billsportsmaps.com

August 9, 2022

2022-23 EFL League One [3rd division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance chart./+ The 4 clubs promoted to League One in 2022…Forest Green Rovers, Exeter City, Bristol Rovers, Port Vale.

Filed under: >2022-23 English football,Eng-3rd Level/League One — admin @ 8:19 pm

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2022-23 EFL League One [3rd division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance chart




By Bill Turianski on the 9th of August 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2022-23 EFL League One (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, stats, attendances, etc…Summary – EFL League One [2022-23] (soccerway.com).
-League One 2022-23 preview: the contenders, hopefuls and strugglers (by Ben Fisher at theguardian.com/football).


2022-23 EFL League One [3rd division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance.
The map here is a new template, one which I will have for the top 4 divisions in England this year. The map is a basic location-map, with inset maps of both Greater London and Greater Manchester. Also shown are small labels which point out the four promoted clubs (Forest Green Rovers, Exeter City, Bristol Rovers, Port Vale). And there is an attendance chart.

The attendance chart shows 5 things for each of the 24 current League One clubs…A) 2021-22 finish (with relegations and promotions noted). B) 2021-22 average attendance [from home league matches]. C) Stadium capacity [2021-22]. D) Percent-capacity [2021-22]. E) Last time club had higher attendance [than 2021-22]. I added that last column (last time club had higher attendance), because last season there were a lot of clubs in the lower Football League and in non-League football that saw notable attendance increases. You can see an example of how well lower League clubs were drawing last season by simply by glancing at the percent-capacity column in the attendance chart here: 21 of the 24 current 3rd tier clubs filled their stadium last season more than halfway. (Clubs in the third tier very often are drawing to only 40% of capacity, or lower.)

2 clubs saw all-time-best average attendances last season, both from Lancashire: Morecambe, and Accrington Stanley. Morecambe, a small club from the northern Lancashire coast, had been promoted to the 3rd tier in 2021, and then last season drew 4.4-K-per-game (an increase of 1.9-K-per-game) {Morecambe FC attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}. Accrington Stanley are a small Lancashire club tightly wedged between two much-larger and titled clubs (Blackburn Rovers, and Burnley). Playing in their fourth-ever season in the 3rd tier last season, Accrington drew 2.9-K-per-game (an increase of around 60 per game).

And also last season, three other current League One sides saw their best attendance in three decades (or more): Peterborough United, and two clubs from the Oxbridge towns, Oxford United and Cambridge United. Last season Peterborough saw their best crowds in 58 years. The Posh drew 10.0-K-per-game despite being relegated from the 2nd tier (an increase of 2.7-K-per-game); it was Peterborough’s best attendance since 1963-64 {Peterborough United attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}. Last season, Oxford United drew 8.4-K-per-game in their 6th-consecutive season in the 3rd tier (an increase of about 825 per game); it was the U’s best attendance since 1986-87, when they were a (short-lived) 1st-division side {Oxford United attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}. And last season, Cambridge United drew 5.9-K-per-game in their first season back in the 3rd tier (an increase of around 1.6-K-per-game), which was Cambridge’s best attendance since 1991-92, when the club last played in the 2nd tier {Cambridge United attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}.

Below are illustrations for the 4 clubs which won promotion to the 3rd tier last season (Forest Green Rovers, Exeter City, Bristol Rovers, Port Vale)…

Forest Green Rovers – promoted to the 3rd division for the first time ever.
-Rob Edwards: Forest Green manager hails team unity after promotion (bbc.com/sport on 23 April 2022).
-Forest Green furious after Watford appoint Rob Edwards as manager (by Ben Fisher on 11 May 2022 at theguardian.com/football).
forest-green-rovers_promoted-to-league-one-2022_the-new-lawn_rob-edwards_ian-burchnall_f_.gif
Photo and Image credits – Nailsworth coat of arms, from heraldry-wiki.com. ’21-22 FGR home jersey, photo from footballkitarchive.com. Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, photo from stroudnewsandjournal.co.uk. Aerial shot of the New Lawn by Forest Green Rovers FC via weforum.org. FGR’s old ground, the Lawn (1890-2006), photo by Matt Bigwood via stroudtimes.com/a-photographic-tour-of-gloucestershires-football-grounds. Segment of map of English clubs by Bill Turianski athttp://billsportsmaps.com/?p=52691 [2022 attendance map]. Blank map of England by Nilfanion at File:England relief location map.jpg. -Rob Edwards, photo by Rex Features via bbc.com/sport. -Ian Burchnall, photo by FGR at fgr.co.uk/news. -Matty Stevens, photo by Getty Images via gloucestershirelive.co.uk/sport. -Kane Wilson, photo by Rex Features via bbc.com/sport. -Ebrima Adams, photo unattributed at newschainonline.com/sport. -Nicky Cadden, photo by PA Images at alamy.com. -Jamille Matt, photo by Dan Mullan/Getty Images via theguardian.com/football.




Exeter City – promoted back to the 3rd division after 11 years…
-Tue 26 Apr 2022 League Two – Exeter City 2-1 Barrow (by Brent Pilnick at bbc.com/sport).
-How Exeter City’s fan-owned model secured League Two promotion (by Brent Pilnick on 27 April 2022 at bbc.com/sport).
exeter-city_promoted-to-league-one-2022_st-james-park_matt-taylor_d_.gif
Photo and Image credits – ’21-22 Exeter City jersey, photo from shop.exetercityfc.com. Exeter coat of arms, from heraldry-wiki.com. Exeter on the River Exe, photo by Gavin Hellier at westend61.de. Aerial shot of St James Park (Exeter) from exetercityfc.co.uk/news. Drone-shot of St James Pak (Exeter) by Excel Aerials at youtube.com. -Matt Jay, photo from exetercityfc.co.uk/news. -Timothée Dieng, photo by shutterstock.com. -Jevani Brown, photo from devonlive.com/sport. -Captain Matt Jay after scoring the goal that got Exeter City promoted to the 3rd division, photo by Rex Features via bbc.com/sport. -Exeter City fans’ pitch invasion, screenshot from video uploaded by Exeter City Football Club at youtube.com.




Bristol Rovers – promoted back to the 3rd division after 1 year…
-Sat 07 May 2022 / League Two, Bristol Rovers 7-0 Scunthorpe United (bbc.com/sport).
-Bristol Rovers hit magnificent seven against Scunthorpe to clinch promotion (by Ben Fisher at theguardian.com/football on Sat 7 May 2022).
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Photo and Image credits above – 1982-88 Bristol Rovers crest from historicalkits.co.uk/Bristol_Rovers. 2021-22 Bristol Rovers home jersey, photo from subsidesports.com. -File:Bristol UK relief location map.jpg (by Nilfanion using Ordnance Survey Open Data at commons.wikipedia.org). -Memorial Stadium, photo unattributed at memorialgroundbristol.wordpress.com. -Eastville Stadium photo unattributed at bristolroversmemorabilia.weebly.com/[Eastville Stadium]. -Twerton Park (Bath), photo unattributed at twobluequarters.co.uk/grounds. -Joey Barton, photo by PA via dailymail.co.uk/sport. -Antony Evans scoring 6th goal of promotion-winning 7-0 victory over Scunthorpe (final day of season), photo unattributed at mirror.co.uk/sport. -Aaron Collins scoring 6th goal of promotion-winning 7-0 victory over Scunthorpe (final day of season), photo unattributed at bristolworld.com/sport. -Elliot Anderson scoring 7th goal of promotion-winning 7-0 victory over Scunthorpe (final day of season), photo by shutterstock.com. -2021-22 League Two final table, screenshot of image from soccerway.com/national/england/league-two/20212022. -Rovers boss Joey Barton asking fans to exit the pitch, photo unattributed at portsmouth.co.uk/sport. -Aerial view of Rovers fans’ pitch invasion, photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@Official_BRFC].




Port Vale – promoted back to the 3rd division after 5 years…
-Port Vale: A club revitalised by maximising the finer details (by Nancy Frostick at theathletic.com on 10 April 2022).
-Sat 28 May 2022 / League Two Play-off Final, Mansfield Town 0-3 Port Vale (by Andrew Aloia at bbc.com/football).
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Photo and Image credits above – Coat of Arms of Burslem, from thepotteries.org/arms/burslem. PVFC 2021-22 home jersey, from footballshirtculture.com. Conical bottle kilns at Furlong Lane, Middleport, Burslem – photo by Chris Oldham [2007] at thepotteries.org. Aerial shot of Vale Park, from alamay.com. -Darrell Clarke, photo by Tim Goode/PA Images via Getty Images via theathletic.com. -1st goal (Kian Harratt) and 3rd goal (Mal Benning) at Wembley, screenshots from video uploaded by Be In Sports Australia at youtube.com. -2nd goal at Wembley (James Wilson), photo by Getty Images via stokesentinel.co.uk/live. -As Port Vale fans cheer, teammates congratulate Mal Benning after scoring the goal that put Vale up 3-0, photo by John Walton/PA via theguardian.com/football/live.




___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Blank map of English Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Counties, by Nilfanion, at File:English metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties 2010.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England (en.wikipedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg (en.wikipedia.org).
-PFA League Two Team of the Year [2021].
-Historical attendance figures, european-football-statistics.co.uk.
-2021-22 attendance figures from worldfootball.net/attendance/eng-league-two-2021-2022
-Seasons in Football League by Club: Club League Divisional History Summary 1888-89 to 2020-21 (myfootballfacts.com);
fchd.info (Football Club History Database);
England – First Level All-Time Tables 1888/89-2018/19 (rsssf.com).
-Player-positions: transfermarkt.us.
-Distances: mapdevelopers.com/distance_from_to.php (mapdevelopers.com).
-2022 PFA League Two team of the year (thepfa.com).

July 24, 2022

2022-23 EFL League Two [4th division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance./+The 2 clubs promoted to the Football League in 2022…Stockport County: promoted back to the League after 11 years; Grimsby Town: promoted back to the League after 1 year.

Filed under: >2022-23 English football,Eng-4th Level/League Two — admin @ 7:15 pm

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2022-23 EFL League Two [4th division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance chart




By Bill Turianski on the 24th of July 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2022-23 EFL League Two (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, stats, attendances, etc…Summary – EFL League Two [2022-23] (soccerway.com).
-League Two 2022-23 preview: the contenders, hopefuls and strugglers (by Ben Fisher at theguardian.com/football).

2022-23 EFL League Two [4th division] – Location-map, with 2021-22 attendance.
The map here is a new template, one which I will have for the top 4 divisions in England this year. The map is a basic location-map, with inset maps of both Greater London and Greater Manchester. Also shown are small labels which point out the two promoted clubs (Stockport County, and Grimsby Town). And here is the part that makes this a new template: there is an attendance chart.

The attendance chart shows 5 things for each of the 24 current League Two clubs…A) 2021-22 finish (with relegations and promotions noted). B) 2021-22 average attendance [from home league matches]. C) Stadium capacity [2021-22]. D) Percent-capacity [2021-22]. E) Last time club had higher attendance [than 2021-22]. I added that last column (last time club had higher attendance), because last season there were a lot of clubs in the lower Football League and in non-League football that saw notable attendance increases. As far as current League Two sides go, 3 clubs saw all-time-best average attendances last season: AFC Wimbledon (at 7.7-K-per-game, in their new ground, and despite being relegated); Harrogate Town (at 2.3-K-per-game, in their 3rd season in the Football League); and Sutton United (at 3.0-K-per-game, in their first-ever season in the Football League). And a few clubs saw their best crowds in many years: Barrow AFC had their best attendance since 1969-70 (at 3.2-K-per-game); Newport County had their best attendance since 1983-84 (at 3.9-K-per-game); Stockport County had their best attendance since 1999-2000 [when they were a 2nd-division club], at 7.0-K-per-game; and Grimsby Town had their best attendance since 2002-03 [when they were a 2nd-division club], at 5.7-K-per-game. The last two clubs, as mentioned, were the two clubs promoted to the 4th division last season, and illustrations for them both can be seen below.

Stockport County – promoted back to the Football League after 11 years…
-Stockport County 2-0 FC Halifax Town (bbc.com/sport/football on 15 May 2022).
-It’s a Stockport County thing (by Holly Hunt at efl.com on 15 June 2022).
-Stockport seal National League title and EFL return after 11 years (by PA Media at theguardian.com/football on 15 May 2022).
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Photo and Image credits above – Coat of arms of the Town of Stockport, image from heraldry-wiki.com. Stockport County 2021-22 home jersey, photo from clubfootballshirts.com. St Petersgate bridge over Little Underbank, in the Underbank aka Stockports’s Soho, photo unattributed at britainallover.com. Drone-photo of Edgeley Park, by Stockport County at twitter.com/[@StockportCounty]. -Dave Challinor, screenshot from video uploaded by Stockport County at youtube.com. -Paddy Madden, screenshot from video uploaded by Stockport County at youtube.com. -Will Collar, screenshot from video uploaded by Stockport County at youtube.com. -Ben Hinchliffe, photo by Stockport County at stockportcounty.com/hinchliffes-county-journey-continues. -Stockport fans pitch invasion 15th May 2020, screenshot from video uploaded by Stockport County at youtube.com.




Grimsby Town – promoted back to the Football League after 1 year…
-Solihull Moors 1-2 Grimsby Town (AET) – Jordan Maguire-Drew winner sends Mariners back to EFL (by Chris Peddy at bbc.com/sport on 5 June 2022).
-Relegation, promotion and unbelievable drama – welcome to the Grimsby way (by Jason Stockwood at theguardian.com/football/blog on 25 July 2022).
-From @Official GTFC – [Winning goal, by Jordan Maguire-Drew, that sent Grimsby Town back to the League: 1:00 video.] (twitter.com/[@officialgtfc] on 3 July 2022).
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Photo and Image credits above – Coat of arms of Great Grimsby, from heraldry-wiki.com. Grimsby Town 2021-22 home jersey, photo by Lee Blease via grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/sport. Drone-photo of Blundell Park in Cleethorpes, photo by Joshua Adam via grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/news. Aerial shot of Blundell Park from gtfc.co.uk. -Paul Hurst, photo by Getty Images via lincolnshireworld.com/sport[Gallery]. -Kyle Hudlin, photo by Getty Images via bbc.com/sport/live. -John McAtee, and Jordan Maguire-Drew, photos by Getty Images via dailymail.co.uk/sport. -Grimsby Town fans at London Stadium, photo by Getty Images via lincolnshireworld.com/sport[Gallery].



___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Blank map of English Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Counties, by Nilfanion, at File:English metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties 2010.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England (en.wikipedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg (en.wikipedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of West Midlands, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:West Midlands UK relief location map.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-PFA League Two Team of the Year [2021].
-Historical attendance figures, european-football-statistics.co.uk.
-2021-22 attendance figures from worldfootball.net/attendance/eng-league-two-2021-2022
-Seasons in Football League by Club: Club League Divisional History Summary 1888-89 to 2020-21 (myfootballfacts.com);
fchd.info (Football Club History Database);
England – First Level All-Time Tables 1888/89-2018/19 (rsssf.com).
-Player-positions: transfermarkt.us.
-Distances: mapdevelopers.com/distance_from_to.php (mapdevelopers.com).
-2022 National League team of the year, twitter.com/[@TheVanaramaNL].

July 8, 2022

England (including Wales, and Isle of Man) – map of all football clubs drawing above 1,000 game (2021-22 attendance figures): 143 clubs, including 51 non-League clubs.

Filed under: >Eng-144 clubs' crowds,England — admin @ 5:00 pm

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England (including Wales, and Isle of Man) – map of all football clubs drawing above 1 K per game (2021-22 attendance figures): 143 clubs, including 51 non-League clubs.




By Bill Turianski on the 8th of July 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Sources…
-Article on defining the largest cities in the UK.. Where are the largest cities in Britain? (citymetric.com).
-List of metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom (en.wikipedia.org).
-Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England (en.wikipedia.org).
Attendance figures…
-worldfootball.net. (Average attendances last season from the 1st division through 4th division.)
-nonleaguematters.co.uk. (Average attendances last season of all non-League clubs, ie from 5th division down.)

The map shows all clubs in the English football system which drew above 1,000 per game in 2021-22 (home domestic league matches): 143 clubs, including 51 non-League clubs.
Also, there is an inset-map for all the clubs from Greater London-plus-the-immediate surrounding area (18 clubs from Greater London + 4 clubs from surrounding areas of the Home Counties). On the left-hand side of the map-page, the clubs are listed by average attendance, along with a column showing 3 things: league-level; 2021-22 league-finish; and promotion-or-relegation (green for promotion/red for relegation. On the right-hand side of the map-page are 2 charts showing the English football league system, aka the Pyramid. 2021-22 league details are from myfootballfacts.com.

(Note: in bold-17-to-36-point-type, on the map, are listed the 9 largest cities within England {all English cities with more than .6 million inhabitants/see first link above}…Greater London, Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool, Newcastle, Nottingham, Sheffield, Bristol. Also, in 12-to-15-point-type, on the map, are listed the 83 Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. Also, in 14-point-all-cap-bold-type, are listed prominent British regional names such as: the East Midlands, the West Midlands, East Anglia, the West Country, and the Lake District; as well as North Wales and South Wales.)




There were 143 clubs which drew above 1,000 per game in 2021-22, plus I added one club that came 2-per-game shy of that mark (Ilkeston Town, of Derbyshire). I included Ilkeston Town because there are almost always slight discrepancies in attendance figures from source to source, especially in non-League football, and 998 per game is just too close to one thousand to leave them off the map.

Of the 143 clubs that drew above 1-K-per-game last season, 11 are clubs which were not drawing above 1-K-per-game in the last two seasons of full attendance (which were 2018-19 and 2019-20, while 2020-21 was the season that COVID prevented full attendance). To the best of my knowledge, 9 of the 11 clubs listed below had never averaged above 1,000 per game, the two exceptions being Gateshead, and St Albans City. Below are those 11 clubs (with league-levels and locations listed)…
-Boreham Wood. 5th tier club. From Borehamwood in Hertfordshire, located about one mile north of the Greater London border and 12 miles north of central London. The Wood made it to the 5th Round of the FA Cup in March 2022. 4 years ago they made it to the National League play-off final (in 2018, losing to Tranmere). For 4 of their first 5 seasons in the 5th division (2015-20), Boreham Wood were the lowest-drawing 5th tier club; Boreham Wood finally drew above one thousand per game in 2021-22.
-Bury AFC. A new Phoenix-club. 10th tier, promoted to 9th tier. Are not playing at Gigg Lane (like the defunct Bury FC did), but at the at 3.5-K-capacity Stainton Park, in Radcliffe, 2.5 miles SW of Bury in Greater Manchester. Bury AFC drew 1.3-K per game in their first season, compared to the 4.0-K per game that Bury FC drew in their last season (2018-19) {BFC/BAFC attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}.
-Dorking Wanderers. Est. 1999. 6th tier, promoted to 5th tier. From Surrey. Dorking Wanderers have won 4 promotions in the last 6 seasons. In 2015-16, Dorking were a newly-promoted 8th tier club drawing 124 per game. In 2018-19, Dorking were a 7th tier club drawing 570 per game, and were promoted. In 2019-20, in their first season in the 6th tier, Dorking drew 703 per game, finishing in 7th. Then in ’21-22, Dorking drew 1,300 per game, won the play-offs, and now are a 5th division club.
-FC Isle of Man. A new club. 10th tier, promoted to 9th tier. From Douglas, the capital of the Isle of Man, in the Irish Sea. (The Isle of Man is a British Crown Dependency of the UK.) FC Isle of Man play at the Bowl (3.5-K-capacity), and the club pays travelling teams’ expenses. {Photos of the Bowl, here (twitter.com/[@christopher7590]).} In their first season in 2021-22, FC Isle of Man drew 1.6-K per game and won promotion via the play-offs. In ’22-23, they will play in the 9th tier NWCL Premier.
-Gateshead. 6th tier, promoted to 5th tier. From Tyne and Wear, just south of Newcastle. ‘The Heed’ drew above 1-K-per-game once before, in the 5th tier in 2014-15. 8 years ago, Gateshead made it to the 2014 Conference [National League] play-off final (losing to Cambridge United). Gateshead return to the National League in 2022-23, after they were demoted into the National League North in 2019 due to financial irregularities.
-Gloucester City AFC. 6th tier. From Gloucestershire. In 2021-22 they returned to Meadow Park in Gloucester after an exile of 13 years (in 4 different locations), and their average attendance increased over 700-per-game, to 1.1 K. Gloucester City have a sharp new badge.
-Hastings United. 8th tier, promoted to 7th tier. From the coast of East Sussex, 40 miles (by road) east of Brighton. Hastings made it to the 3rd Round of the FA Cup in 2012-13. They were drawing 400 per game last time they were in the 7th division (2012-13). Hastings got to 607 per game in 2019-20, and were in first place by 3 pts, when the season was abandoned due to COVID in March 2020. Hastings then doubled their crowd-size last season, drawing 1.2-K per game, and won the Isthmian South East by 13 pts.
-Macclesfield FC. A new Phoenix-club. 9th tier, promoted to 8th tier. Are playing at Moss Rose (the former home of the defunct Macclesfield Town, wound up in September 2020). They drew 3.3-K-per-game in their debut season, winning the 9th-tier North West Counties Football League by 15 points. Macclesfield FC’s average attendance in their first year was higher than the original Macclesfield ever drew {MTFC/MFC attendance history at european-football-statistics.co.uk}.
-Marine AFC. 8th tier, promoted to 7th tier. From Crosby in Merseyside, just north of Liverpool. Marine had reached the 3rd Round of the FA Cup in 2020-21, playing at home v Spurs (Marine were 7 league-levels and 161 league-places below Tottenham, the largest gap between teams in FA Cup history).
-St Albans City. 6th tier. From St Albans in Hertfordshire, located about 10 miles north of the Greater London border, and about 24 miles by road north of central London. St Albans drew above 1-K-per-game once before, in the 5th tier in 2006-07 (which was their only season in the 5th division). St Albans City beat Forest Green Rovers in the FA Cup 1st Round in November 2021. They finished in 9th place in the ’21-22 National League North, but St Albans still drew their best-ever at 1,290 per game.
-Worthing. 7th tier, promoted to 6th tier. From the coast of West Sussex, 14 miles (by road) west of Brighton. Worthing drew 600 a game when they first joined the Isthmian Premier in 2015-16. They got to 892 per game in 2019-20 and were in first by 7 pts, when the season was abandoned due to COVID in March 2020. Last season, Worthing won the league by 10 pts, and averaged 1.3-K (an increase of over 400), and are now a National League South club for the first time.

___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of English Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Counties, by Nilfanion, at File:English metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties 2010.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_football_league_system#Promotion_and_relegation_rules_for_the_top_eight_levels.
Attendance…
-worldfootball.net (1st division through 4th division).
-nonleaguematters.co.uk (all non-League from 5th division down).
Sources:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_football_league_system.
myfootballfacts.com/england_footy/football-league/english-football-pyramid-system.

June 27, 2022

2022 Copa Libertadores: map of Final Stages (16 teams, with match-ups)./+ All of the Round-of-16 stadiums, with club info.

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 11:47 am

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2022 Copa Libertadores: map of Final Stages (16 teams, with match-ups)



By Bill Turianski on the 27th of June 2022 ; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2022 Copa Libertadores/Final Stages (en.wikipedia.org).
-Summary – CONMEBOL Libertadores – Final Stages [2022] (soccerway.com).

The Round of 16
The first legs of the 2022 Copa Libertadores Round of 16 will be played from 28 to 30 June {click on the links at the top of this post for the fixtures}.

The breakdown of qualified clubs-by-country…
•Brazil: 6 clubs (Palmeiras, Flamengo, Atlético Mineiro, Fortaleza, Athletico Paranaense, Corinthians). This includes back-to-back reigning champions Palmeiras.
•Argentina: 6 clubs (River Plate, Estudiantes, Colón, Boca Juniors, Talleres, Vélez Sarsfield),
•Paraguay: 2 clubs (Libertad, Cerro Porteño).
•Colombia: 1 club (Deportes Tolima).
•Ecuador: 1 club (Emelec).

The Big 2 of Argentina and Brazil have placed 12 clubs into the Round of 16, just as the two did last year [2021]. This is the largest total Round-of-16 spots from the combined Brazil and Argentina, amounting to 75% of the teams that advanced.

This is the 5th-straight year that Paraguay have placed two clubs into the Round of 16. This is the 4th-straight year that Ecuador have placed at least one club into the Round of 16.

After 3 years without any of their clubs advancing past the Group stage, Colombia finally has a club back in the Round of 16. And this is now the second-straight year that Uruguay are without a club in the Round of 16. Chile has placed a club into the Round of 16 only once since 2018.

There are two clubs that have advanced from the Libertadores Group Stage for the first time…
fortaleza_jersey-badge_b_.gif
Fortaleza, from Fortaleza, capital of the state of Ceará, up in the northeast of Brazil. Fortaleza is the 11th-largest city in South America, with a metro-area population of around 3.9 million. Fortaleza made it to the Round of 16 thanks to a big away win (4-3) in their final group-stage game, versus Colo-Colo in Santiago, Chile (25 May). Fortaleza Esporte Clube, est. 1918, have played 24 seasons in the Brazilian top-flight, starting in 1959, but had never played in the Copa Libertadores. Five years ago, in 2017, stuck in the third division, Fortaleza won promotion from Série C. Four years ago, in 2018, Fortaleza won their second-straight promotion, finishing in 1st in Série B and drawing a 2nd-tier-best 29,400 per league match. Then three years ago, in 2019, Fortaleza were finally back in Série A, and were one of the highest-drawing Brazilian clubs, drawing 33,800 per league match. They finished in a decent 9th place in 2019. But in their second season back in the top tier, in 2020, Fortaleza almost got relegated, finishing in 16th and only avoiding the drop on goal-difference. However, last year, in 2021, Fortaleza had an amazing turnaround and finished in 4th place in the 2021 Brasileiro. That was good enough for Fortaleza to win their first-ever Copa Libertadores spot: an automatic qualification for the 2022 Libertadores group stage. Fortaleza wear blue-and-red-horizontally-striped jerseys. They play at the 63-K-capacity Castelão, which they share with local rivals Ceará Sporting Club (who are also currently a top-flight club).

talleres_jersey-badge_b_.gif
Talleres, of Córdoba, Argentina’s 2nd-largest city [metro-population: 1.5 million]. Talleres made it through the group stage rather easily, with only one loss (versus Flamengo in Rio de Janeiro), and they beat Chile’s Universidad Católica home and away. 2022 is the third time Talleres have qualified for the Libertadores, and only the second time they have made it to the Group Stage (previously in 2002). Talleres play at a little jewel of a stadium, the 13-K-capacity Estadio Francisco Cabasés, nicknamed ‘La Boutique‘, for its small and elegant design {1:20 video of the venue}. Talleres means ‘workshops’ in Spanish. CA Talleres were founded in 1913 by workers from the Córdoba Central Railway. Talleres have played 26 seasons of Argentine top-flight football, 7 consecutive since promotion back to the Primera División in 2016. Talleres wear dark-blue vertically-striped jerseys. They finished in 3rd place in the 2021 Primera División. Talleres are the only club from Córdoba to ever have qualified for the Copa Libertadores.



    Below: 2021 Libertadores Round of 16 venues – all 16 clubs’ stadiums…

#1 seed, back-to-back reigning champions Palmeiras – Allianz Parque (aka Palestra Itália), in São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
palmeiras_allianz-parque_-aka-palestra-italia-arena_sao-paulo-brazil_c_.gif
Photo credit above – twitter.com/[@AllianzParque].

#2 seed, River Plate – El Monumental (Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti), in the Belgrano district of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
river-plate_-el-monumental_buenos-aires-argentina_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Toni Lamberttuchi Fettuchini at google.com/maps/[photos].

#3 seed, Flamengo – Maracanã (Estádio Jornalista Mário Filho), in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
flamengo_maracana_-rio-de-janeiro_brazil_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Getty Images via eurosport.com.

#4 seed, Estudiantes de La Plata – Estadio Jorge Luis Hirschi, La Plata, Buenos Aires province, Argentina.
estudiantes_estadio-jorge-luis-hirschi_la-plata_argentina_e_.gif
Photo and image credits above – E de L P jersey badge, photo unattributed at footballshirtculture.com. Stadium drone image, unattributed at weekend.perfil.com/noticias/videos.



#5 seed, Atlético Mineiro – Mineirão (Estádio Governador Magalhães Pinto), in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
atletico-mineiro_mineirao_belo-horizonte_minas-gerais_brazil_n_.gif
Photo and image credits above – original badge from campeoesdofutebol.com.br/hist_atleticomg; photo by Prefeitura de Belo Horizonte at flickr.com.

# 6 seed, Libertad – Estadio Tigo La Huerta (aka Tuyukuá), in the Las Mercedes barrio of Asunción, Paraguay.
libertad_estadio-tigo-la-huerta_aka-tuyukua_asuncion-paraguay_e_.gif
Photo credit above – Francisco Caceres Sanchez [2019], at google.com/maps/[photos].

#7 seed, Colón – Estadio Brigadier General Estanislao Lopez (aka ‘El Cementerio de Los Elefantes’), in Santa Fe, Argentina.
colon_estadio-b-g-estanislao-lopez_santa-fe_argentina_f_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at tripadvisor.com.

#8 seed, Boca Juniors – La Bombonera (‘the Chocolate Box’), in La Boca district of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
boca-juniors_la-bombonera_-la-boca_buenos-aires_argentina_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at twitter.com/[@brfootball].



#9 seed, Deportes Tolima – Estadio Manuel Murillo Toro, in Ibagué, capital of the department of Tolima, central Colombia.
deportes-tolima_estadio-manuel-morillo-toro_ibague-colombia_c_.gif
Photo credit above – DobleJJO at google.com/maps/[photos].

#10 seed, Talleres – Francisco Cabasés Stadium, aka La Boutique de Barrio Jardín, in the Jardín Espinoza neighborhood of the city of Córdoba, Argentina.
talleres_la-boutique_cordoba-argentina_c_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at twitter.com/[@pavlito98t].

#11 seed, Fortaleza – Castelão (Estádio Governador Plácido Castelo), in Fortaleza, Ceará, northeastern Brazil.
fortaleza-ec_castelao_fortaleza-ceara-brazil_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Fábio Lima at File:Fortaleza Arena.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).

#12 seed, Athletico Paranaense – Arena da Baixada (aka Estádio Joaquim Américo), in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.
athletico-paranaense_arena-da-baixada_-curitiba-parana-brazil_c_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by Wassmansdorff at youtube.com.



#13 seed, Corinthians – Arena Corinthians (aka Neo Química Arena), in the eastern part of São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
corinthians_neo-quimica-arena_sao-paulo-brazil_c_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by One Man Wolf Pack at youtube.com.

#14 seed, Emelec – Estadio George Capwell, in Guayaquil, Ecuador.
emelec_estadio-george-capwell_guayaquil-ecuador_d_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at emelexista.com.

#15 seed, Vélez Sarsfield – Estadio José Amalfitani, in Liniers district of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
velez-sarsfield_-estadio-jose-amalfitani_liniers_buenos-aires_b_.gif
Photo credit above – velez.com.ar/club/estadio.

#16 seed, Cerro Porteño – Estadio General Pablo Rojas (aka La Olla; aka La Nueva Olla), in Asunción, Paraguay.
cerro-porteno_la-olla_-estadio-general-pablo-rojas_asuncion-paraguay_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Miryan O. Rodríguez at google.com/maps/[photos].



___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-2022 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2019 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

June 10, 2022

CHL (Canadian Hockey League): 2021-22 location-map of the 60 teams (18 QMJHL teams, 20 OHL teams, 22 WHL teams), plus chart: Memorial Cup Tournament Appearances & Titles by current CHL teams (2021).

chl_canadian-hockey-league_2021-22_location-map_60-teams_whl_ohl_qmjhl_w-memorial-cup-titles_post_b_.gif
CHL (Canadian Hockey League): 2021-22 location-map of the 60 teams (18 QMJHL teams, 20 OHL teams, 22 WHL teams), plus chart: Memorial Cup Tournament Appearances & Titles by current CHL teams (2021)



By Bill Turianski on the 10th of June 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-chl.ca.
-ontariohockeyleague.com.
-theqmjhl.ca. lhjmq.qc.ca (Fr).
-whl.ca.
-en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Memorial_Cup.

Canadian Hockey League (CHL): the umbrella-organization for the 3 leagues of Major Junior Hockey in Canada. The 3 leagues are: the Western Hockey League (WHL, est. 1966), the Ontario Hockey League (OHL, est. 1933), and the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL/ LMJHQ in French, est. 1969). 60 teams: in the CHL-system, there are 52 teams from Canada (from 9 Canadian provinces), and there are 8 teams from the USA (from 4 US states). The CHL as the umbrella-organization was established in 1975, but as mentioned, the three individual leagues were established earlier; see league side-bars on the upper-part of the map for more info.

CHL teams are for players aged 16-20. Two non-North-American-born players are allowed per team; overage, and underage player-waivers are sometimes allowed. Players receive stipend & board, and believe it or not, this actually qualifies as pay in the NCAA’s monopolistic view, so players who commit to an OHL or QMJHL or WHL team in the CHL-system become ineligible to play later on in the USA in the NCAA-system. Whereas around 30% of NHL players have had a US-collegiate career prior to signing in the NHL, a solid 47-to-48% of all NHL players originally played in Canadian Major Junior hockey {see this, from the Washington Post}.

The winners of the 3 leagues each season contest the Memorial Cup Tournament (est. 1919), which is usually played in the month of May. The Memorial Cup is a 4-team round-robin competition, which comprises the WHL champion, the OHL champion, the QMJHL champion, plus the host team. The past two tournaments were cancelled due to COVID, so this is the first tournament since 2018-19, when the Quebec league’s Rouyn-Noranda Huskies were Memorial Cup champions. Rouyn-Noranda is a small and isolated mining community of 42,000, 320 miles NW of Montreal. The Rouyn-Noranda Huskies beat the Halifax Mooseheads 4-2, in Halifax on May the 26th 2019, to win the title.

This year’s tournament [2022] will take place in St. John, New Brunswick from June 20-29, at the 6.3-K-capacity TD Station. The St. John Sea Dogs of the QMJHL are the host team. The St. John Sea Dogs won the Memorial Cup in 2011; this will be the team’s 4th appearance in the tournament.
•so, the St. John Sea Dogs are already in the tournament as host team. The other 3 teams to qualify are down to the following…
•WHL: Edmonton Oil Kings or Seattle Thunderbirds.
•OHL: Windsor Spitfires or Hamilton Bulldogs.
•QMJHL: Shawinigan (Quebec) Cataractes or Charlottetown (Prince Edward Island) Islanders.
Scores…CHL.ca.



The map is a location-map with the three league’s areas tinted.

The chart on the far-left-hand-side:
Memorial Cup Tournament Appearances & Titles by current CHL teams (2021)
-Number of Memorial Cup titles (including host-team status noted by italics).
-Number of Memorial Cup tournament appearances (including host-team status noted by italics).
26 of the 60 current CHL teams have won a Memorial Cup title. The most titles won by a current team is the 5 titles won by the Oshawa Generals (who last won it in 2015). The most tournament appearances is 16 appearances, by the oldest Major Junior hockey team, the Regina St. Pats (est. 1917). Note: in the chart, teams are listed, not franchises, thus Kootenay Ice’s one Memorial Cup title and 3 tournament-appearances do not carry over, when the franchise moved from British Columbia, to Winnipeg Manitoba, as the Winnipeg Ice, in 2019. So that makes it 7 for 7 in Canada: now all 7 Canadian cities with NHL teams (Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Ottawa, Winnipeg) also have a Major Junior hockey team. And with the debut of the NHL’s Seattle Kraken this season, Seattle is also in this category.

Other changes in teams and their gear since 2019 are the following…
-Cape Breton Screaming Eagles, in 2019, dropped the Screaming from their name and unveiled a smart new logo {Cape Breton Eagles}.
-Portland Winterhawks unveiled a new logo in 2021, dropping their long-time Chicago Blackhawks-derived logo, for one that features a hawk’s head superimposed over a grey mountain range with subtle ‘WH’ inscribed in the mountain’s crags {Portland Winterhawks}.
-Sarnia Sting dropped the disc logo and went back to classic full-wasp-with-hockey-stick design {sportslogos.net/[Sarnia Sting]}.
-Erie Otters went back to their original otter-with-helmet-&-stick logo, in just yellow-gold and navy (no red) {sportslogos.net/[Erie Otters].
-Everett Silvertips’s primary logo is now the green-silver-and-pale-brown shield-with-grizzley-head-&-mountain design {Everett Silvertips}, and their original primary logo (grizzley-with-stick-wordmark) is now their shoulder-patch logo.
___
Thanks to all at the following…
-en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Memorial_Cup.
-Canadian Hockey League (en.wikipedia.org).
-Photo of Memorial Cup (CHL), unattributed at hhof.com.
-Hockey ice photo from dreamstime.com.

May 31, 2022

Billsportsmaps’ 15th anniversary throwback: NFL 1920 to 1960 [hand-drawn map].

Filed under: 15th anniversary maps,NFL/ Gridiron Football,Retro maps — admin @ 7:40 pm

By Bill Turianski on the 31st of May 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-National Football League (en.wikipedia.org).
-Gridiron Uniforms Database: gridiron-uniforms.com.
-Sportslogos.net: sportslogos.net/[NFL].

    Billsportsmaps.com will have its 15th year anniversary, on the 17th of August 2022.

So to mark the 15th anniversary of my site, I am posting a series of maps from the early days of this blog. Here, I am re-posting my first-ever post {originally, here}. It is a hand-drawn map of the early days of the NFL. This map shows the prominent NFL teams of the period from 1920 to 1960.

    NFL 1920 to 1960 [hand-drawn map]

    nfl_chop2.gif

    There are 35 teams shown on the map. The criteria I used to determine which teams to include on the map, and which teams to leave out, was this: a team (franchise) had to have played at least 4 NFL seasons. So the map shows every NFL team which was established between 1920 and 1960, and which existed for at least 4 seasons.

    Franchise shifts are shown as well, with arrows indicating the franchise relocations. Those franchise relocations I showed on the map are:
    1) 1921: Decatur Staleys move from central Illinois, up to Chicago, to eventually become the Chicago Bears in 1922; 2) 1934: Portsmouth Spartans move from southern Ohio, up to Detroit, to become the Detroit Lions; 3) 1937: Boston Redskins move from Massachusetts, down to the nation’s capital, to become the Washington Redskins; 4) 1946: the reigning 1945 NFL champions the Cleveland Rams move all the way out to the West Coast, to become the Los Angeles Rams; 5) 1960: the Chicago Cardinals move down to Missouri to become the St. Louis football Cardinals.

    The evolution of the football helmet is depicted at the top of the map. The 6 helmets shown at the top of the map are, from left to right:
    1) a generic plain leather football helmet from the late 1910s/early 1920s; 2) Green Bay Packers yellow/gold-painted leather helmet (with multiple round air vents) circa late 1930s; Chicago Bears navy-blue-painted padded leather helmet from the 1940s; 4) Detroit Lions silver-painted plastic-shell helmet from the early 1950s; 5) Cleveland Browns orange plastic helmet with white center-stripe from the early 1950s; 6) Philadelphia Eagles green plastic helmet with silver eagle-wing decal and facemask circa late 1950s.

    Other images of note on the map:
    Helmets shown on the map:
    A) New York Giants dark-blue leather helmet with red-painted sunburst design from 1929; B) Philadelphia Eagles green leather helmet with wavy silver/white painted top section [aka the feather helmet], from 1942 to ’48; C) Los Angeles Rams dark-blue leather helmet with yellow/gold hand-painted rams’ horns design (made and painted by Rams’ Halfback Fred Gehrke) [which was the first helmet-logo in gridiron football history], from 1948; D) Washington Redskins burgundy plastic helmet with white-&-pale-red feather decal on the back-center of helmet, from 1958 to ’64; E) Dallas Cowboys first helmet, a white plastic helmet with a plain dark-blue star decal and two thin dark-blue center-stripes, from 1960 to ’63.

    Players shown on map:
    Inset-map of northeastern Ohio at the top of the map: Jim Thorpe in his Canton Bulldogs gear circa 1920, based on a famous photo, seen at his Wikipedia page, here. Central Illinois: George Halas in Chicago Staleys gear in 1921. This is an anachronism I was not aware of when I drew this map: a few years ago the Gridiron Uniforms Database unearthed the fact that the early Staleys/Bears teams wore red, and not navy-blue-and-orange until 1922. The uniform I have on the map wasn’t in use until 1928, and you can see that by scrolling through the first decade of the Bears’ uniform history, here. And finally, the player tossing the ball in the Packers’ logo on the map is not a particular player, but a generic player, and that is based on the team’s primary logo from the late 1950s, here.

    The list of the 35 teams shown on the map can be found at the foot of this post.




    The American Professional Football Association was formed in 1920, in Canton, Ohio. The APFA changed its name to the National Football League in 1922. Today, only two of the original 1920 franchises, the Decatur Staleys (now the Chicago Bears) and the Chicago Cardinals (now the Arizona Cardinals), remain as NFL franchises.

    The early days of the NFL were marked by franchise instability and public indifference. College football was far more popular, and club finances were further eroded by the onset of the Depression in the early 1930s. Many teams came and went. In fact, there wasn’t a balanced schedule until 1936. In other words, for the first 16 seasons of the NFL, some teams played more games than other teams, and scheduling games was left to the teams themselves (and not the league). The roster of defunct NFL teams would startle the average NFL fan of today. Very few fans who cozy up to their TV each autumn Sunday to watch pro football know that in the early 1930′s, New York City boasted three NFL teams: the New York football Giants, the Brooklyn football Dodgers, and the Staten Island Stapletons (NFL, 1929-32). Or that the list of teams that have won an NFL title include the Frankford Yellow Jackets, of Philadelphia, in (1926), and the Providence Steam Roller in (1928). Or that the Detroit Lions, est. 1934, began as the Portsmouth (Ohio) Spartans (1930-33). The league soldiered on through the Depression in the 1930s, and by the end of World War II, the NFL was poised for its future success. The post-War era saw the end of leather helmets in the late 1940s. And the post-Wa era also saw a more emphasized passing game, which helped gain more fan interest. By the late 1950′s, television coverage began turning the NFL into the sports entertainment juggernaut it is today.

    To see a list of defunct NFL teams that played for at least 4 seasons, click on the following:
    nfl_defunct-teams_that-played-at-least-4-years_1920-60_17-teams_post-c_.gif
    Chart by billsportsmaps 2022; Canton, Columbus, Dayton, Duluth, Frankford logos drawn by gridiron-uniforms.com/[Defunct Teams]; Milwaukee logo by Darth_Brooks at reddit.com/r/nfl/comments/Revising Defunct NFL Teams




    To see a list of all NFL teams (past and present) shown on the map, scroll down to the foot of this post, under the enlarged map below.

      NFL 1920 to 1960 [hand-drawn map]

    nfl-1920-1960map_b.gif

      The 35 NFL Teams on the map (which includes every NFL franchise established between 1920 and 1960 which existed for at least 4 seasons)…

    [Teams below listed by: years played, alphabetically, with {NFL titles up to 1960 listed} (and with franchise-shifts noted).]
    1920 APFA (NFL): 10 franchises est. 1920 on the map…
    •Akron Pros, of Akron, OH (1920-26; 1926 as Akron Indians {1920 APFA title}.)/ Defunct.
    •Buffalo All-Americans, of Buffalo, NY (1920-29; 1924 & ’25 as Buffalo Bisons; 1926 as Buffalo Rangers; 1928 team suspended operations {1921 disputed APFA title}./ Defunct.
    •Canton Bulldogs, of Canton, OH (1920-26; in 1924: played in Cleveland, OH as Cleveland football Indians {1922, 1923 NFL titles}.)/ Defunct.
    •Chicago Cardinals (1920-59; 1960: franchise moved to St. Louis, MO as the St. Louis football Cardinals (NFL, 1960-87) {1925, 1947 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day Arizona Cardinals (NFL, 1988- ).
    •Columbus Panhandles, of Columbus, OH (1920-26; 1923-26 as Columbus Tigers.)/ Defunct.
    •Dayton Triangles, of Dayton, OH (1920-29; 1930: franchise moved to Brooklyn NY, as Brooklyn football Dodgers (NFL, 1930-43; 1944 as Brooklyn Tigers.)/ Defunct.
    •Decatur Staleys, of Decatur, IL (1920; 1921: franchise moved to Chicago, IL as Chicago Staleys)./ Present-day Chicago Bears (NFL, 1921- ).
    •Hammond Pros, of Hammond, IN [Greater Chicago, IL]/ traveling team (1920-26.)/ Defunct.
    •Rochester Jeffersons, of Rochester, NY (1920-25.)/ Defunct.
    •Rock Island Independents, of Rock Island, IL (1920-25.)/ Defunct.
    1921 APFA (NFL): 2 new franchises and 1 relocated franchise est. 1921 on the map…
    •Chicago Staleys, of Chicago, IL (orig. est. 1920 as the Decatur Staleys (1920)/ 1921: franchise moved to Chicago, IL as the Chicago Staleys (1921); 1922: changed name to the Chicago Bears {1921, 1932, 1933, 1940, 1941, 1943, 1946 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day Chicago Bears (NFL, 1921- ).
    •Green Bay Packers, of Green Bay, WI (1921- {1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, 1944 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day Green Bay Packers (NFL, 1921- ).
    •Minneapolis Marines, of Minneapolis, MN (1921-24.)/ Defunct.
    1922 NFL: 1 franchise est. 1922 on the map…
    •Milwaukee Badgers, of Milwaukee, WI (1922-25.)/ Defunct.
    1923 NFL: 1 franchise est. 1923 on the map…
    •Duluth Kelleys, of Duluth, MN/ primarily a traveling team (1923-27; 1926: changed name to Duluth Eskimos.)/ Defunct.
    1924 NFL: 1 franchise est. 1924 on the map…
    •Frankford Yellow Jackets, of Frankford, a section of NE Philadelphia, PA (1924-31 {1926 NFL title}.)/ Defunct.
    1925 NFL: 3 franchises est. 1925 on the map…
    •New York football Giants, of Manhattan, NYC, NY (1925- {1927, 1934, 1938, 1956 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day New York Giants (1925- ).
    •Pottsville Maroons, of Pottsville, PA (1925-28 {1926 disputed NFL title}.)/ 1929: franchise moved to Boston, MA as Boston Bulldogs (1929)/ Defunct.
    •Providence Steam Roller, of Providence, RI (1925-31 {1928 NFL title}.)/ Defunct.
    1929 NFL: 1 franchise est. 1929 on the map…
    •Staten Island Stapletons, of Stapleton, NE Staten Island, NYC, NY (1929-32.)/ Defunct.
    1930 NFL: 1 new franchise & 1 relocated franchise est. 1930 on the map…
    •Portsmouth Spartans, of Portsmouth, OH (1930-33 {1932: lost 1st-ever NFL playoff game to Chicago Bears}.)/ 1934: franchise moved to Detroit, MI as the Detroit Lions (NFL, 1934- )./ Present-day Detroit Lions (NFL, 1934- ).
    •Brooklyn football Dodgers, of Brooklyn, NYC, NY (orig. est. 1920-29 as the Dayton Triangles of Dayton, OH/ 1930: moved to Brooklyn, NYC, NY as the Brooklyn football Dodgers; 1944 as Brooklyn Tigers.)/ Defunct.
    1932 NFL: 1 franchise est. 1932 on the map…
    •Boston football Braves (1932-36; 1934: changed name to Boston Redskins. )/ 1937: franchise moved to Washington, DC as the Washington Redskins (1937-2019; 2020-21:Washington Football Team)/Present-day Washington Commanders (1932- ).
    1933 NFL: 2 franchises est. 1933 on the map…
    •Philadelphia Eagles, of Philadelphia, PA (1933- {1948, 1949, 1960 NFL titles}./ Present-day Philadelphia Eagles (NFL, 1933- ).
    •Pittsburgh football Pirates, of Pittsburgh, PA (1933- ; 1940: changed name to Pittsburgh Steelers)./ Present-day Pittsburgh Steelers (NFL, 1933- ).
    1934 NFL: 1 relocated franchise on the map…
    •Detroit Lions, of Detroit, MI (orig. est. as the Portsmouth (OH) Spartans (1930-33)/ franchise moved to Detroit, MI in 1934 as the Detroit Lions (1934- {1935, 1952, 1953, 1957 NFL titles} .)/ Present-day Detroit Lions (NFL, 1934- ).
    1937 NFL: 1 new franchise & 1 relocated franchise est. 1937 on the map…
    •Cleveland Rams, of Cleveland, OH (1937-42; ’44-45) {1945 NFL title}/ 1946: franchise moved to Los Angeles, CA as the Los Angeles Rams (1946-94; 2016- ) {1951 NFL title}/ 1995: franchise moved to St. Louis, MO as the St. Louis Rams (1995-2015)/ 2016: franchise moved back to LA as the Los Angeles Rams)/ Present-day Los Angeles Rams (NFL, 1937- ).
    •Washington Redskins, of Washington, DC (orig. est. 1934-37 as the Boston Braves/Redskins/ 1937: franchise moved to Washington, DC (1937-2019; 2020: changed name to Washington Football Team; 2022: changed name to Washington Commanders {1937, 1942 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day Washington Commanders (NFL, 1934- ).
    1944 NFL: 1 franchises est. 1944 on the map…
    •Boston Yanks, of Boston, MA (1944; ’46-48)/ 1949: franchise moved to New York City, NY as the New York Bulldogs (1949; 1950: changed name to New York Yanks (1951-51)/ 1952: franchise moved to Dallas Texas as the Dallas Texans (1952/ Defunct).
    1946 NFL: 1 franchises est. 1946 on the map…
    •Los Angeles Rams, of Los Angeles, CA (orig. est. 1937 as the Cleveland Rams (1937-42; ’44-45) {1945 NFL title}/ 1946: franchise moved to Los Angeles, CA as the Los Angeles Rams (1946-94; 2016- ) {1951 NFL title}/ 1995: franchise moved to St. Louis, MO as the St. Louis Rams (1995-2015)/ 2016: franchise moved back to LA as the Los Angeles Rams)/ Present-day Los Angeles Rams (NFL, 1937- ).
    1950 NFL: 2 franchises est. 1950 on the map [AAFC/NFL merger of 1950]…
    •[AAFC-merger team] Cleveland Browns (1950-1995; 1999- {1950, 1954, 1955, 1964 NFL titles}.)/ Present-day Cleveland Browns (NFL, 1950-1995; 1999- ).
    -[AAFC-merger team] Baltimore Colts (I) (1950./ Defunct.) [Not shown on the map.]
    •[AAFC-merger team] San Francisco 49ers (1950- )/ Present-day San Francisco 49ers (NFL, 1950- ).
    1953 NFL: 1 franchises est. 1953 on the map…
    •Baltimore Colts (II) (1953–1983 {1958, 1959 NFL titles}./ 1984: franchise moved to Indianapolis, IN as the Indianapolis Colts (1984- ).)/ Present-day Indianapolis Colts (NFL, 1952- ).
    1960 NFL: 1 new franchise & 1 relocated franchise est. 1960 on the map…
    •Dallas Cowboys, of Greater Dallas-Fort Worth, TX (1960- .)/ Present-day Dallas Cowboys (NFL, 1960- ).
    •St. Louis football Cardinals (est. 1920 as the Chicago Cardinals (1920-59 {1925, 1947 NFL titles}/ 1960: franchise moved to St. Louis, MO as the St. Louis Cardinals (1960-87)/ 1988: franchise moved to Greater Phoenix, AZ (1988- ), as the Phoenix Cardinals; 1994: changed name to Arizona Cardinals.) / Present-day Arizona Cardinals (NFL, 1920- ).



    ___

May 11, 2022

Canada men’s national soccer team – line-up from the match which clinched their qualification for the 2022 FIFA World Cup – Canada 4-0 Jamaica on 27 March 2021 [Canada qualifies for FIFA World Cup for the first time in 36 years].

Filed under: Canada,Canada nat'l soccer team — admin @ 7:44 pm

By Bill Turianski on the 11th of May 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Canada men’s national soccer team (en.wikipedia.org).
-Canada Qualifies for First Men’s World Cup Since 1986 (by Andrew Gastelum on March 27 2022 at si.com/soccer).
-Canada changes football narrative with Qatar 2022 qualification (by Tristan D’Amours on March 30 2022 at aljazeera.com).
-The tactical factors behind Canada’s rise to the CONCACAF elite in the Octagonal (by Joseph Lowery on Jan 27 2022 at theathletic.com).




The Canada men’s soccer team has qualified for the World Cup, for the first time in 36 years. It is only Canada’s second qualification for a World Cup. (Their first came in the 1986 World Cup, in Mexico, when Canada went scoreless in their 3 first round games, and left the tournament dead last.) Canada will play in 2022 FIFA World Cup Group F (vs: Belgium, Morocco, and Croatia).

You can see how far the Canada men’s soccer team has come in the last 20 years by simply looking at their home venues. Twenty years ago, for 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification, Canada were playing in places like the 2,000-capacity Winnipeg Soccer Complex, and the 5,000-capacity Varsity Stadium in Toronto. Now, the Canada’s men’s soccer team plays their home matches at places like the 30,000-capacity BMO Field in Toronto (home of Major League Soccer’s FC Toronto), and the 23,000-capacity Tim Horton’s Field in Hamilton (home of the two-time Canadian Premier League champions Forge FC). And although Canada’s men’s team did play at Edmonton’s 56,000-capacity Commonwealth Stadium in both the 2002 and the 2022 FIFA WC qualifiers, this time around they were drawing over 44,000 there – twice. At Edmonton in mid-November 2021, in the cold and snow, 48,000 saw Canada beat Costa Rica 1-0; four days later, 44,000 were there to see Canada beat Mexico 2-1.

In the 2002 WC qualifiers, Canada were losing badly to teams like Trinidad (0-4 and 0-6 losses). In the 2022 WC qualifiers, Canada were beating teams like Mexico and USA and Costa Rica. In 2018, the Canada men’s soccer team was ranked #78 in the world. In March 2022, the Canada men’s soccer team was ranked #38 (out of 210 countries).

The Canada men’s soccer team’s recent success can be attributed to two things. First of all, there is a good crop of young players, many of whom are somewhat recent immigrants – immigrants to Canada (like GK Milan Borjan, DF Sam Adekugbe, LB Alphonso Davies and FW Jonathan David), and emigrants from Canada (see DF Scott Kennedy, MF Stephen Eustáquio and FW Lucas Cavallini, in their thumbnail bios in the squad chart further below). Canada has a diverse squad that reflects the country itself. An open and welcoming country.

And secondly, there is their galvanizing coach, John Herdman. In January 2018, the County Durham, England-born Herdman came to the Canada men’s team, after successful stints as the New Zealand women’s team coach (where he led the U-20 squad to the World Championship in 2006, then led the senior squad to the FIFA Women’s World Cups in 2007 and 2011), and then the Canada women’s team coach (where he led the Canada women’s team to bronze medals in both the London 2012 and the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympics). Like with the Canada women’s team, Herdman has instilled a belief in the men’s squad.

There is a hotbed of soccer in the Greater Toronto western suburb of Brampton that has produced no less than 5 players who currently play vital roles for Canada: Doneil Henry, Tajon Buchanan, Junior Hoilet, Cyle Larin, and their Captain, Atiba Hutchinson (the all-time Canada national team appearance leader, with 95 caps).




As far as pro careers go, quite a few Canada players play for prominent European clubs these days…LB/LW Alphonso Davies plays for the German giants Bayern Munich. MF Stephen Eustáquio plays for 2-time Champions League winners FC Porto. Both Winger Cyle Larin and DF Atiba Hutchinson play for Istanbul’s Beşiktaş. FW Jonathan David, who has an excellent international scoring rate of 30 caps/20 goals, plays for 2021 French champions Lille. RW/RMF Tajon Buchanan plays for Club Brugges, who were Belgian champions this year [2022]. Winger Junior Hoilet plays for Reading FC.

Young white Canadian kids still by and large dream of playing hockey (in the NHL), not soccer. But Canadian soccer is definitely on the rise. You can see it in the small but incremental progress the Canadian Premier League is making. And you can certainly see it in the remarkable progress the Canadian national teams – both the men’s and the women’s teams – have made.canada_national-soccer-team_fifa-2022-world-cup-qualifiers_squad-that-qualified-27-march-2022_canada-4_0-jamaica_john-herdman_e_.gif
canada_national-soccer-team_fifa-2022-world-cup-qualifiers_squad-that-qualified-27-march-2022_canada-4_0-jamaica_starting-11_plus-subs_c_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -2022 Canada jersey, photo from lovesoccerjerseys.com. -Blank map of Canada, by STyx; Semhur; Riba atFile:Blank map of Canada.svg (commons.wikimedia.org). -Canada squad & staff celebrate, photo by Steve Russell/Toronto Star at thestar.com/sports. -John Herdman, photo by Andy Jacobsohn/AFP/Getty Images via theguardian.com/football. -Canada squad celebrates after scoring v Jamaica, photo by Reuters/USA Today Sports via aljazeera.com/news.
Players…-Milan Borjan, photo by PA Images via alamy.com. -Richie Laryea, photo by Getty Images via nottinghampost.com/sport. -Doneil Henry, photo by Raul Romero Jr at california.funeral.com. -Scott Kennedy, photo by Reuters via taipeitimes.com. -Sam Adekugbe, photo by Seskim Photo/MB Media/Getty Images at gettyimages.co.uk. -Junior Hoilet, photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images at gettyimages.ae. -Stephen Eustáquio, photo by Jose Manuel Alvarez/Quality Sport Images/ Getty Images at gettyimages.dk. -Tajon Buchanan, photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@foxsoccer]. -Jonathan Osorio, photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images via cbc.ca/sports. -Cyle Larin, photo unattributed at sporx.com. -Jonathan David, photo by Jean Catuffe/DPPI/LiveMedia/Sipa USA via si.com/soccer. -Alistair Johnston, photo by Ryan Remiorz/CP via sportsnet.ca/soccer. -Atiba Hutchinson, photo by Seskim Photo/MB Media/Getty Images at gettyimages.com. -Kamal Miller, photo by David Kirouac/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images via gettyimages.ca. -Liam Fraser, photo by BELGA viahln.be. -Lucas Cavallini, photo by Imago Images via transfermarkt.co.in. -Alphonso Davies, photo by Roland Krivec/DeFodi Images via Getty Images via bavarianfootballworks.com.



___
Thanks to all at the following limks…
-Canada men’s national soccer team (en.wikipedia.org).
-kickalgor.com (March 2022 CONCACAF ranking, leagues-by-country).
-Transfermkt.us (for player-positions).
-Soccerway.com/[Canada nat'l team].

April 21, 2022

1969 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’69 World Series champions: the New York Mets; & AL and NL Stats Leaders.

Filed under: Baseball,Baseball-1969 MLB season,Retro maps — admin @ 12:56 pm

mlb_1969_map-of-mlb-1969_24-teams_ws-champions-new-york-mets_1969-mlb-attendances_1969-mlb-stats-leaders_post_f_.gif"
1969 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’69 World Series champions the New York Mets & AL and NL Stats Leaders




By Bill Turianski on the 21st of April 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1969 MLB season (en.wikipedia.org).
-1969 MLB (baseball-reference.com).
-Year in Review: 1969 American League (baseball-almanac.com).
-Year in Review: 1969 National League (baseball-almanac.com).
-1969 MLB logos (sportslogos.net).

1969 MLB Location-map with jersey-logos with 1969 attendances, featuring the ’69 World Series champion New York Mets.
This is my third in a series.
Here are links to the first two posts in this series:
1967 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’67 World Series champions: the St. Louis Cardinals;
1968 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’68 World Series champions: the Detroit Tigers.

The map shows the locations of the 24 Major League Baseball teams of 1969.
At the foot of the map-page are 1969 MLB Statistical Leaders (in both the American League and the National League), in the following categories: ERA, Wins, WAR for Pitchers; Batting Average, Home Runs, RBIs, WAR for Position Players. A photo of each player is shown, with stats; photo credits are at the foot of this post.

At the top of the map-page is a section for the 1969 MLB champions, the New York Mets. I featured photos of the 12 players on the ’69 Mets with the highest WAR [Wins Above Replacement], plus the their manager, Gil Hodges. Photo credits are at the foot of this post. The players are: Tom Seaver (RHP & 1969 Cy Young Award winner), Cleon Jones (LF), Tommie Agee (CF), Jerry Koosman (LHP), Jerry Grote (C), Tug McGraw (LHP/reliever), Gary Gentry (RHP), Bud Harrelson (SS), Art Shamsky (OF/1B/PH), Ron Taylor (RHP/reliever), Don Cardwell (RHP), Ken Boswell (2B).

On the map, next to each MLB team’s location-dot there are 3 things: their cap-logo, one of their jersey-logos (either home or away jersey), and a rectangular box (listing: ballpark, win total in 1969, and home average attendance in ’69). The jersey-logos are either from a photo of the old jerseys (see 22 photo credits at the foot of this post) or illustrations of such: one (California Angels) from sportslogos.net; one (Detroit Tigers) that I drew myself. The jersey-logo for each team is sized to reflect that team’s 1969 average attendance: the larger the jersey-logo, the higher the attendance that year. Any other team logos on the team’s uniforms in 1969 are also shown (specifically, shoulder-patch-logos, of which there were 6 of such in 1969: for the Astros, the Braves, the Cubs, the Mets, the Padres, and the Twins).

Speaking of shoulder-patch logos, there was another thing going on in Major League Baseball in 1969: the 100th anniversary of the first professional touring baseball club: the Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1869. A special red-white-&-blue modernist logo was created – reputedly using the formidable silhouette of Minnesota Twins’ slugger Harmon Killebrew. {See this: MLB logo looks like Harmon Killebrew at bat (from 2011, by Pioneer Press/news@pioneerpress.com via twincities.com). Also see this: Who is that silhouetted man? (from 2008, by Paul Lucas at espn.com).} So anyway, this logo, in the form of the Centennial patch, was worn by almost all the MLB teams in 1969 (on at least one of their jerseys that year), except for the Pittsburgh Pirates (I have no idea why, and neither does this baseball card blogger, at wrigleywax.blogspot.com. {To get a quick glance at all those uniforms, here are links to the Baseball Hall of Fame website’s ‘Dressed to the Nines’ database’s 1969 pages: 1969 AL; 1969 NL (illustrations by Marc Okkonen).} If you are wondering about the Cubs, in the illustration in the preceding link, the logo is not visible, as it is located on the raised shoulder that is holding the bat. But I included an image of the logo on the Cubs’ road jersey on the map here. I included several of the MLB-100th-anniversary-logos on the map, on the jerseys of the A’s, Astros, Cubs, Dodgers, Giants, Indians, and Mets. This MLB-100th-anniversary logo, in a very slightly altered form, has become the official MLB logo to this day. And each MLB team wears a version of this logo on the back of their ball caps, done in team colors.



    1969 MLB expansion & Divisional re-organization…

mlb_1969-expansion_re-org_d_.gif
Major League Baseball’s 1969 season was the first season of the Divisional Era.
1969 also saw a 4-team expansion – MLB’s third expansion of the decade. The Kansas City Royals and the Seattle Pilots joined the American League; the Montreal Expos and the San Diego Padres joined the National League. [Note: the Seattle Pilots relocated to Milwaukee, WI as the Milwaukee Brewers just one year later (in 1970); the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, DC as the Washington Nationals 36 years later (in 2005).] So in 1969, the now-12-team AL, and the now-12-team NL were divided into two 6-team divisions each, with those divisional winners playing in a best-of-5-series, the winners, of course, advancing to the World Series.

Brief re-cap of the 1969 regular season
The American League saw no real divisional title-races in 1969. The Baltimore Orioles, with an MLB-best record of 109-53, won the AL East easily, by 19 games, and then, in the new playoffs, swept the AL West champion Minnesota Twins in 3 games. In the National League East, the once-hapless New York Mets, who had never had a winning record in their 7 seasons, came back from 9 games behind the Chicago Cubs, going 37-11 down the stretch. In their relatively new, 5-year-old venue, Shea Stadium (which they shared with the NFL’s New York Jets), the Mets drew the biggest crowds in all of baseball that year, drawing 26.5 K per game. The Mets went 100-62, and beat out the faltering Cubs by 8 games to win the NL East title. The NL West saw an unusual 5-team divisional race, with the Astros dropping out first, then the Dodgers and the Reds fell off, while the Giants and the Braves battled it out until the second-to-last day. The Atlanta Braves won the NL West, but then were swept by the Mets in the playoffs. But going into the Fall Classic, the Baltimore Orioles were the oddsmakers’ choice, and were heavy favorites to win the World Series over the New York Mets…



    1969 World Series: New York Mets beat Baltimore Orioles in 5 games…

The “Amazin’ Mets” beat the heavily-favored Orioles, in a huge upset. The 8th-year Mets became the first expansion-team to win the World Series. There were spectacular catches by two Mets outfielders (Tommie Agee & Ron Swoboda – see below). The Mets’ Donn Clendenon hit 3 HRs, and was the MVP. Tom Seaver, Gary Gentry, and Jerry Koosman all pitched effectively for the Mets, with Koosman winning twice, including the Game 5 clincher (see below).
-Here is a 9-minute video of the 1969 WS, 1969 World Series – Baltimore Orioles versus New York Mets (video uploaded by Scott Gordon at youtube.com).
-Here is a 40-minute video on the ’69 Mets (with much sharper video images), 1969 World Series Film New York Mets (video uploaded by Sports Revisited at youtube.com).
new-york-mets-1969_ws-champions_h_.gif
Photos and Images above – 1969 NY Mets/Shea Stadium WS pin-logo from sportslogos.net. Aerial shot of Shea Stadium (circa late 1960s, and probably taken during the 1969 WS), photo unattributed at flickr.com. Tommie Agee’s two catches (game 3)…1st catch: photo unattributed at centerfieldmaz.com; 2nd catch: unattributed at thisdayinbaseball.com. Ron Swoboda catch (game 4), unattributed at slicethelife.com. Donn Clendenon in ’69 WS, photo by Herb Scharfman/Getty Images at gettyimages.com. Jerry Koosman pitching in ’69 WS, photo unattributed at mets.tumblr.com. Nolan Ryan & Jerry Grote celebrate on the mound, photo unattributed at centerfieldmaz.com. View from 3rd-base-side box seats as Mets (and their fans) begin their celebration, photo by AP via nydailynews.com.




Photos of Mets players on map page…
-Tom Seaver, photo unattributed at theathletic.com.
-Cleon Jones, photo by AP via newsday.com.
-Tommie Agee, photo unattributed at sabr.org.
-Jerry Koosman, Topps 1969 card via amazon.com.
-Tug McGraw, photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images via risingapple.com.
-Jerry Grote, photo unattributed at metsinsider.mlblogs.com.
-Bud Harrelson, photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images at gettyimages.in.
-Gary Gentry, photo unattributed at posterazzi.com.
-Art Shamsky, photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@artshamsky].
-Ron Taylor, photo unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Don Cardwell, photo by Eric Sckweikardt/Sports Illustrated via gettyimages.in.
-Ken Boswell, Topps 1969 card via picclick.com.
-Gil Hodges (manager), photo unattributed at metsmerizedonline.com.
-1969 NY Mets uniforms, illustration by Marc Okkonen at exhibits.baseballhalloffame.org/dressed_to_the_nines.


Photos of 1969 MLB leaders on map page…
-Dick Bosman, 1970 Topps card via tcdb.com.
-Juan Marichal, photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@sfgiants].
-Denny McLain, photo unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Tom Seaver, photo by Neil Leifer at si.com.
-Denny McLain, photo unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Bob Gibson, photo unattributed at lehmansbaseball.wordpress.com.
-Rod Carew, photo by Neil Leifer at si.com.
-Pete Rose, photo unattributed at cardboardmemories.com.
-Harmon Killebrew, photo unattributed at twinstrivia.com.
-Willie McCovey, photo unattributed at first-draft.com.
-Harmon Killebrew, photo by Neil Leifer at si.com.
-Willie McCovey, photo unattributed at cooperstownexpert.com.
-Rico Petrocelli, Topps 1969 card at ebay.com.
-Henry Aaron, Sports Illustrated cover [Aug. 13 1969] at sicovers.com.
-Willie McCovey, photo by Diamond Images/Getty Images via gettyimages.de.

Photos of jersey-logos used on the map-page…
-Tom Seaver 1969 NY Mets road jersey, from worthpoint.com. -Tom Seaver 1969 NY Mets home jersey, from greyflannelauctions.com.
-Atlanta Braves 1969 home jersey, from customthrowbackjerseys.com.
-Baltimore Orioles 1969 road jersey, from Heritage Auctions at sports.ha.com
-Boston Red Sox home jersey-logo, photo from sports.ha.com.
-Chicago Cubs 1969 road jersey, from mitchellandness.com.
-Chicago White Sox 1969 road jersey, from Heritage Auctions at sports.ha.com.
-Cincinnati Reds 1969 road jersey, from mitchellandness.com.
-Cleveland Indians 1969 road jersey, from lelands.com via nallhal.top.
-Houston Astros 1969 road jersey, from mitchellandness.com.
-Kansas City Royals 1969 road jersey, from worthpoint.com.
-Los Angeles Dodgers 1969 road jersey, from Heritage Auctions at sports.ha.com.
-Minnesota Twins home jersey circa 1968-71, from lelands.com.
-Montreal Expos 1969 road jersey, from customthrowbackjerseys.com.
-New York Mets 1969 home jersey, from mitchellandness.com.
-New York Yankees road jersey circa 1967-71, from customthrowbackjerseys.com.
-Oakland A’s 1969 road alternate jersey, from customthrowbackjerseys.com. -Philadelphia Phillies 1969 home jersey, from worthpoint.com.
-Pittsburgh Pirates ca. 1967-69 road jersey, photo from lelands.com.
-1968 St. Louis Cardinals jersey-logo, photo from scpauctions.com.
-San Diego Padres 1969 home jersey, from Heritage Auctions at sports.ha.com.
-1969 San Francisco Giants road jersey, photo from Heritage Auctions at sports.ha.com.
-Seattle Pilots 1969 road jersey, from scpauctions.com.
-Washington Senators 1969 road jersey, from mlbcollectors.com.
___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Base map, by US federal government employee at commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:StatesU.svg.
-Baseball-Reference.com.
-1969 Major League Baseball season (en.wikipedia.org).

April 3, 2022

2022 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 32-team Group Stage./+ Brief profiles of the 4 clubs making their Copa Libertadores Group Stage debuts in 2022…América Mineiro (Brazil), Fortaleza (Brazil), Independiente Petrolero (Bolivia), Red Bull Bragantino (Brazil).

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 3:56 pm

conmebol_copa-libertadores_2022_location-map_group-stage-32-teams_post_h_.gif
2022 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 32-team Group Stage, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed)



By Bill Turianski on the 3rd of April 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2022 Copa Libertadores/Group Stage (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores (worldfootball.net).
-Summary – CONMEBOL Libertadores [2022 Group Stage] (soccerway.com).

The Group Stage (of 32) begins on 5-7 April (1st game-week).
The group stage, consisting of 6 match-weeks, will last 8 weeks. Two-weeks gaps: after the 2nd game-week, and after the 4th game-week. The 6th and final game-week is 24-26 May. The Round of 16 is in late June & early July. The Final is in October, in Guayaquil, Ecuador: on 29 October 2022 at Estadio Monumental Isidro Romero Carbo, which is owned and operated by Barcelona SC.

The map…
Teams are shown in the two flanking sections on either side of the map, organized by country. Shown there in the country-groupings are each team’s all-time total Libertadores appearances (in the tan-colored column), and Libertadores titles (in the pale-blue-colored column). At the far left of the map-page is the Libertadores titles list by club (25 clubs have won a Libertadores title). At the far right is the Libertadores titles list by country (of the 62 Libertadores titles, 25 have been won by Argentine teams, and 21 have been won by Brazilian teams).

Teams which had to play in the 3 Preliminary Stages [19 teams] are shown in italics (lowest-ranked qualifiers). From these 19 teams, only 4 qualified for the Group Stage of 32:
América Mineiro (BRA), Estudiantes (ARG), Olimpia (PAR), The Strongest (BOL). Those four teams remain on the map here, while the other 15 preliminary-round teams who were eliminated are no longer on the map here.

So that makes the breakdown for the 2022 Libertadores Group Stage the following…
Brazil, 8 teams (6 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries] + the Cup Holder: Palmeiras + the Copa Sudamericana winner: Athletico Paranaense).
Argentina, 6 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries].
Paraguay, 3 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries].
Bolivia, 3 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries].
Uruguay, 2 teams.
Colombia, 2 teams.
Chile, 2 teams.
Ecuador, 2 teams.
Peru, 2 teams.
Venezuela, 2 teams.



    Below: The 4 clubs making their Copa Libertadores Group Stage debuts in 2022

america-miniero_jersey-badge_b_.gif
• América Mineiro (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais state, Brazil)
América Mineiro are the third-largest club in Belo Horizonte, behind two-time Libertadores winners Cruzeiro, and one-time Libertadores winners Atlético Mineiro. Belo Horizonte is the 7th-largest city in South America, with a metro-area population of around 5.8 million. Belo Horizonte is situated inland, and is located, by road, 438 km (272 mi) N of Rio de Janeiro. América Futebol Clube (MG), est. 1912, have played 18 seasons in the Brazilian top-flight, starting in 1971. América Mineiro wear green-and-black vertically-striped jerseys. In the last decade-and-half América Mineiro have moved out of the third tier and have become a Série A/Série B yo-yo club. In 2009, América Mineiro were promoted to Série B. In the following year of 2010, América Mineiro were promoted again, to Série A. That same year of 2010 saw the club renovating their ground. But in 2011, América Mineiro were relegated back to the 2nd tier. Three years later, in 2015, they were promoted back to Série A, only to go back down to Série B again in 2016. Then América Mineiro did it again: up to the top flight in 2017; down once again to the 2nd division in 2018. In 2019, though, they remained in Série B. In 2020, they were promoted once again to Série A. And in 2021, América Mineiro finished in 8th place in the Brasileiro, which was good enough for Brazil’s final Libertadores preliminary-round spot. In the 2022 Libertadores preliminaries’ 2nd round in February, América Mineiro beat Guaraní (of Paraguay), on penalties. Then in the preliminaries’ 3rd round in March, América Mineiro beat Barcelona SC (of Ecuador), on penalties. So in the 2022 Libertadores Group Stage, América Mineiro make their Libertadores group stage debut, playing in a group that includes local rivals Atlético Mineiro. América Mineiro play at the 23-K-capacity Estádio Independência, which is a rather decent four-stand arena that was opened in 1950, and extensively renovated in 2010-12. América Mineiro’s pre-COVID attendance figures were: 6,479 per league match in Série A in 2018, and 3,907 per league match in Série B in 2019.

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• Fortaleza (Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil)
Fortaleza are from Fortaleza, capital of the state of Ceará, up in the northeast of Brazil. Fortaleza is the 11th-largest city in South America, with a metro-area population of around 3.9 million. Fortaleza Esporte Clube, est. 1918, have played 24 seasons in the Brazilian top-flight, starting in 1959, but had never played in the Copa Libertadores. Fortaleza had earned a Libertadores spot though, back in 1968, when they finished as runners-up in Brazil. But the Brazilian fútbol authorities decided to void their 1969 Copa Libertadores spots (2 spots), because that would (supposedly) come in conflict with the Brazilian national team’s preparations for the 1970 World Cup Qualifiers. Five years ago, in 2017, stuck in the third division, Fortaleza won promotion from Série C. Four years ago, in 2018, Fortaleza won their second-straight promotion, finishing in 1st in Série B and drawing a 2nd-tier-best 29,400 per league match. Then three years ago, in 2019, Fortaleza were finally back in Série A, and were one of the highest-drawing Brazilian clubs, drawing 33,800 per league match. They finished in a decent 9th place in 2019. But in their second season back in the top tier, in 2020, Fortaleza almost got relegated, finishing in 16th and only avoiding the drop on goal-difference. However, last year, in 2021, Fortaleza had an amazing turnaround and finished in 4th place in the 2021 Brasileiro. That was good enough for Fortaleza to win their first-ever Copa Libertadores spot: an automatic qualification for the 2022 Libertadores group stage. Fortaleza wear blue-and-red-horizontally-striped jerseys. They play at the 63-K-capacity Castelão, which they share with local rivals Ceará Sporting Club (who are also currently a top-flight club).

independiente-petrolero_jersey-badge_b_.gif
• Independiente Petrolero (Sucre, Bolivia)
With a population of around 390,000, Sucre is the 6th-largest city in Bolivia, sitting 1.7 miles up in the thin air, 2,810 meters (9,220 ft) above sea level. Sucre is located, by road, 689 km (428 mi) SE of La Paz. Sucre is the constitutional capital of Bolivia, and the capital of the Chuquisaca Department. The club was established in 1932, as Independiente Sporting Club. In 1953, the club began to be administered by Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales Bolivianos (YPFB), and changed its name to Club Independiente Petrolero. The club have played 22 seasons in the Bolivian Primera División, starting in 1972. They won their first Bolivian title in 2021, one year after winning promotion back to the top tier. Independiente Petrolero wear red-and-white-vertically-striped jerseys. They share a 32-K-capacity ground, Estadio Olímpico Patria, with local rivals Universitario de Sucre.
Image credit above – Independiente Petrolero jersey badge via footballkitarchive.com.

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• Red Bull Bragantino (Bragança Paulista, São Paulo state, Brazil)
Red Bull Bragantino are owned by Austrian energy drink conglomerate Red Bull GmbH, and feature Red Bull’s logo, and, like the Bundesliga’s Red Bull Leipzig, and the Austrian Bundesliga’s Red Bull Salzburg, and Major League Soccer’s New York Red Bulls, they wear white jerseys with red pants. They are located in the city of Bragança Paulista (population of 170,000), which is on the northern outer edge of the sprawling São Paulo metro-area, 67 km (42 mi) N of the São Paulo city-centre. Before April 2019, the club was called Clube Atlético Bragantino, and wore black-and-white. The club has played 12 seasons in the Brazilian top-flight, starting in 1990. Like Fortaleza, Red Bull Bragantino have recently won back-to-back promotions – they were promoted up to Série B in 2018, and then were promoted up to Série A in 2019. Red Bull Bragantino finished in 10th place in the Brasileiro in 2020. Then last year in 2021, they finished in 6th, which is Brazil’s last Libertadores group stage spot. Red Bull Bragantino play at the 17-K-capacity Estádio Nabi Abi Chedid. As one can see by that capacity figure, Red Bull Bragantino are not that large a club: pre-COVID [2019], Bragantino were drawing 6,200 per league match in Série B. But the club is able to compete at the top-flight level thanks to Red Bull’s financial clout.



___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2019 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

March 23, 2022

2022 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list (1948-2019, 2021)./+Some notes on the current make-up Division I men’s ice hockey.

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey — admin @ 11:41 am

ncaa_mens-ice-hockey_tournament_2022_16-teams_location-map_w-all-time-D1-titles-and-frozen-four-list_post_e_.gif
2022 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list (1948-2019, 2021)



By Bill Turianski on the 23rd of March 2022; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2022 NCAA Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Tournament (en.wikipedia.org).
-Division I in ice hockey (en.wikipedia.org).
-uscho.com.
-Schedule, scores, etc…collegehockeynews.com/schedules.

Tournament starts 12 noon ET on Thursday, March 24 (Minnesota State vs. Harvard). Four games Thursday & four games Friday (Semifinals); Regional Finals on Saturday & Sunday. Frozen Four on April 7 and 9. ESPN will cover the whole tournament. {2022 Frozen Four: NCAA men’s hockey tournament schedule/ Teams at a Glance.}

2022 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list (1948-2019, 2021)…
The map is a basic location-map, with conference-affiliations noted for each team. Reigning champions are Massachusetts (UMass), of Hockey East. The Minutemen won their first D-1 men’s hockey title last year, beating St. Cloud State 5-0 {see this, from the Berkshire Eagle}. UMass returns to the tournament this year, though they stumbled in the Hockey East tournament final, losing to Harvard.

The four #1 seeds:
Michigan Wolverines (1),
Minnesota State Mavericks (2),
Western Michigan Broncos (3),
Denver Pioneers (4).
{Bracket.}

Teams qualified – by conference – are listed at the top-right of the map-page. The breakdown by conference:
-5 teams from the NCHC (including two #1 seeds: Western Michigan, Denver).
-3 teams from the Big Ten (including one #1 seed: Michigan).
-3 teams from Hockey East. (including last year’s champions, UMass)
-2 teams from the CCHA (including one #1 seed: Minnesota State).
-2 teams from ECAC Hockey.
-1 team from Atlantic Hockey.

At the lower-right-hand side is the all-time list of D-1 men’s hockey titles & Frozen Four appearances. (From the tournament’s start in 1948, to 2019, and 2021 [following the cancellation of the 2020 edition due to the COVID pandemic].)
{Titles list, by team.}

A long, narrow side-bar at the right-hand-side of the map shows the 16 teams’ locations and their total Tournament appearances. To see a full, sortable list of all NCAA D-1 men’s hockey Tournament appearances, {click here}.

At the top of the map is a section showing alternate logos for the 16 teams, arranged alphabetically.



Some notes on the current make-up Division I men’s ice hockey…
For men’s ice hockey, the WCHA has been scrapped, and in its place is the CCHA (Central Collegiate Hockey Association). (The WCHA is now just for women’s ice hockey.) This happened after the 2020-21 season, when 7 of the 10 then-current men’s members of the WCHA left to form a revived CCHA. The word “central” in the CCHA name is crucial here. Because the 3 teams that made the men’s WCHA such a sprawling and unwieldy conference have been dropped…Alaska-Anchorage, Alaska-Fairbanks, and Alabama-Huntsville. The resultant savings in travel costs are quite considerable for the teams in the re-vamped CCHA. CCHA teams are located in the states of Michigan (4 teams, 3 of which are from the Upper Peninsula), Minnesota (3 teams), and Ohio (1 team). {List of teams & map, here}.

But that left those three excluded programs – two in Alaska and one in Alabama – out of any conference, and fundamentally weakened. Alabama-Huntsville have suspended operations, but hope to be revived in the future. Alaska-Anchorage have also suspended operations, but are expected to return for the 2022–23 season, as an Independent. Alaska-Fairbanks have not suspended operations, though, and played 2021-22 as an Independent. At this point in time, there are now 3 Independent teams in D-1 men’s hockey: Alaska-Fairbanks, Arizona State, and a new team, LIU (see 2 paragraphs below).

Meanwhile, another D-1 men’s hockey program has suspended operations: Robert Morris, of Greater Pittsburgh, PA. In December 2021 it was announced that Robert Morris would return to D-1 men’s hockey two years later in 2023-24 {see this}.

-And finally, in the last two seasons, two programs have made their D-1 men’s hockey debuts…
•In 2020-21, the LIU Sharks joined D-1 men’s hockey. (Long Island University of Brooklyn, NYC, NY & East Meadow, LI, NY.) Independent.
•In 2021-22, the St. Thomas Tommies joined D-1 men’s hockey. (University of St. Thomas of St. Paul, Minnesota.) Member of the CCHA.

At this point in time [end of 2021-22 season], D-1 men’s hockey has 59 teams, down from 61 teams previously.



___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-AMK1211, for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Fernando Martello, for the illustration of the Michigan road jersey logo, at File:Michigan wolverines hockey unif.png (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Eswany33, for illustration of Minnesota jersey logo, File:Gopher Hockey Uniforms 2020-21.svg.
-Vintage Minnesota Hockey site, for illustration of Minnesota State Mavericks home jersey (gold) script-logo, at history.vintagemnhockey.com.
-American International site for AIC logo, aicyellowjacketsstore.merchorders.com.
-UMass jersey from umassstore.com.
-Most logos from en.wikipedia and sportslogos.com/[American colleges].

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