers were at work when most MLB games were played back then (in other words, the working-class baseball fan in the 1920s would usually only be able to get to the ballpark on weekends). Circa 1925, a high-drawing MLB team would be defined as one who drew as little as 10-to-13 K. When the Yankees started dominating in the 1927-28 time period, they were still playing to a whole lot of empty seats at Yankee Stadium, drawing only 15.1 K per game in 1927, and 13.9 K in ’28. It wasn’t until after World War II that MLB teams began drawing in the 15-to-25-K range, and even into the 1950s, the attendances seem pretty low compared to modern figures. For example, 30 years after 1925, in 1955, the top-drawing MLB team was the Milwaukee Braves at 23.1 K per game, while the New York Yankees, then at the peak of their domination of Major League Baseball, were drawing 2nd-best at just 19.3 K.

Generally speaking, the three biggest influences on crowd-size were (and still are): the size of the city itself, the success of the ball club at that point in time, and the quality of the venue.

New York, NY (this city had 3 MLB teams in 1925): The 3 New York City-based teams generally had higher attendances than, say, teams from much smaller cities, like Cincinnati: that’s just logical [NYC had about a 5.6 million population in 1920].

Brooklyn Dodgers: In 1925, the Brooklyn National League ball club was then known as the Robins, although many Brooklynites did also call them the Dodgers. Brooklyn was pretty bad for long periods of time in both the 1920s and the ’30s, and in 1925 they finished in second-to-last (7th place), but Brooklyn still drew a decent 8.1 K per game at Ebbets Field.

New York Giants: The New York baseball Giants, at the Polo Grounds in northern Manhattan, were good enough for 2nd place in the NL in 1925, and the Giants drew a solid 10.2 K per game. The Giants were a dominant team of the early 1920s, coming off of 4 straight NL Pennants and 2 WS titles (in 1921 & ’22).

New York Yankees: A mile east of the NY Giants, across the narrow Harlem River, in the Bronx, were the then-upstart New York Yankees, at their new palace of baseball, Yankee Stadium. The Yankees had been renters of the Giants at the nearby Polo Grounds from 1913 to 1922, but the Giants kicked the Yankees out when they started stealing their media-attention and drawing better than them. (The original Yankee Stadium had opened in April 1923.) The Yankees had won their first AL pennants in 1921 and ’22, and were first-time World Series champions in 1923. The Yankees drew 13-to-15-K per game through these 3 years (1921-23). The Yankees had an off-season in 1925, and finished in 7th in the AL, and their gates reflected that, with an average crowd of 8.8 K (down about 7 K per game, from four years earlier).

Chicago, IL (this city had 2 MLB teams in 1925): America’s second-city back then was Chicago, IL [Chicago had a population of 2.7 million in 1920]. Chicago’s 2 MLB teams – the White Sox and the Cubs – drew well, especially when they fielded competitive teams, but even when losers, both still drew better than most (similar to the 3 NYC teams). Both teams had been successful earlier on, but by the mid-1920s had fallen into mediocrity.

White Sox: At the old Comiskey Park on the South Side of Chicago, the AL’s White Sox drew 10.1 K per game as a 5th place team in 1925.

Cubs: The Chicago Cubs finished in last in the National League in 1925, yet still drew 8.0 K per game at Cubs Park [which was re-named Wrigley Field in 1926].

Philadelphia, PA (this city had 2 MLB teams in 1925): Third-largest city in America in 1920 was Philadelphia, PA [1.8 million population back then]. And there, it was a case of one Philly ball club with very strong drawing power (the Philadelphia Athletics), and one Philly ball club which was a perennially poor-drawing basement-dweller (the Philadelphia Phillies).

Philadelphia Athletics: The Athletics were successful (6 AL pennants and 3 WS titles up to that point), and they had an excellent venue back then (Shibe Park). In 1925, as a 2nd-place team, the Athletics drew best in MLB, at 11.2 K per game.

Philadelphia Phillies: The Philadelphia Phillies played at the bandbox that was the Baker Bowl; in 1925 they drew 2nd-lowest in 1925, at 3.9 K per game, and finished in 6th.

St. Louis, MO and Boston, MA (both these cities had 2 MLB teams each in 1925): Of the 5 cities with multiple MLB teams in this era (New York City, Chicago, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Boston), the two smallest of those cities, St. Louis and Boston, had teams that very often struggled at the gate, especially when they were lousy. (Both St. Louis and Boston only had about .75 million people back in 1920.)

Boston, MA: The Boston Red Sox were bad in the 1920s, and averaged sparse crowds at Fenway Park, in the abysmal 3-to-4 K-per-game range; ditto the Boston Braves, at Braves Field.

St. Louis, MO: St. Louis had a big-team/small-team-dynamic like the one in Philadelphia: one very-often-competitive team (the St. Louis Cardinals) that drew generally much better than the local basement-dwellers (the St. Louis Browns). Ironically, the better-drawing and more successful team in St. Louis – the Cardinals – were renters to the sad sack Browns, at the old Sportsman’s Park there.

Detroit, MI and Cleveland, OH: In the 1920s, there were two cities that only had one Major League team (an American League team), yet were slightly larger than the two-team cities of St. Louis and Boston. Those two cities were Detroit, MI [the 4th-largest city in the USA in 1920 with a .99 million pop], and Cleveland, OH [at .79 million, the 5th-largest in 1920].

Detroit Tigers: At Navin Field [Tiger Stadium], Detroit could draw strong crowds: they drew 10.6 K per game as a mediocre .513 Pct/4th place team in 1925. The Tigers remained a top-5-drawing team through most of the 1920s.

Cleveland Indians: Cleveland had less drawing power; they drew 5.4 K in 1925 at League Park, as a 6th place team. The following season of 1926 saw the Indians in a pennant-race, yet they drew an underwhelming 7.8 K.

(Note: the 8th-largest city circa the 1920s was Baltimore, MD [.73 million], but Baltimore, which had a very successful NL franchise in the late 1800s [Baltimore Orioles (I) (1882-99)], was shut out of the Majors from 1903 to 1953. Baltimore had had an AL team in the American League’s first two seasons [Baltimore Orioles (II) (1901-02)], but that franchise moved to New York in 1903, to become the NY Highlanders [then changed their name to the NY Yankees in 1913].) Baltimore would have to be content with a minor league ball club for five decades, before the city lured the struggling St. Louis Browns AL franchise to move to Baltimore and become the Baltimore Orioles (III) in 1954.)

Pittsburgh Pirates: Ninth-largest city in America in the 1920s was Pittsburgh, PA [.58 million]. The Pirates played at Forbes Field from 1909 to 1970. Pittsburgh drew well when they were winning (like in the 1925-29 time period). And the Pirates had the highest NL attendance, and the 5th-highest attendance in all of MLB in 1925, at 10.4 K per game. Under manager Bill McKechnie, the 1925 Pirates were the Major League champions, defeating the reigning champs, the Washington Senators, 4 games to 3, in the 1925 World Series.

Washington, DC and Cincinnati, OH: That covers 14 of the 16 MLB teams circa 1925. The other two MLB teams back then came from considerably smaller cities: Washington, DC [14th-largest US city in 1920 at .43 million], and Cincinnati, OH [16th-largest US city in 1920 at .40 million]. Back then, Washington, DC and Cincinnati, OH, both with populations of around 400,000, were almost half the size of cities like St. Louis or Boston. So it’s not surprising that both MLB teams from these two smaller cities generally drew low crowds.

Washington Senators: But in 1925, the Washington Senators were reigning World Series champs (the Senators won their only WS title in 1924). And in 1925, the Washington Senators were en route to a second-straight AL pennant title, and consequently had some of the largest crowds that year (the Senators drew 3rd-best in all of MLB in 1925, at 10.7 K per game at Griffith Stadium). But to give you an idea of how unusual that was for the often hapless Senators, that 10.7 K per game that Washington drew in 1925 would not be surpassed by the team until 21 years later, in 1946.

Cincinnati Reds: As for Cincinnati, they could maintain somewhat decent crowds when marginally competitive. In 1925, the Reds finished in 3rd in the NL, 7 games above .500, and drew 6.1 K. Which is not bad at all for the team from the smallest MLB city of the 1920s. The Reds played at Crosley Field (1912-1970).

1925 MLB stats Leaders.
ERA: Dolph Luque, Cincinnati Reds.
Wins: Dazzy Vance, Brooklyn Robins.
Batting Avg: Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis Cardinals.
HR: Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis Cardinals.
RBI: Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis Cardinals.
On Base+Slugging Pct (OPS): Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis Cardinals.
Wins Above Replacement (WAR):
(Position Players): Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis Cardinals.
(WAR for Pitchers): Herb Pennock, New York Yankees.

___
Photo and Image credits on the map page…
Base map: Outline map of USA from University of Texas at Austin online archive (Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection), legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states.html; legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/usa_blank2.jpg.

Banner: 1925 WS champs, Pittsburgh Pirates…
1925 WS ticket, from hugginsandscott.com. Ticket-stub segment, from sports.ha.com/1925-world-series-game-seven-full-tickets-sheet.1925 Pirates uniforms, illustrations by Marc Okkonen at exhibits.baseballhalloffame.org/dressed_to_the_nines/[1925-PIT]. 1925 Pirates jersey [original], from sports.mearsonlineauctions.com. 1925 Pirates jeweled pin (1925 WS champions pin), from tjscollectiblesinc.com. Bill McKechnie [photo from 1925 WS], unattributed at wilkinsburghistory.wordpress.com. Kiki Cuyler [photo from 1925], unattributed at sabr.org. Max Carey [photo circa 1922], unattributed at sportsecyclopedia.com. Glenn Wright [colorized photo from 1925], photo unattributed/colorized by Baseball In Color at twitter.com/@BaseballInColor; unattributed at pinterest.com. Vic Aldridge [photo from 1925], unattributed at amazon.com. Pie Traynor [colorized photo from 1925], photo unattributed/colorized by Baseball In Color at twitter.com/@BaseballInColor. Lee Meadows [photo from 1927], from Detroit Public Library digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org.

1925 MLB Stats leaders…
Dolph Luque [photo circa 1923], photo from twitter.com/[@Reds]. Dazzy Vance [photo from 1925], photo unattributed at ebay.com. Rogers Hornsby [photo from 1925], photo by Sporting News and Rogers Photo Archive via Getty Images at gettyimages.com. Rogers Hornsby [US Postal Service stamp from 2000], from mysticstamp.com. Herb Pennock [photo circa 1926], photo unattributed at 1927-the-diary-of-myles-thomas.espn.com/herb-pennock.

Colorized photo of Philadelphia Athletics 1925-27 elephant-logo jersey, photo unattributed and colorized by Natalia Valiukevich/mediadrumworld.com via dailymail.co.uk/article.

Thanks to all at the links below,
-University of Texas at Austin online archive (Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection), legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states.html.
-Baseball-Reference.com, 1925 AL season; 1925 NL season.
-Major League Baseball (en.wikipedia.org).
-SportsLogos.net.
-Baseball Hall of Fame’s Dressed to the Nines (uniforms illustrated by Marc Okkonen), exhibits.baseballhalloffame.org/dressed_to_the_nines/database.htm.
-MLB.cm/shop.
-US cities’ populations (1920 figures), biggestuscities.com/1920.

March 27, 2019

2019 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With 2018-19 attendance data, and all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list./+Update: illustrations for the 2019 Frozen Four: UMass Minutemen, Denver Pioneers, Providence Friars, Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs.

Filed under: NCAA, ice hockey — admin @ 12:21 pm

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2019 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: the 16 teams that qualified. With 2017-18 attendance data, and all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list



By Bill Turianski on 27 March 2019. twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Live scores (collegehockeynews.com).
-2019 NCAA Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Tournament (en.wikipedia.org).
-2018-19 attendance [#1 North Dakota 11.3 K; #2 Wisconsin 10.0 K; #3 Minnesota 7.9 K; #4 Ohio State 6.4] (uscho.com).

-St. Cloud State, Minnesota Duluth and Minnesota State land No. 1 NCAA hockey seeds (by Randy Johnson at startribune.com).

-NCAA men’s hockey tournament: Tiering all 16 teams, Frozen Four picks (by Chris Peters at espn.com).

    Update: illustrations for the 2019 Frozen Four: UMass Minutemen, Denver Pioneers, Providence Friars, Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs.

Teams below shown in the order of their qualifying…

2019 Frozen Four – UMass Minutemen. Their 1st Frozen Four appearance.

umass-minutemen_2019-frozen-four_h_.gif
Photo and Image credits above –
Filip Lindbergh makes a save, photo by Charle Krupa via gazettenet.com. Players celebrate 1st goal, photo by Charle Krupa via gazettenet.com. John Leonard makes it 2-0, photo by Charles Krupa via bostonglobe.com/sports. Screenshot of Cale Makar slap shot goal, image from video at ncaa.com/video. Cale Makar celebrating after goal, photo by Melissa Wade at uscho.com/photo-gallery-umass. Players file onto ice to celebrate, photo by Charles Krupa via bostonherald.com. Players celebrate, photo from umassathletics.com/news. umasshoops.com/newboard/[logos 7 wordmarks, 2016].

2019 Frozen Four – Denver Pioneers. Their 16th Frozen Four appearance (and first since their 2017 D-1 Tournament title).

denver-pioneers_2019-frozen-four_c_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Screenshot from @DU_Hockey via denverpost.com. Photo and Image credits above – Colin Staub celebrates goal, photo by Michael Vosburg via duluthnewstribune.com/sports. Screenshot of Liam Finley scoring, from video at ncaa.com/video. Filip Larsson makes a save, photo by Michael Vosburg via therinklive.com. Denver players celebrate, photo by Michael Vosburg via therinklive.com.

2019 Frozen Four – Providence Friars. Their 5th Frozen Four appearance (and first since their 2015 D-1 Tournament title).

providence-friars_2019-frozen-four_b_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Greg Printz scores, photo by Kris Craig at providencejournal.com/sports. Josh Wilkins scores, photo by Melissa Wade at uscho.com. Scott Conway celebrates after scoring, photo by Kris Craig at providencejournal.com/sports. Goalie Hayden Hawkey, photo by Eldon Lindsay/Cornell Athletics via cornellsun.com. Players celebrate win, image from abc6.com.

2019 Frozen Four – Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs. Their 7th Frozen Four appearance (and the 3rd straight Frozen 4 appearance for the 2018 D-1 Tournament champions).

minnesota-duluth-bulldogs_2019-frozen-four_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Screenshot of Peter Krieger about to score, from video at ncaa.com/video. Peter Krieger celebrates scoring, photo by Omar Phillips at uscho.com/gallery. Screenshot of Kobe Roth about to score, from video at ncaa.com/video. Roth and teammates celebrate goal, photo unattributed at duluthnewstribune.com/sports. Jersey logo, photo by totalhockey.com/product/Minnesota-Duluth_Bulldogs_Jersey. Jersey shoulder-patch-logo (Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge shoulder patch), image from theumdstatesman.com/blog.

    2019 D-1 hockey tournament: 15 teams from 6 conferences + 1 Independent.

The #1-seeds. St. Cloud  State (1) [NCHC], Minnesota Duluth [NCHC], Minnesota State [WCHA], Massachusetts (UMass) [Hockey East].

Many of the big college hockey teams have been shut out of the 2019 D-1 NCAA tournament. Failing to make it were…Michigan (with a record 9 titles and 25 Frozen Four appearances); the 2016 champions North Dakota (the highest-drawing D-1 team, with 8 titles and 16 Frozen Fours); Wisconsin (the 2nd-best-drawing D-1 team, with 6 titles and 11 Frozen Fours); Boston College (with 5 titles, and a joint-best 25 Frozen Four appearances); Minnesota (5 titles, 21 Frozen Fours); and Boston University (5 titles, 22 Frozen Fours).

Minnesota Duluth, the reigning champions, return. The Bulldogs have now made it to 5 consecutive D-1 tournaments (since 2015). Minnesota Duluth draw 5th-best in D-1 hockey, at 6.0 K in their 6.7-K-capacity arena. Minnesota Duluth won their first title in 2011, and have made 6 Frozen Four appearances.

Only one hockey power with more than a couple titles to their name has made it to the 2019 tournament…the Denver Pioneers. Denver won the title two years ago (2017), and Denver have won a joint-second-best 8 titles (plus 15 Frozen Fours). The burgundy-and-gold-clad Pioneers have now made it to an impressive 12 straight D-1 tournaments (since 2008). The Denver Pioneers, who have to compete with the NHL’s Colorado Avalanche for the local puck-fan-dollar, draw a solid 5.5 K in their 6.0-K arena (9th-best attendance in D-1 hockey).

And speaking of college hockey teams located in NHL towns, it bears mentioning Ohio State. The Buckeyes, who share their city with the NHL’s Columbus Blue Jackets, have now made it to the D-1 tournament for a third straight year, following their 2018 Frozen Four appearance. And then in 2018-19, the Buckeyes saw a big attendance increase: they drew over a thousand more per game (going from 5.3 K in 2017-18, to 6.4 K in 2018-19).

Massachusetts (UMass) is another team that made the 2019 tournament after seeing a big attendance increase: up 1.8 K per game. The Minutemen, of Amherst, MA, were drawing 2.5 K four years ago; last season they drew 3.0 K; and then this season they drew 4.8 K (which was 12th-best in D-1). And the Minutemen were selected as one of the #1-seeds. UMass has only ever made one other D-1 tournament appearance (in 2007). This is yet another example of the competitiveness in D-1 hockey these days.

Returning teams (10 teams). Here are the 10 teams that qualified for the tournament in 2018, and have qualified again in 2019…
[∙#-of-consecutive-appearances, Name. Conference. Location(s).]
∙2x, Clarkson Golden Knights. ECAC Hockey. Potsdam, NY.
∙3x, Cornell Big Red. ECAC Hockey. Ithaca, NY.
∙12x, Denver Pioneers. NCHC. Denver, CO.
∙5x, Minnesota–Duluth Bulldogs. NCHC. Duluth, MN.
∙2x, Minnesota State Mavericks. WCHA. Mankato, MN.
∙2x, Northeastern Huskies. Hockey East. Boston, MA.
∙4x, Notre Dame Fighting Irish. Big Ten. Notre Dame, IN].
∙3x, Ohio State Buckeyes. Big Ten. Columbus, OH.
∙6x, Providence Friars. Hockey East. Providence, RI.
∙2x, St. Cloud State Huskies. NCHC. St. Cloud, MN.

Debut teams (2 teams). Here are the 2 teams that have qualified for the D-1 tournament for the first time…
-American International Yellow Jackets. Atlantic Hockey. Springfield, MA.
-Arizona State Sun Devils. Independent. Tempe, AZ/Glendale, AZ.
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for small segments of jersey illustrations of some teams (Minnesota-Duluth, Ohio State, UMass), such as at File:CCHA-Uniform-OSU.png.
-Thanks to contributors at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NCAA_Division_I_Men%27s_Frozen_Four_appearances_by_team; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NCAA_Division_I_men%27s_ice_hockey_champions#Team_titles.

-Thanks to Cornell store, for photo of jersey-script-logo, cornellstore.com/Hockey-Jersey-Red.
-Thanks to Game Worn Auctions for photo of UMass jersey-script-logo, gamewornauctions.net.
-Thanks to Quinnipiac bookstore for Q-logo photo, bkstr.com/.
-Thanks to Northeastern Huskies on twitter, for new logos, twitter.com/[@gonuathletics].
-Thanks to Minnesota State Mavericks site for photo of gold jersey script-logo, msumavericks.com/index.
-Thanks to WCHA online shop, for photo of Minnesota State-Mankato Mavericks banner logo, unrl.co/collections/mankato/products/mavericks-hockey-basefit-hat-white.
-Thanks to USCHO site for attendance data, Men’s Division I Hockey Attendance: 2018-2019 (uscho.com).
-Thanks to CollegeHockeyNews.com, for articles, info & live scores.
-Thanks to eliteprospects.com for stats (eliteprospects.com/league/ncaa).

March 17, 2019

2019 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament (aka March Madness) – the 68 teams: map, with team locations & 2017-18 average attendances listed.

Filed under: NCAA Men's Basketball — admin @ 8:35 pm

2019_ncaa-bk-tournament_march-madness_68-teams_map_posthb_.gif
2019 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament (aka March Madness) – the 68 teams: map, with team locations & 2017-18 average attendances listed



By Bill Turianski on 17 March 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-Teams, etc…2019 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament.
-Scores…Div I college bk scores (espn.go.com).

The 68 Teams which qualified for the 2019 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament [aka March Madness]
Listed by: Name. Conference. Location of arena(s)…

Abilene Christian Wildcats. Southland. Abilene, TX.
Arizona State Sun Devils. Pac-12. Tempe, AZ.
Auburn Tigers. SEC. Auburn, AL.
Baylor Bears. Big 12. Waco, TX.
Belmont Bruins. Ohio Valley. Nashville, TN.
Bradley Braves. Missouri Valley. Peoria, IL..
Buffalo Bulls. Mid-American. Amherst, NY.
Cincinnati Bearcats. American. Cincinnati, OH.
Colgate Red Raiders. Patriot. Hamilton, NY.
Duke Blue Devils. ACC. Durham, NC.
Fairleigh Dickinson Knights. Northeast (NEC). Hackensack, NJ.
Florida Gators. SEC. Gainesville, FL.
Florida State Seminoles. ACC. Tallahassee, FL.
Gardner-Webb Runnin’ Bulldogs. Big South. Boiling Springs, NC.
Georgia State Panthers. Sunbelt. Atlanta, GA.
Gonzaga Bulldogs. West Coast. Spokane, WA.
Houston Cougars. American . Houston, TX.
Iona Gaels. Metro Atlantic (MAAC). New Rochelle, NY
Iowa Hawkeyes. Big Ten. Iowa City, IA.
Iowa State Cyclones. Big 12. Ames, IA.
Kansas Jayhawks. Big 12. Lawrence, KS.
Kansas State Wildcats. Big 12. Manhattan, KS.
Kentucky Wildcats. SEC. Lexington, KY.
Liberty Flames. Atlantic Sun. Lynchburg, VA.
Louisville Cardinals. ACC. Louisville, KY.
LSU Tigers. SEC. Baton Rouge, LA.
Marquette Golden Eagles. Big East. Milwaukee, WI.
Maryland Terrapins. Big Ten. College Park, MD.
Michigan Wolverines. Big Ten. Ann Arbor, MI.
Michigan State Spartans. Big Ten. East Lansing, MI.
Minnesota Golden Gophers. Big 12. Minneapolis, MN.
Mississippi [Ole Miss] Rebels. SEC. Oxford, MS.
Mississippi State Bulldogs. SEC. Starkville, MS.
Montana Grizzlies. Big Sky. Bozeman, MT.
Murray State Racers. Ohio Valley. Murray, KY
Nevada Wolf Pack. Mountain West. Reno, NV.
New Mexico State Aggies. WAC. Las Cruces, NM.
Northeastern Huskies. Colonial (CAA). Boston, MA.
Northern Kentucky Norse. Horizon. Highland Heights, KY.
North Carolina Tar Heels. ACC. Chapel Hill, NC.
North Carolina Central Eagles. Mid-Eastern (MEAC). Durham, NC.
North Dakota State Bison. Summit, Fargo, ND.
Ohio State Buckeyes. Big Ten. Columbus, OH.
Oklahoma Sooners. Big 12. Norman, OK.
Old Dominion Monarchs.Conference-USA. Norfolk, VA.
Oregon Ducks. Pac-12. Eugene, OR.
Prairie View A&M Panthers. Southwestern (SWAC). Prairie View, TX.
Purdue Boilermakers. Big Ten. West Lafayette, IN.
St. John’s Red Storm. Big East. Queens, NYC, NY /Manhattan, NYC, NY.
Saint Louis Billikins. Atlantic 10. St. Louis, MO.
Saint Mary’s Gaels. West Coast (WCC). Moraga, CA.
Seton Hall Pirates. Big East. East Orange, NJ/Newark, NJ.
Syracuse Orange. ACC. Syracuse, NY.
Temple Owls. American. Philadelphia, PA.
Tennessee Volunteers. SEC. Knoxville, TN.
Texas Tech Red Raiders. Big 12. Lubbock, TX.
UCF (Central Florida) Knights. American. Orlando, FL.
UC Irvine Anteaters. Big West. Irvine, CA.
Utah State Aggies. Mountain West. Logan, UT.
VCU (Virginia Commonwealth) Rams. Atlantic 10. Richmond, VA.
Vermont Catamounts. America East. Burlington, VT.
Villanova Wildcats. Big East. Villanova, PA /Philadelphia, PA.
Virginia Cavaliers. ACC. Charlottesville, VA.
Virginia Tech Hokies. ACC. Blacksburg, VA.
Washington Huskies. Pac-12. Seattle, WA.
Wisconsin Badgers. Big 12. Madison, WI.
Wofford Terriers. Southern. Spartanburg, SC.
Yale Bulldogs. Ivy League. New Haven, CT.

The states with the most qualified teams in the tournament are Virginia, New York, and Texas, with 5 teams each…
-State of New York: Buffalo, Colgate, Iona, St. John’s, Syracuse.
-Commonwealth of Virginia: Liberty, Old Dominion, Virginia Commonwealth, Virginia, Virginia Tech.
-State of Texas: Abilene Christian, Baylor, Houston, Prairie View A&M, Texas Tech.
___
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to the contributors to the pages at en.wikipedia.org, ‘2019 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament’.
-Thanks to NCAA for attendance figures, from 2018 NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL ATTENDANCE (For All NCAA Men’s Varsity Teams) [pdf].
-Thanks to the Bracket Matrix site for bracket forecasting, bracketmatrix.com; twitter.com/@bracketproject.

March 11, 2019

2018-19 FA Cup 6th Round (Quarterfinals), map and attendance list with fixtures./+ illustration: each team’s manager & their top scorer.

Filed under: >2018-19 FA Cup — admin @ 8:23 am

2018-19_fa-cup_map_6th-round_map-of-the-8-clubs_w-current-attendances-in-league_fixture-list_post_c_.gif
2018-19 FA Cup 6th Round (Quarterfinals), map and attendance list with fixtures



By Bill Turianski on 11 March 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

-The competition…
-FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-2018-19 FA Cup, Final Stages (us.soccerway.com).
-BBC.com/fa-cup.

    2018-19 FA Cup 6th Round (Quarterfinals)/8 teams…
    Below: each team’s manager and their top scorer (goals scored, from all competitions in 2018-19, up to 15 March 2018)

2018-19_fa-cup_6th-round_8-teams_managers-and-top-scorers_brighton_crystal-palace_man-city_man-utd_millwall_swansea_watford_wolves_d_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Brighton: Chris Hughton, photo by Steve Bardens/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Glenn Murray, photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Crystal Palace: Roy Hodgson, photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Luka Milivojević, photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Man City: Pep Guardiola, photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images via bitterandblue.sbnation.com. Sergio Agüero photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Man Utd: Ole Gunnar Solskjær, photo unattributed at manchestereveningnews.co.uk/football. Romelu Lukaku, photo unattributed at manchestereveningnews.co.uk/football. Milwall: Neil Harris, photo from millwallfc.co.uk. Lee Gregory, photo unattributed at londonnewsonline.co.uk. Swansea City: Graham Potter, photo unattributed at swansea.vitalfootball.co.uk. Oliver McBurnie, photo by Athena Picture Gallery/Getty Images via hitc.com. Watford: Javi Gracia, photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images via telegraph.co.uk/football. Troy Deeney, photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Wolves: Nuno Espírito Santo, photo unattributed at birminghammail.co.uk. Raúl Jiménez [13 goals], photo by Getty Images via punditfeed.com.

___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Attendances from soccerway.com.
-2018-19 FA Cup (en.wikipedia.com).

March 3, 2019

2019 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 32-team Group Stage, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed); plus 2 charts: Libertadores titles by club & by country.

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 10:16 am

conmebol_copa-libertadores_2019_location-map_group-stage_32-teams_post_c_.gif"
2019 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the Group Stage, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed); plus 2 charts: Libertadores titles by club & by country



By Bill Turianski on 3 March 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2019 Copa Libertadores/Group Stage (en.wikipedia.org).
-Summary – CONMEBOL Libertadores [2019] (soccerway.com).

The Group Stage (of 32) begins on 5-7 March (1st game-week). The Group Stage lasts 2 months, and has 6 game-weeks, with the final game-week played on 7-9 May.
{2019 Copa Libertadores schedule.}

Qualified teams for the Group Stage, by country: Brazil has 7 teams (6+ Copa Sudamericana holder). Argentina has 6 teams (5+ Copa Libertadores holder). Chile, Paraguay, and Peru have 3 teams. The 5 other countries all have 2 teams each (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Venezuela).

The map…
Teams are shown in the two flanking sections on either side of the map, organized by country. Shown there in the country-groupings are each team’s all-time total Libertadores appearances (in the tan-colored column), and Libertadores titles (in the pale-blue-colored column).

Teams which had play to in the 3 Preliminary Stages [19 teams] are shown in italics (lowest-ranked qualifiers). From these 19 teams, only 4 qualified for the Group Stage of 32:
Atlético Mineiro (BRA), Libertad (PAR), Melgar (PER), Palestino (CHI).

At the far left of the map-page is the Libertadores titles list by club (25 clubs have won the Libertadores title). At the far right is the Libertadores titles list by country (of the 59 Libertadores titles, 25 have been won by Argentine teams, and 18 have been won by Brazilian teams).
___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-2019 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2017 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

Thanks to James Nalton at World Football Index.com for tweets & re-tweets {WFi}.

February 22, 2019

All-time Ligue Un (France/1st division): List of all clubs with at least one season in the French 1st division (81 seasons/since 1932-33/75 clubs); with French titles listed.

Filed under: >Football: All-time 1st Div,France — admin @ 9:31 am

france_1st-division-ligue-1_81-seasons_chart-of-all-time-most-seasons-in-french-1st-div_by-club_w-seasons_consec_titles_colours-and-crest_post_h_.gif
All-time Ligue Un (France/1st division): List of all clubs with at least one season in the French 1st division (81 seasons/since 1932-33/ 74 clubs); with French titles listed




By Bill Turianski on 22 February 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Sources…
Seasons in French 1st Division:
-Historical Review Ligue 1 (pari-et-gagne.com/[Bilan historique Ligue 1].
-Total Seasons Ligue 1 (ligue1.com/bilanClubs).
-France – Final Placings [all-time 1st division, 1932/33 to 2012/13] (rsssf.com).
-Classement du championnat de France de football toutes saisons confondues (fr.wikipedia.org).
-Ligue 1/Ewige Tabelle (de.wikipedia.org).
-Ligue 1/Members for 2018-19 (en.wikipedia.org).
French titles (Professional Era):
-List of French football champions/Performance by club in Professional era (en.wikipedia.org).

-Links to my other All-time 1st division charts [2018-19 season]
-England: All-time Football League/Premier League (since 1880-81).
-Italy: All-time Serie A (since 1929-30.
-Germany: All-time Bundesliga (since 1963-64).
-Spain: All-time Ligue 1 (since 1932-33).

    This chart is for All-time French 1st division: total seasons by club.

{Click on image at the top of this post.}
Going from left to right on the chart, here is what is listed on the chart…
1). Name of club.
2). Level (aka division) that the club is in, currently [2018-19].
3). Crest & colours [home colours from 2018-19].
4). Seasons in French 1st Division (Ligue 1): 81 seasons (1932-33 to 1938-39; 1945-46 to 2018-19).
5). Consecutive seasons in the 1st division [current/2018-19] – OR – Last season that the club was previously in the 1st division.
6). Ligue 1 clubs for 2018-19 are shown with crest and small home kit illustration [charcoal-grey column down the middle of the chart].
7). Full name of club.
8). French professional titles: Ligue 1 titles [80 seasons] (1933-2018).

The histories of many French 1st division clubs are rather convoluted, and it is disputed whether some clubs were re-formed with the original club’s history intact – or not. So the list here has 75 clubs, and not 77 clubs, because of Montpellier and Troyes. On the list here, Montpellier HSC’s league history (37 seasons in 1st division) includes the league history of SO Montpellier (1919-70/10 seasons in 1st division); and ESTAC Troyes’ league history (17 seasons in 1st division) includes the league history of AS Troyes (1900-67/3 seasons in 1st division). The sources I used that stick to this interpretation are this: {Historical Review Ligue 1 (pari-et-gagne.com)}, and this: {Ligue 1/Ewige Tabelle [Montpellier SO/HSC: #19/37 seasons; Troyes AS/ES: #33/17 seasons (de.wikipedia.org)]}. Worldfootball.net also considers Montpellier HSC as the same club as in the past {Montpellier HSC » Historical results}, ditto Troyes {ESTAC Troyes » Historical results}. You can find other examples, like this Danish site’s pages on Montpellier [est. 1919], and Troyes [est. 1900] {foot-dk}. French wikipedia (as well as German, English and Italian wikipedia) say Montpellier HSC was est. 1919, but the Spanish wikipedia disagrees, and says Montpellier HSC was est. 1974. French and English wikipedia say ESTAC Troyes was est. 1986, but German and Italian wikipedia both disagree, and say ESTAC Troyes was est. 1900. Soccerway.com says Montpellier HSC was established in 1974, and ESTAC Troyes was established in 1986. Rsssf.com says both Montpellier’s and Troyes’ 1st division clubs are not the same {rsssf.com/tablesf/[france]}.

To add to the confusion, en.wikipedia and fr.wikipedia both say that the present-day Montpellier HSC was founded in 1919, and were a founding member of the French 1st division in 1932 {see this: Montpellier Hérault Sport Club (fr.wikipedia.org)}. But when it comes to tabulating how many seasons Montpellier HSC has played in the 1st division, it is claimed that SO Montpellier’s 10 seasons in the 1st division don’t count towards Montpellier HSC’s total 1st division seasons. This site (thefinalball.com) does the same thing…go to the 1932-33 Ligue 1 page there, {here}, click on ‘Montpellier’ there, and you are re-directed to the Montpellier page which says ‘est. 1974′. That is a contradiction. You can’t have it both ways…if the current Montpellier is considered a founding member of Ligue 1, than it is the same club as the one that existed in 1932. Here is a screenshot that shows that en.wikipedia considers Montpellier HSC to be a founding member of Ligue 1 {ligue-1_founders_montpellier-hsc_listed-as-a-founding-club_.gif}, thus effectively admitting that Montpellier HSC, despite re-births and mergers throughout the years, is the same club as SO Montpellier. Ditto fr.wikipedia.org, which states, in the second sentence on the page of Montpellier HSC, ‘les Montpelliérains participent à la première édition du championnat national professionnel en 1932 en compagnie de dix-neuf autres clubs pionniers’.

If you are curious about other points of contention in Ligue 1 club league history, you can see what the web-master at Pari-et-Gagne.com has to say, at the foot of the Seasons in the French 1st Division list there {here: pari-et-gagne.com/bilan}. I agreed with all the points made there, except with respect to Lyon OU, who played one season of French 1st division football in 1945-46. Lyon OU still exists as a sports club, albeit as a 1st-division rugby union club. So how could the present-day Olympique Lyonnais [Lyon] inherit the Ligue 1 league history of Lyon OU, since Lyon OU still exists? They’re just playing with a different shaped ball now.
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Historical Review Ligue 1 (pari-et-gagne.com/[Bilan historique Ligue 1].
-Total Seasons Ligue 1 (ligue1.com/bilanClubs).
-France – Final Placings [all-time 1st division, 1932/33 to 2012/13] (rsssf.com).
-Classement du championnat de France de football toutes saisons confondues (fr.wikipedia.org).
-Ligue 1/Ewige Tabelle (de.wikipedia.org).
-Ligue 1/Members for 2018-19 (en.wikipedia.org).
French titles (Professional Era):
-List of French football champions/Performance by club in Professional era (en.wikipedia.org).
-Small kit illustrations of 2018-19 Ligue Un teams from each club’s page at en.wikipedia.org.

February 14, 2019

2018-19 FA Cup 5th Round Proper- map with fixture list & chart of Clubs by Division (w/ crowd-sizes)./+Biggest upsets in FA Cup 4th Round: AFC Wimbledon 4-2 West Ham Utd (58 place-difference); Newport County 2-0 Middlesbrough [replay] (56 place-difference).

Filed under: >2018-19 FA Cup — admin @ 1:22 pm

2018-19_fa-cup_map_5th-round_map-of-the-16-clubs_w-current-attendances-in-league_fixture-list_clubs-by-division_post_d_.gif
2018-19 FA Cup 5th Round Proper- map with fixtures list & chart: Clubs in the Round, by Division (w/ crowd-sizes)



By Bill Turianski on 14 February 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-The competition…FA Cup .
-2018-19 FA Cup 5th Round (us.soccerway.com).
-BBC.com/fa-cup.


Below: chart of Clubs by Division (w/ crowd-sizes)
2018-19_fa-cup_5th-round_qualified-clubs_by-division_with-crowd-sizes_c_.gif
Attendances from soccerway.com.

    Biggest upsets in FA Cup 4th Round:
    AFC Wimbledon 4-2 West Ham Utd (58 place-difference); Newport County 2-0 Middlesbrough [replay] (56 place-difference).

Below: 3rd-division AFC Wimbledon beat West Ham, a club 2 levels and 58 places higher…
Supporter-owned club AFC Wimbledon, in last place in the 3rd tier, beat West Ham, a Premier League club placed 2 divisions and 58 places above them. AFC Wimbledon qualify for the FA Cup 5th Round for the first time in their 16-year history. (In the 5th round of the Cup, on Saturday the 16th of February, AFC Wimbledon will host Millwall.)
2018-19_fa-cup_4th-round_afc-wimbledon_4-2_west-ham-utd_sun-26-jan-2019_k-appiah_s-wagstaff_t-sibbick_h_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – K Appiah after scoring, photo unattributed at goal.com. S Wagstaff after scoring 2nd goal, photo by Daniel Hambury/PA via theguardian.com/football/live. A Wordsworth assist on T Sibbick goal, screenshot from video uploaded by the Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com. T Sibbick goal, photo by Daniel Hambury/PA Wire via irishtimes.com/english-soccer. 18/19 Wimbledon jersey from shop.afcwimbledon.co.uk. Wimbledon players celebrate with supporters, from photo from afcwimbledon.co.uk/news.

Below: 4th-division Newport County beat Middlesbrough, a club that was 2 levels and 56 places higher…
Newport County’s recent FA Cup upsets:
-Beat Leeds United in the 3rd Round (Jan. 2018).
-Took Tottenham Hotspur to a replay in the 4th Round (Feb 2018).

-Beat Leicester City in the 3rd Round (Jan. 2019).
-Took Middlesbrough to a replay in the 4th Round, and won (Feb 2019).

(In the 5th round of the Cup, in the late game on Saturday the 16th of February, Newport County will host Manchester City.)
2018-19_fa-cup_4th-round-replay_newport-county_2-0_middlesbrough_tues-5-feb-2019_r-wilmott_p-amond_m-flynn_t-pulis_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – R Wilmott scores, photo by Getty Images via dailymail.co.uk/football. Goal off corner, screenshot from video uploaded by the Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com. Willmott and Amond, photo by Getty Images via telegraph.co.uk/football. Newport fans, photo by Nicola Johns, @nicnacnoopixs, Newport County AFC at southwalesargus.co.uk. Flynn embacing Pulis, screenshot from video uploaded by the Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com.

___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of West Midlands, by Nilfanion, at File:West Midlands UK relief location map.jpg -Attendances from us.soccerway.com.
-2018-19 FA Cup (en.wikipedia.com).

February 8, 2019

All-time La Liga (Spain/1st division): List of all clubs with at least one season in the Spanish 1st division (88 seasons/since 1929/63 clubs); with Spanish titles listed.

Filed under: >Football: All-time 1st Div,Spain — admin @ 9:45 am

spain_1st-division_la-liga_88-seasons_chart-of-all-time-most-seasons-in-spanish-1st-div_by-club_w-seasons_consec_titles_colours-and-crest_post_k_.gif
All-time La Liga (Spain/1st division): List of all clubs with at least one season in the Spanish 1st division (88 seasons/since 1929/62 clubs); with Spanish titles listed.




By Bill Turianski on 8 February 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Sources…
-Spanish Premier Division All-Time Table 1928-2018 (87 Leagues) [up to 2017-18] (rsssf.com).
-Anexo:Clasificación histórica de la Primera División de España [up to 2017-18] (es.wikipedia.org).
-La Liga/Performance by club [titles] (en.wikipedia.org).
-laliga.es/kits-for-2018-19.

-Links to my other All-time 1st division charts [2018-19 season]
-England: All-time Football League/Premier League (since 1880-81).
-Italy: All-time Serie A (since 1929-30.
-Germany: All-time Bundesliga (since 1963-64).

    This chart is for All-time Spanish 1st division: total seasons by club.

{Click on image at the top of this post.}
Going from left to right on the chart, here is what is listed on the chart…
1). Name of club.
2). Level (aka division) that the club is in, currently [2018-19].
3). Crest & colours [home colours from 2018-19].
4). Seasons in Spanish 1st Division (La Liga): 88 seasons (1929 to 1935-36; 1939-40 to 2018-19).
5). Consecutive seasons in the 1st division [current/2018-19] – OR – Last season that the club was previously in the 1st division.
6). La Liga clubs for 2018-19 are shown with crest and small home kit illustration [tan column down the middle of the chart].
7). Full name of club.
8). La Liga titles: Spanish titles [87 seasons] (1929-2018). Only 9 clubs have won the Spanish title.

There are 63 clubs that have played in the Spanish first division since it was established in 1929. Three clubs that were founding members have played all 88 seasons, and have never been relegated – Real Madrid, Barcelona, and Athletic Club [Bilbao]. Ten clubs that have played in the Spanish 1st division are defunct.

Below are the 25 clubs in Spain with the most seasons played in the Spanish 1st division (La Liga)…
List below includes 4 things:
1) Seasons in 1st Division [divisional status in 2018-19 is noted, if club is not currently in 1st Div]. 2) Location. 3) Colours. 4) Average attendance (and attendance-change from 2017-18) {figures from 7 Feb 2019; source: soccerway.com }.

Joint-1st: Athletic Club [Bilbao]. 88 seasons. From Bilbao, the capital and largest city in the Basque Country. Colours: Red-and-White stripes with Black. 40.6 K per game (up +3.2 K).

Joint-1st: Barcelona. 88 seasons. From Barcelona, the 2nd-largest city in Spain, and the capital of the autonomous community of Catalonia; they are located in the western part of the city, in the district of Les Corts. Colours: Dark-Blue-and-Garnet-Red stripes with Gold trim. 73.8 K per game (highest-drawing club in Spain) (up +8.0 K).

Joint-1st: Real Madrid. 88 seasons. From Madrid, the largest city and capital of Spain; they are located in the wealthy Chamartín district in downtown Madrid. Colours: All-White with various random trim colours. 62.3 K per game (2nd-highest-drawing club in Spain) (down -3.2 K).

Joint-4th: Valencia. 84 seasons. From Valencia, the 3rd-largest city in Spain, and the capital of the the autonomous community of Valencia. Colours: White with Black. 39.3 K per game (up +0.6 K).

Joint-4th: Espanyol. 84 seasons. From Cornellà de Llobregat, which is in the south-west of Greater Barcelona. Colours: Blue-and-White stripes. 18.6 K per game (up +0.9 K).

6th: Atlético Madrid. 82 seasons. From Madrid, located east of the city-centre, in the Rosas neighborhood of the San Blas-Canillejas district. Colours: Red-and-White stripes with Blue. 57.0 K per game (up +1.5 K).

7th: Sevilla. 75 seasons. From Seville, the 4th-largest city in Spain, and the capital of the autonomous community of Andalusia. Colours: All-White with Red trim and Black socks. 36.4 K per game (up +3.3 K).

8th: Real Sociedad. 72 seasons. From the city of San Sebastián, in the Basque Country, about 12 miles (20 km) from the French border. Colours: Blue-and-White stripes. 22.3 K per game (up +2.6 K).

9th: Zaragoza. 58 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division.] From Zaragoza, in the autonomous community of Aragorn (in northeastern Spain). Colours: White with Dark-Blue. 20.9 K per game [highest-draw in the 2nd division] (up +2.2 K).

Joint-10th: Celta Vigo. 53 seasons. From Vigo, in the autonomous community of Galicia, in northwest Spain. Colours: Pale Blue with White. 16.2 K per game (up +0.5 K).

Joint-10th: Betis. 53 seasons. From Seville, Andalusia. Colours: Bright-Green and White. 47.2 K per game [4th-highest-drawing team in Spain, currently] (up +0.7 K).

12th: Deportivo La Coruña. 46 seasons. [Relegated in 2018, and currently in the 2nd division.] From A Coruña, in Galicia, in northwest Spain. Colours: Blue-and-White stripes. 16.6 K per game (down -4.0 K).

13th: Racing Santander. 44 seasons. [Currently in the 3rd division.] From Santander, the capital of the autonomous community of Cantabria, on the north coast of Spain. Colours: Green with Black. Their current attendance is unavailable, because the Spanish 3rd division does not report attendance figures.

14th: Valladolid. 43 seasons. [Promoted to 1st division in 2018.] From Valladolid, in the autonomous community of Castile and León (which is in north-central Spain). Colours: Pale-Purple-and-White stripes. 18.2 K per game (up +7.7 K).

15th: Sporting Gijón. 42 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division.] From Gijón, the largest city in the autonomous community of Asturias (in northern Spain). Colours: Red-and-White stripes with Blue. 19.3 K per game (down -1.3 K).

16th: Oviedo. 38 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division.] From Oviedo, the capital of Asturias (in northern Spain). Colours: Blue with White. 13.9 K per game (about the same as last season).

17th: Osasuna. 37 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division.] From Pamplona, Navarre (which is the capital of the autonomous community of Navarre, and is the 2nd-largest city in the Greater Basque cultural region). Colours: Red with Dark-Blue. 13.9 K (up about 0.1 K).

18th: Las Palmas. 34 seasons. [Relegated in 2018, and currently in the 2nd division.] From the Canary Islands (in the Atlantic Ocean, located about 60 miles (~100 km) west of Morocco]. Colours: Yellow with Blue. 13.7 K per game (down -2.3 k).

19th: Mallorca. 27 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division; promoted from 3rd div in 2018.] From Palma, which is in the Balearic Islands (an archipelago off the coast of eastern Spain in the Mediterranean Sea). Colours: Red with Black. 7.5 K per game (attendance change from 2017-18 unavailable, due to Mallorca being in the 3rd tier last season).

20th: Granada. 23 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division.] From Granada, at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains in Andalusia. Colours: Red-and-White stripes with Blue. 10.1 K per game (down -0.7 K).

21st: Elche. 21 seasons. [Currently in the 2nd division; promoted from 3rd div in 2018.] From Elche, which is in the southern part of the Valencian autonomous community. Colours: White with Green trim. 9.6 K per game (attendance change from 2017-18 unavailable, due to Elche being in the 3rd tier last season).

Joint-22nd: Hércules. 20 seasons. [Currently in the 3rd division.] From Alicante, a city in the southern part of the Valencian autonomous community. Colours: Blue-and-White with Black. Their current attendance is unavailable, because the Spanish 3rd division does not report attendance figures.

Joint-22nd: CD Málaga (1904-92/defunct). 20 seasons. Club was dissolved in 1992; replaced by current-2nd-division side CF Málaga (who have played 17 seasons in the Spanish 1st division).

24th: Villarreal. 19 seasons. From the small city of Villarreal (population of around 51,000), located about 40 miles (65 km) north of Valencia. Colours: All-Yellow with Blue trim. 16.3 K per game (down -0.3 K).

25th: Rayo Vallecano. 18 seasons. [Promoted to 1st division in 2018.] From the neighborhood of Vallecas, in Punte de Vallecas, which is a district in the southeast of Madrid. Colours: White-with-Red-sash and Black. 11.8 K per game (up +2.4 K).

___
Thanks to all at the links below…
Sources:
-Spanish Premier Division All-Time Table 1928-2018 (87 Leagues) [up to 2017-18] (rsssf.com).
-Anexo:Clasificación histórica de la Primera División de España [up to 2017-18] (es.wikipedia.org).
-La Liga/Performance by club [titles] (en.wikipedia.org).
-laliga.es/kits-for-2018-19.
-Small kit illustrations from each team’s page at en.wikipedia.org.

January 30, 2019

NFL 1962 season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Green Bay Packers./+ Chart: NFL teams’ helmet-logos and changes in design in a 10-year span (1953 to 1962 seasons).

Filed under: NFL>1962 map/season,NFL/ Gridiron Football — admin @ 3:07 pm

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NFL 1962 season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders





By Bill Turianski on 30 January 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1962 NFL season
-1962 NFL Championship Game (en.wikipedia.org).
-1962 NFL season (pro-football-reference.com).
-1962 NFL uniforms (gridiron-uniforms.com).

    In 1962, the Green Bay Packers repeated as champions.
    This was start of the Packers historic run of 5 NFL titles in 7 seasons (1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, 1967).

The season before, in 1961, the Green Bay Packers, under third-year head coach Vince Lombardi, had won their first NFL title in 18 years (their last title had been won in 1944). In the 1961 NFL title game, the small-town Packers had demolished the big-city New York Giants 36 to 0, at the then-4-year old City Stadium [now called Lambeau Field] in Green Bay, WI. (Population of Green Bay in 1960: 62,000 {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bay,_Wisconsin#Demographics}.) Although the Packers had a decent new stadium, one which was capable of expansion, the fact still remained that the Green Bay NFL franchise was the last vestige of the small-town era of the NFL (1920-34).

The small-town Green Bay Packers were a team that played in a league that was becoming exponentially more popular each year. Every NFL or AFL team in 1962 played in a city that was at least 10 times larger than tiny and isolated Green Bay. Even the creation of the new rival-league the AFL, which started up in 1960 with 8 teams, had not changed that fact. (The NFL had 14 teams as of 1962, so by 1962, there were 22 major-league pro football teams in the USA.) Yet by 1962, many cities ten times the size of Green Bay still did not have an NFL or AFL team, and they were clamoring for one.

1962 NFL Championship Game – Green Bay Packers 16, New York Giants 7.
In 1962, both the Packers and the Giants had repeated as conference [divisional] winners. The Packers went 13-1, winning the West by 2 games and losing only to the 2nd-place-finishing Lions. The Giants went 12-2, winning the East by 3 games, with losses to the 2nd-place Steelers and to the 3rd-place Browns. The Packers’ offense, which was the league’s best in ’62 (at 29.6 points per game) was built on a strong ground game. The Packers starting QB was Bart Starr, and they were led offensively by FB Jim Taylor, and HB/K Paul Hornung, but Hornung was partially injured in 1962. Jim Taylor led the league in rushing yards, yards from scrimmage, and TDs, and was voted the NFL’s MVP in 1962. The Packers’ main receiving threat was WR/P Max McGee, and TE Ron Kramer was an All-Pro in ’62. The Packers’ defense was best in the league as well, allowing just 10.5 points per game. There were 5 All-Pros in the 1962 Packers’ D: linemen Willie Davis and Henry Jordan, LBs Bill Forester and Dan Currie, and CB/KR Herb Adderley. The Giants were almost as high-scoring as the Packers (at 28. 4 ppg). The Giants were led at QB by former 49er YA Tittle, and Tittle led the NFL in TD passes in 1962. Tittle’s main targets were End Del Shofner, HB Frank Gifford, and TE Joe Walton. The Giants were coached by Allie Sherman, who was in his second season.

Due to the rotating home-field-advantage rule in the NFL back then, it was the Eastern Conference’s turn to host the NFL title game, so that meant the New York Giants would be playing the Packers at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, NY, on Sunday, December 30, 1962. (It was the 3rd time in 7 years that Yankee Stadium hosted the NFL title game [previously in 1956 and 1958].) Green Bay was favored by 6½ points.

(Yankee Stadium was where the Brooklyn-born Vince Lombardi, former Offensive coach of the Giants (from 1954-58), had first established his pro football coaching credentials. That is why the Packers-at-Giants 1962 NFL title game was so important to Lombardi.)

The game was played under severely cold conditions: temperature was 17 °F (−8 °C), with 35 mph winds. The conditions made throwing the ball difficult.

The game was a hard-fought and low-scoring affair. Although the NY Giants slightly out-gained the Packers, Green Bay caused 3 turnovers (2 fumbles and one interception). Packers MLB Ray Nitschke (#66) recovered both fumbles, and Nitschke also had a pass deflection which caused the interception. Nitschke was selected as MVP of the game. Packers FB Jim Taylor (#31) ran for 85 yards, plus he gained 20 yards receiving, and Taylor scored the Packers’ only TD. The Packers defense did not allow New York to score on them (the Giants’ TD was scored by their special teams, off a blocked punt in the 3rd quarter).

The Packers’ Guard Jerry Kramer (#64) was also their replacement Kicker in 1962. (Kramer replaced partially-injured HB/K Paul Hornung.) In the 1962 NFL title game, Jerry Kramer’s kicking game proved to be the difference, as he converted all 3 of his FG attempts (of 26, 29, and 30 yards). Those 3 Field Goals were no chip-shots, due to the 35-40 mph winds. Here is an article, {Packers vs. Giants in the 1962 NFL Championship Game: Jerry Kramer Does It All, by Bob Fox at bleacherreport.com from Nov. 2011.} (Jerry Kramer was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame by the Seniors Committee, in 2018.)

With Green Bay beating the Giants in the 1962 title game, the Packers had just made straight 3 NFL title-game appearances, winning two of them. But the New York Giants had just made 4 NFL title-game appearances in 5 years…and they had lost all 4 times (losing to Baltimore in 1958 and ’59, and losing to Green Bay in 1961 and ’62). And the Giants would lose, again, in the title-game the following season (losing to the Bears, in 1963).

green-bay-packers_1962_nfl-title-winners_packers-16_ny-giants-7_yankee-stadium_vince-lombardi_ray-nitschke_jim-taylor_jerry-kramer_h_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Packers 1962 and NY Giants 1962 helmets, illustrations by gridiron-uniforms.com/[1962]. Vince Lombardi on the sidelines at Yankee Stadium, photo by Neil Leifer at neilleifer.com. Nitschke stopping Giants’ Alex Webster, photo by Neil Leifer at neilleifer.com. Nitschke recovering fumble, photo by Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel at archive.jsonline.com. Ray Nitschke, photo unattributed at cmgww.com/football/nitschke. . Jim Taylor scoring in 1962 NFL title game, photo by Vernon Biever via nydailynews.com/sports. Jerry Kramer, photo by Frank Rippon via packers.com. Jerry Kramer kicking a FG in 1962 title game, photo unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com. Packers congratulating Kramer after his 4th quarter FG, screenshot of video from nfl.com/videos.

1962 Green Bay Packers: 10 All-Pro players; plus 10 from the ’62 Packers were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Note: All-Pro, below, means: 1962 AP, 1st team.
-Jim Taylor (FB): 1962 All-Pro, and 1962 MVP [AP]; Taylor was inducted to the HoF in 1976.
-Forrest Gregg: 1962 All-Pro (T); Gregg was inducted into the HoF in 1977.
-Herb Adderley: 1962 All-Pro (CB/KR); Adderley was inducted into the HoF in 1980.
-Willie Davis: 1962 All-Pro (DE); Davis was inducted into the HoF in 1981.
-Jim Ringo: 1962 All-Pro (C); Ringo was inducted to the HoF in 1981.
-Jerry Kramer: 1962 All-Pro (G/K); Kramer was inducted to the HoF in 2018.
-Dan Currie: 1962 All-Pro (LB).
-Bill Forester: 1962 All-Pro (LB).
-Henry Jordan: 1962 All-Pro (DT).
-Ron Kramer: 1962 All-Pro (TE).
-Bart Starr (QB); Starr was inducted into the HoF in 1977.
-Ray Nitschke (LB); Nitschke was inducted into the HoF in 1981.
-Paul Hornung (HB/K); Hornung was inducted to the HoF in 1986.
-Vince Lombardi (Head coach of the Packers from 1959-67). Lombardi was inducted into the HoF in 1971.

    Helmet changes in 1962 NFL: Bears, 49ers, and Steelers introduce helmet logos (see further below).

The chart below shows NFL teams’ helmet-logos and changes in design, in a 10-year span (1953 to 1962 seasons). This was the time period that saw the most drastic changes in helmet logo design in the NFL. By 1962, the iconography of NFL teams had been set. And with very few exceptions, the helmet logo-designs of each of the 14 NFL teams of 1962 have not changed much at all to this day…only Washington’s helmet is different today, while the Cowboys and the 49ers changed helmet colors [both did so in 1964]).

Below: NFL teams 1953 to 1962: Helmet logo-design changes (10-season-span)
NFL teams (franchises) listed in order of establishment. Helmet-logo-changes are indicated by an arrow, with date shown.
Click on image below for full-size chart…
nfl_helmets_helmet-design-changes_all-teams_from_1953_to_1962_post_c_.gif
NFL teams 1953 to 1962: Helmet logo-design changes (10-season-span)
Helmet illustrations from gridiron-uniforms.com.

1962: Chicago Bears introduce their helmet-logo (a wishbone-shaped-C), on their midnight blue helmet.

Below: Chicago Bears’ helmet evolution (since the post-War era/1946-2018)…
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Bears helmets from gridiron-uniforms.com/[CHI].

1962: San Francisco 49ers introduce their helmet-logo (S-F-in-football), on a silver helmet.
(Two years later, in 1964, the 49ers would introduce their S-F-in-football logo, on a gold helmet.)

Below: San Francisco 49ers’ helmet evolution (since their inception in the AAFC in 1946/1946-2018)…
san-francisco-49ers_helmets_1946-2018_b_.gif
49ers helmets from gridiron-uniforms.com/[SF].

1962: the Pittsburgh Steelers introduce their helmet-logo (the US Steel Steelmark), on their gold helmet.
(One year later, in 1963: the Steelers would introduce their revised Steelmark logo, on a black helmet.)

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Photo and Image credits above – researchgate.net.

In January of 1960, the U.S. Steel Corp. introduced the Steelmark logo. The original Steelmark logo was a grey-edged circle enclosing three hypocycloids (diamonds with inward-curving edges) with the word ‘Steel’; the three star-shapes were in yellow, orange and blue. It was used to promote the steel industry, both in print ads and on labels on the steel products themselves. Throughout the Sixties and the Seventies the Steelmark logo was on labels of American-made steel products ranging from kitchenware to filing cabinets to steel tanks to tricycles. In 1962, Republic Steel of Cleveland, a co-owner of the Steelmark logo, approached the Pittsburgh Steelers organization about using the Steelmark logo in their football uniforms. The Steelers debuted the Steelmark logo on their gold helmets in the 10th week of the 1962 NFL season, on Sunday the 18th of November (the Steelers beat Washington 32-21 that day).

So the Pittsburgh Steelers new helmet-logo, with their first version of the Steelmark logo, was worn for the last 5 games in 1962. The orange star from one of the the original designs was replaced with a red star (making the 3 stars Yellow, Red, and Blue). The logo was worn on only the right side of the gold 1962 Steelers helmet. The reason for this was because the team was not sure the look would be popular. So the equipment manager of the Steelers was instructed to affix the Steelmark logo-decals to only the right-side of the helmets, in case the helmets didn’t look good (so that there would be less work scraping them off, if they didn’t look OK). Well, they looked fine.

pittsburgh-steelers_steelmark-logo_helmet-1962_1963_k_.gif
Steelers helmets from gridiron-uniforms.com/[PIT].

Encouraged by the success of the Steelmark-logo helmet, the Steelers decided to try it out on a black helmet. And so 8 weeks later, the Steelers introduced their now-iconic black-helmet-with-Steelmark-logo, on Jan. 6 1963, in the exhibition-game called the Playoff Bowl, versus the Lions, in Miami, FL. The helmet was simply a reverse of their existing helmet: black-with-a-gold-stripe instead of gold-with-a-black-stripe.

For the next season of 1963, the Steelers petitioned the Steelmark logo’s owner, the American Iron and Steel Institute, to let the football team change the word ‘Steel’ in the logo to ‘Steelers’. Also, the outside grey circle on the logo was made a lighter grey, and was a wider ring. The Steelers added small white player-numbers to the front of the helmet (the team had worn large player-numbers on the sides of their helmets from 1957-61/ see helmet-logos chart further above to see that).

The Steelers never placed the Steelmark-logo on the left side of their helmets. The Steelers have worn this helmet design since September 1963. The only changes made have been…1) the Steelers changed from grey facemasks to black facemasks, in 1977; and 2) they made the blue star a tiny bit darker, in 2002 {sportslogos.net/Pittsburgh_Steelers}.

___
Photo and Image credits
Packers players on map page,
Reproduction of early-1960s Packers helmet, from ebay.com. Early-1960s Packers pennant, from sports.mearsonlineauctions.com. Bart Starr & Jim Taylor, photo by George Silk/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Jerry Kramer [photo circa 1963], unattributed at pinterest.com. Jim Ringo [photo circa 1962], unattributed at thegridfe.com. Jim Taylor & Forrest Gregg [SI cover from Sept. 1962], from si.com/vault. Willie Davis [photo circa 1964], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Henry Jordan [1961 Topps card], from ebay.com. Dan Currie [photo circa 1963], photo unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com. Ray Nitschke, photo by Sports Illustrated via lombardiave.com. Bill Forester [1962 Topps card], unattributed at pinterest.com. Herb Adderley [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Ron Kramer [photo circa 1963], unattributed at pinterest.com.

Offensive stats leaders on map page,
Eddie LeBaron [photo from 1961], photo by Neil Leifer via gettyimages.com. Sonny Jurgensen [photo from 1963], photo by Neil Leifer via gettyimages.ae. YA Tittle [photo from 1961], photo by Neil Leifer via si.com/vault. Jim Taylor [photo circa 1965], photo by Getty Images via 247sports.com. Bobby Mitchell [photo circa 1962], unattributed at pinterest.com. Frank Clarke [1962 Post card], from amazon.com.


-Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to the contributors at pro-football-reference.com
-Thanks to the contributors at NFL 1962 season (en.wikipedia.org).
Special thanks to Tim Brulia, Bill Schaefer and Rob Holecko of The Gridiron Uniform Database, for giving billsportsmaps.com the permission to use football uniforms illustrations from Gridiron Uniform Database {GUD}.

January 23, 2019

2018-19 FA Cup 4th Round Proper- map with current league attendances & fixture list./+Biggest upset in FA Cup 3rd Round: Sheffield Utd 0-1 Barnet.

Filed under: >2018-19 FA Cup — admin @ 4:12 pm

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2018-19 FA Cup 4th Round Proper- map with current league attendances & fixture list




By Bill Turianski on 23 January 2019; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-The competition…FA Cup .
-2018-19 FA Cup 4th Round (us.soccerway.com).
-BBC.com/fa-cup.

Update
FA Cup 4 R Saturday 26 Jan 2019 – Upsets
Wins:
AFC Wimbledon 4-2 West Ham Utd (Wimbledon: 58 places lower)
Millwall 3-2 Everton (Millwall: 28 places lower)

Draws:
Middlesbrough 1-1 Newport County (Newport: 56 places lower)
Shrewsbury Town 2-2 Wolves (Shrewsbury: 54 places lower)

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Chart: Clubs in the 4th Round, by Division (with current league crowd-sizes shown)…

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Attendance figures from soccerway.com.

    Biggest upset in 2018-19 FA Cup 3rd Round – Sheffield Utd 0-1 Barnet
    Barnet (of the 5th division/National League) were 84 league-places and 3 divisions lower than 2nd-division side Sheffield United…

Barnet FC. Est. 1888. Nick-name: the Bees. Ground: The Hive. Capacity 6,500 (5,419 seated). Canons Park, northwest London Borough of Harrow. Colours: Orange and Black. Located, by road, about 6 miles (10 km) south-west of the club’s former location in Barnet.

Barnet have played 21 seasons in the Football League.
Barnet were in the Southern League when they became a founding member of the 5th division in 1979 {Alliance Premier League 1979-80}. In 1990-91, under longtime manager Barry Fry, Barnet won promotion to the 4th Division of the Football League. This was in the 5th year that an automatic promotion-spot, into the Football League, was allocated to the 5th division. Barnet won the Conference by 2 points over Colchester United in 1991. And then, 2 years later, in their second season in the Football League, Barnet won promotion again, to the 3rd division (in 1992-93). Barnet went back down to the 4th tier the next season (’93-94).

Barnet ended up staying 10 seasons in the Football League (1991-2001), with relegation to non-League [the Conference] in 2001. Their peak attendance was in their debut season in the League in 1991-92, at 3.6 K per game. It took Barnet 5 years to get back to the League, which they did in 2004-05, winning the 5th division with ease, 12 points ahead of Hereford United. At this point (2005-06), Barnet were drawing 2.2 K per game. Barnet’s second spell in the Football League lasted 8 seasons, all in the lower-half of the 4th division table. So you could say that it was becoming an ingrained fact that it was an uphill battle for Barnet to maintain League status. Relegation back to non-League came in 2013. It just so happened that this came about exactly as Barnet were about to leave their home of over 100 years, Underhill Stadium (1907-2013).

2013: Barnet are relegated out of the League again, and re-locate from Barnet to Harrow…
Underhill Stadium was famous for its sloped pitch. It was also the home of the Arsenal reserves. After the club’s 100-year lease expired, an ongoing dispute with Barnet Council forced the club to eventually sell the ground, and look elsewhere for a new home {see images and captions further below}. The club had to re-locate to find a suitable set-up. Barnet’s new venue, the Hive, is in the adjacent borough of Harrow, about 6 miles away (by road). They have plenty of room there for training fields, which they are able to rent out. (Note: the Hive is on the London Metro’s Jubilee Line, at the Canons Park station, which happens to be 3 stops north of Wembley Stadium, the site of the FA Cup Final {see map and aerial photo below}.)

Barnet’s 2013 relegation-/and-re-location did not drastically reduce crowd-size that much in 2013-14, given that a drop-off in crowds is to be expected when a club loses League status. {See Barnet attendance chart in the illustration below.} Barnet ended up dropping about 700 per game (down from 2.4 K in League Two, to 1.7 K in the Conference). It only took Barnet two seasons, this time, to re-gain promotion to the League, which was done in 2014-15, with Barnet beating out Bristol Rovers by one point for the Conference title. Barnet then ended up with a 3-season stint in the Football League, once again finishing in the lower half of League Two the whole way.

On the 5th of May 2018, for the third time in their history, Barnet were relegated out of the League, on goal difference (Morecambe survived). Barnet have become somewhat of a League/non-League yo-yo club, with two relegations out of the League since 2013. But 5 years later, relegation, this time, has hit Barnet harder…attendance has dropped around one-thousand-per-game (down from 2.2 K in League Two, to 1.2 K, currently, in the National League). In August 2018, Barnet started their fourth stint in non-League, and went winless in their first 5 games. They have recovered, and sit in 16th place with 4 games in hand (at the close of January 2018). But survival, and not a promotion push, is the best that can be salvaged. In other words, Barnet will be stuck in non-League next season. And Barnet just lost their manager, John Still [age 68], who retired a few days after Christmas in 2018. The 44-year-old Darren Currie, who was Still’s assistant coach, has taken over as caretaker manager.

Yet while their National League campaign was sputtering, Barnet were putting together a decent Cup run…
On 3 November, in front of 1.7 K at the Hive, Barnet held on to a 1-1 score versus 3rd-vision side Bristol Rovers. Then in the replay, they beat Rovers 1-2 at the Memorial Stadium in Horfield, Bristol, on Wednesday 21st November 2018. Goals were scored by MF Craig Robson in the 75th minute, and by substitute FW Byron Harrison two minutes later, on an assist by MF Dan Sparkes (77′).

Then a late-November 2nd Round draw, with 6th-tier-side Stockport County, saw Barnet win 1-0 at the Hive, in front of 2.8 K (with Stockport bringing down over one thousand traveling supporters). Barnet’s winning goal was scored in the 8th minute, by MF Dan Sparkes, on a header from a cross by DF Cheye Alexander.

Then in the FA Cup 3rd Round, Barnet were drawn, away, to 2nd-division-side Sheffield United…
Sheffield United, sitting 3rd in the Championship, and in a quest to return to the Premier League, might not have placed that high a priority on the FA Cup right then. But, regardless, the Blades went into the match 84 league-places and 3 divisions higher than Barnet. The Blades’ fanbase might not have prioritized the match either, as there were just 9.9 K in attendance there at Brammall Lane. That figure included 966 traveling Barnet fans, who made the 160-mile journey up north, to South Yorkshire. Barnet scored the winner in the 21st minute on a penalty, scored by FW Shaq Coulthirst. To win the penalty, Coulthirst had threaded a pass to 19-year-old LW Ephron Mason-Clark, who was brought down in the box by a lunging Richard Stearman. Barnet held on for the win, greatly aided by a 89th-minute point-blank save that ‘keeper Mark Cousins made on a header by Blades’ FW Leon Cousins {see screenshots below}.

In the 4th Round draw, as just rewards for a brilliant 3rd Round Cup-upset, Barnet got a nice 4th Round tie, versus fellow London side Brentford.
Brentford, who are also nick-named the Bees, are in 17th place in the Championship. Brentford’s Griffin Park in West London is located only about 8 miles south of the Hive. The match will be played at the Hive, on Monday night, the 28th of January. The match was, of course, selected for television broadcast, and it is sold out.

barnet_underhill_move-to-harrow_the-hive_league-history_c_.gif
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Photo and Image credits above – Barnet 18/19 small kit illustrations, from en.wikipedia.org/Barnet. Barnet 18/19 jersey illustration from historicalkits.co.uk/Barnet. Underhill Stadium, photo unattributed at dailymail.co.uk/football/article-Barnet-leave-Underhill-104-years. Aerial shot of the Hive from barnetfc.com. R Stearman penalty on E Mason-Jones, screenshot from video from streamable.com/4ms55 via reddit.com/soccer. Ephron Mason-Clark, photo by Gavin Ellis/TGS Photo via barkinganddagenhampost.co.uk. Penalty goal by Shaq Coalthirst, photo by Matt West via theguardian.com/football. Shaq Coalthirst, photo by James Williamson/AMA/Getty Images via hitc.com. GK Cousins’ save, and Mark Cousins after the save, screenshots from video uploaded by FA Emirates Cup at youtube.com. Traveling Barnet fans, photo by Mark Cosgrove/News Images/REX via dailymail.co.uk/football. Darren Currie & Barnet players thank the traveling fans, photo by Getty Images via dailymail.co.uk/football.

___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of West Midlands, by Nilfanion, at File:West Midlands UK relief location map.jpg -Attendances from us.soccerway.com.
-2018-19 FA Cup (en.wikipedia.com).

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