billsportsmaps.com

June 14, 2021

France national team, 2020 UEFA Euro [June 2021]: Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (26 player-profiles).

Filed under: France — admin @ 7:38 am

By Bill Turianski on the 14th of June 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-France National Football team/Current squad (en.wikipedia.org).
-France Euro 2020 squad: Full 26-man squad revealed – and includes shock inclusion of Karim Benzema (fourfourtwo.com, from 18 May 20201).
-Tensions between Olivier Giroud and Kylian Mbappé at France on the eve of Euro 2020 (weaintgotnohistory.sbnation.com, from 11 June 2021).
-France vs Germany: Benzema and Griezmann get green light (en.as.com, from 13 June 2021).




    Below: France national team, 2020 UEFA Euro (June 2021) – Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (all 26 players)


[Note: you can click on the image below to view in a separate, scrollable screen.]
france_national-team_uefa-euro-2020-june2021_projected-lineup_with-15-substitutions_26-player-profiles_m_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
France 2021 jersey, from uksoccershop.com. France 2021 away jersey badge, from fanatics-intl.com. Blank map of France, from demis.nl at File:France with Corsica2 (demis).png (commons.wikimedia.org).





Photo credits for players & coach…
France players celebrating the winning goal by Antoine Griezmann versus Bosnia (FIFA WC qualifiers on 31 March 2021 in Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina). From left: Olivier Giroud, Antoine Griezmann, Raphaël Varane, Kylian Mbappé, Adrien Rabiot, Lucas Hernández – photo by Franck Fife/Getty Images via sportskeeda.com.
Coach…Didier Deschamps, photo by Frank Fife via lexpress.fr/actualite/sport. France jersey badge, photo from soccer.com/shop.
Goalkeeper… Hugo Lloris (Tottenham), photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images via hitc.com.
Defenders…
-Benjamin Pavard (RB/CB/LB) (Bayern Munich), photo by A. Hassenstein/Getty Images for FC Bayern via bavarianfootballworks.com.
-Raphaël Varane (CB) (Real Madrid), photo by Getty Images via uk.newschant.com.
-Presnel Kimpembe (CB/LB) (PSG), photo unattributed at archyde.com.
-Lucas Hernández (LB/CB) (Bayern Munich), photo by A. Hassenstein/Getty Images for FC Bayern via bavarianfootballworks.com.
Midfielders…
-Paul Pogba (CMF/AMF/DMF) (Manchester United), photo unattributed at sportskeeda.com.
-N’Golo Kanté (CMF/DMF) (Chelsea), photo by Getty Images via thes*n.co.uk/sport.
-Adrien Rabiot (CMF/DMF) (Juventus), photo by Icon Sport via dailymercato.com.
Forwards…
-Karim Benzema (CF/LW/RW) (Real Madrid), photo unattributed at m.imdb.com.
-Antoine Griezmann (CF/LW/RW) (Barcelona), photo by David Ramos/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com.
-Kylian Mbappé (CF/LW/RW(PSG), photo by Getty Images via independent.co.uk/sport.
Other player-options (Goalkeepers & Central Defenders)…
-Steve Mandanda (GK) (Marseille), photo by Icon Sport via butfootballclub.fr.
-Mike Maignan (GK) (Lille), photo unattributed at 90min.com.
-Jules Koundé (CB) (Sevilla), photo unattributed at football-espana.net.
-Clément Lenglet (CB) (Barcelona), photo by Alex Caparros/Getty Images via everythingbarca.com.
Other player-options (Defenders)…
-Léo Dubois (RB/RMF/LB) (Lyon), photo unattributed at madeingones.com
-Kurt Zouma (CB/RB) (Chelsea), photo unattributed at acehfootball.net.
-Moussa Sissoko (CMF/DMF/RMF) (Tottenham), photo by Rob Newell – CameraSport via Getty Images via tbrfootball.com.
-Lucas Digne (LB) (Everton), photo by Emma Simpson/Everton FC via Getty Images via tbrfootball.com.
Other player-options (Midfielders & Wingers)…
-Corentin Tolisso (CMF/DMF/AMF) (Bayern Munich), photo by fcbayern.com.
-Marcus Thuram (LW/CF/RW) (Borussia Mönchengladbach), photo by Christian Verheyen/Borussia Moenchengladbach via Getty Images via cartilagefreecaptain.sbnation.com.
-Thomas Lemar (AMF/ LW/RW) (Atlético Madrid), photo unattributed at futballnews.com.
Other player-options (Forwards & Wingers)…
-Ousmane Dembélé (RW/LW/CF) (Barcelona), photo by Jose Breton/Pics Action/NurPhoto via Getty Images via rousingthekop.com.
-Olivier Giroud (CF) (Chelsea), photo by Marc Atkins/Getty Images via theguardian.com/football.
-Wissam Ben Yedder (CF) (Monaco), photo from ligue1.com.
-Kingsley Coman (LW/RW/CF) (Bayern Munich), photo unattributed at strettynews.com.

-Thanks to transfermkt.com, for player-position info.


June 4, 2021

England national team, UEFA Euro 2020 (June 2021) – Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (all 26 players).

Filed under: England National Team — admin @ 8:49 am

By Bill Turianski on the 4th of June 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-England Euro-2020 squad (complete lineup), England names final squad for EURO 2020 (by Joe Prince-Wright on 1 June 2021, at soccer.nbcsports.com).
-England National Football team/Current squad (en.wikipedia.org).




When Gareth Southgate selects a replacement for the injured Trent Alexander-Arnold, I will update the chart accordingly. Here is an article on that: {England Euro 2020 squad profile: Trent Alexander ruled out (fourfourtwo.com).}

Update, 7 June…Ben White (CB/RB/DMF) (Brighton) has been selected to replace Trent Alexander-Arnold. {Ben White called into England’s Euro 2020 squad in place of Alexander-Arnold, by Jacob Steinberg on 7 June 2021, at theguardian.com/football).}

Here is a link for England’s Group, with fixtures UEFA Euro 2020 Group D (from en.wikipedia.org).
England’s matches: v Croatia (13 June); v Scotland (18 June); v Czech Republic (22 June).

I have also made a full-squad chart for Belgium {from May 2021, here}. And previously, I made a 15-man squad chart for Scotland, after they secured Euro qualification {from Dec 2020, here}. I will post a full-squad chart for France on the 14th of June (which is one day before France’s first match in the tournament, v Germany).

    Below: England national team, 2020 UEFA Euro (June 2021) – Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (all 26 players)

[Note: you can click on the image below to view in a separate, scrollable screen.]
england_national-team_uefa-euro-2020_projected-lineup_with-15-substitutions_26-player-profiles_u_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
England 2021 home jersey, from footdealer.com. Illustration of 2021 England kits, from en.wikipedia.org. Blank map of United Kingdom, by Daniel Dalet at d-maps.com. Blank map of England by Nilfanion at File:England relief location map.jpg. England 2021 away badge [3-lions-in-red-on-royal-blue-dark-blue], photo from mysoccerstore.com.




Photo credits for players & coach…
England players celebrate Harry Maguire’s winning goal versus Poland in World Cup Qualification game on 31 March at Wembley in London; from left: Kyle Walker, Mason Mount, Harry Maguire, Ben Chilwell, Declan Rice; photo by Getty Images via bbc.com/sport/football. Gareth Southgate, photo from thes*n.co.uk via totalfootballanalysis.com.
Goalkeeper… Jordan Pickford (GK) (Everton), photo by Reuters via inews.co.uk/sport.
Defenders…
-Kyle Walker (RB/RMF/CB) (Manchester City), photo by Reuters via sportsmole.co.uk/football.
-John Stones (CB/RB) (Manchester City), photo from premierleague.com/news.
-Harry Maguire (CB) (Manchester United), photo by Chloe Knott/Danehouse/Getty Images via forbes.com.
-Ben Chilwell (CB/RB/LB) (Chelsea), photo unattributed at caughtoffside.com.
Midfielders…
-Kalvin Phillips (DMF/CMF, RMF) (Leeds United), photo by Alex Pantling/Getty Images via leeds-live.co.uk/sport.
-Declan Rice (DMF/CB) (West Ham United), photo unattributed at football.london.
-Mason Mount (AMF/CMF/LMF) (Chelsea), photo by Getty Images via thes*n.ie/sport.
Forwards & Wingers…
-Raheem Sterling (LW/RW/CF) (Manchester City), photo unattributed at goal.com.
-Harry Kane (CF) (Tottenham), photo by Daniel Leal Olivas – Pool/Getty Images via football.london.
-Phil Foden (AMF/CMF/LMF) (Manchester City), photo unattributed at technotrenz.com.
Other player-options (Defensive)…
-Reece James (RB/RMF/CB) (Chelsea), unattributed at football.london.
-Conor Coady (CB/RB) (Wolverhampton), photo by AMA via shropshirestar.com/sport.
-Tyrone Mings (CB/LB) (Aston Villa), photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@OfficialTM_3].
-Luke Shaw (LB) (Manchester United), photo by Getty Images via acefootball.com.
Other player-options (Defensive & Midfield)…
-Kieran Trippier (RMF/RB) (Atlético Madrid), photo unattributed at lancs.live/sport.
-Ben White (CB/RB/DMF) (Brighton), photo unattributed at sportslens.com.
-Jordan Henderson (CMF/CB/DMF) (Liverpool), photo by Sean Botterill/Getty Images via lfcglobe.co.uk.
Other player-options (Attacking)…
-Jadon Sancho (RW/LW/AMF) (Borussia Dortmund), photo by AFP via malaymail.com.
-Dominic Calvert-Lewin (CF/LW) (Everton), photo unattributed at vbetnews.com.
-Marcus Rashford (LW/CF/RW) (Manchester United), photo by Getty Images via football.london.
-Jack Grealish (LW/AMF/RW) (Aston Villa), photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images via hitc.com.
Other player-options (backup Goalkeepers & youngest in squad)…
-Dean Henderson (GK) (Manchester United), photo unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Sam Johnstone (GK) (West Bromwich Albion), photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images via tbrfootball.com.
-Jude Bellingham (CMF/DMF) (Borussia Dortmund), photo by Getty Images via birminghammail.co.uk/sport.
-Bukayo Saka (RW/LW/LB) (Arsenal), photo by Adam Davy/PA via 247newsaroundtheworld.com/sports.



May 25, 2021

Belgium national team, UEFA Euro 2020 (June 2021) – Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (all 26 players).

Filed under: Belgium — admin @ 9:58 am

By Bill Turianski on the 25th of May 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Belgium Euro-2020 squad (complete lineup) (fourfourtwo.com [18 May 2021]).
-Belgium National Football team/Current squad (en.wikipedia.org).

-Euro 2020: Guardian Experts’ Network – Euro 2020 team guides part 5: Belgium (by Kristof Terreur at theguardian.com/football [1 June 2021]).




    Below: Belgium national team, 2020 UEFA Euro (June 2021) – Squad, with projected starting lineup and 15 substitutions (all 26 players)

[Note: you can click on the image below to view in a separate, scrollable screen.]
belgium_national-team_uefa-euro-2020_projected-lineup_with-15-substitutions_26-player-profiles_m_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Belgium 2021 kits, illustration from en.wikipedia.org. Belgium 2021 jersey, photo from adidas.com. Map of Belgium with linguistic composition, base map by ft.com; caption by billsportsmaps.com.




Photo credits for players & coach…
Belgium players during 2-0 defeat of England (15 Nov 2020 UEFA Nations League match at Den Dreef Stadion in Heverlee, Belgium), photo by Reuters via malaymail.com.
Coach… Roberto Martínez, photo by Virginia LeFour/Belgium AFP via Getty Images via cnn.com.
Goalkeeper…Thibaut Courtois (Real Madrid), photo by Real Madrid CF at realmadrid.com.
Defenders…
-Toby Alderweireld (CB/RB) (Tottenham), photo unattributed at lastwordonsports.com.
-Jason Denayer (CB/RB/DMF) (Lyon), photo by Eurasia Sport Images via gettyimages.no.
-Jan Vertonghen (CB/LB) (Benfica), photo by slbenfica.pt.
Midfielders…
-Thomas Meunier (RB/RMF) (Borussia Dortmund), photo unattributed at twitter.com/[@thommills].
-Youri Tielemans (CMF/AMF/DMF) (Leicester City), photo by Plumb Images/Leicester City via Getty Images via leicestermercury.co.uk/sport.
-Leander Dendoncker (DMF/CMF/CB) (Wolverhampton), photo unattributed at footballfancast.com.
-Thorgan Hazard (LW/RW/AMF) (Borussia Dortmund), photo by Alexandre Simoes/Borussia Dortmund via Getty Images via fearthewall.com.
Attacking Midfielders & Forwards…
-Kevin De Bruyne (AMF/CMF/RW) (Manchester City), photo unattributed at lastwordonsports.com.
-Romalu Lukaku (CF) (Internazionale), photo by Marco Canoniero/LightRocket via Getty Images via manchestereveningnews.co.uk/sport.
-Dries Mertens (CF/LW) (Napoli), photo by Getty Images via calciomercato.it.
Other player-options…
-Timothy Castagne (RB/RMF/LMF) ( (Leicester City), photo by Tim Keeton/Pool/AFI via Getty Images via leicestermercury.co.uk/sport.
-Dedryck Boyata (CB/LB) (Hertha BSC), photo by Soeren Stache via sportbuzzer.de.
-Thomas Vermaelen (CB/LB) (Vissel Kobe), photo by J-League via Getty Images via gettyimages.com.
-Nacer Chadli (LW/RW/AMF) (İstanbul Başakşehir), photo by Simon Stacpoole/Offside/Offside via Getty Images via gettyimages.com.
-Axel Witsel (CMF/DMF) (Borussia Dortmund), photo unattributed at voetbal24.be.
-Dennis Praet (CMF/AMF/LMF) (Leicester City), photo by Visionhaus via foxesofleicester.com.
-Yannick Carrasco (LMF/LW/RW) (Atlético Madrid), photo by Nur Photo via Getty Images via forbes.com.
-Eden Hazard (LW/AMF/RW) (Real Madrid), photo by Javier Soriano/AFP via france24.com.
-Christian Benteke (CF) (Crystal Palace), photo unattributed at sportslens.com.
-Michy Batshuayi (CF) (Chelsea, on loan to Crystal Palace), photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images via gettyimages.com.
-Leandro Trossard (LMF/AMF/FW) (Brighton & Hove Albion), photo by Premier League at premierleague.com.
Other player-options (backup ‘keepers & 3rd stringers)…
-Simon Mignolet (GK) (Club Brugge), photo by Sebastien Smets / Photo News via Getty Images via tbrfootball.com.
-Matz Sels (GK) (RC Strasbourg), photo unattributed at madeinfoot.ouest-france.fr/photos-foot.
-Jérémy Doku (RW/LW) (Rennes), photo by Photo News via hln.be.
-Hans Vanaken (AMF/CMF/LMF) (Club Brugge), photo by Photo News via hln.be.



May 16, 2021

Norway: 2021 Eliteserien – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-division (current clubs) & All-time Norwegian titles list./+Bodø/Glimt: the northern-most team on the planet to have won a top-flight national football title.

Filed under: Norway — admin @ 12:33 pm

norway_2021-eliteserien_map_w_oslofjord-map_seasons-in-1st-div_all-time-titles-list_post_e_.gif
Norway: 2021 Eliteserien – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-division (current clubs) & All-time Norwegian titles list




By Bill Turianski on the 16th of May 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Norway – Summary (table, fixtures, results, stats, etc) (soccerway.com).
-Eliteserien (en.wikipedia.org).

-Norwegian Eliteserien 2021 club-by-club preview, from reddit.com/soccer by ZxentixZ (from 9 May 2021, at us.reddit.com/r/soccer).

The map shows the 16 teams in the 2021 Eliteserien, the top-flight football league of Norway, which plays from May to November. On the map-page there is also an inset-map of the Greater Oslo/Oslofjord region, which shows the 8 Eliteserien teams from that area. There is also a bit of demographic info on Norway, found at the upper-left of the map page, and below that is a list showing all 7 metro-areas in Norway that have a population above 100,000.

On the map, for each the 16 Eliteserien clubs of 2021, there are shown the following:
Location, club crest, full club name and year of origin, stadium (and its capacity), 2019 average attendance [which was the most recent season before the COVID-19 pandemic affected attendance figures], and Norwegian titles.

At the upper-right of the map-page there is a brief history of Norwegian top-flight football [fotball].

And there are 2 charts. One chart shows Seasons-in-Top-flight for the current clubs (2021 is the 77th season of top-flight football in Norway). And another chart shows the All-time Norwegian titles list (1938-’39; 1947-2020).

A couple other notes…The inset-map of Greater Oslo/Oslofjord region shows the populated areas there in a pale-red colour. The main map shows all the cities in the Scandinavian and Baltic Sea regions which have metro-area populations above 400,000. Those 15 cities are…St Petersburg (Russia), Stockholm (Sweden), Copenhagen (Denmark), Minsk (Belarus), Oslo (Norway), Helsinki (Finland), Gothenburg (Sweden), Gdansk (Poland), Kiel (Germany), Riga (Latvia), Malmo (Sweden), Kaliningrad (Russia), Vilnius (Lithuania), Bergen (Norway), Tallinn (Estonia).

And the Arctic Circle is shown (see below for the reason for that).

Last season an unlikely champion was crowned in Norway: Bodø/Glimt
Bodø/Glimt are located just north of the Arctic Circle, in the small town of Bodø, Nordland, population, 52,000. (The town of Bodø is further north than Fairbanks, Alaska.) At the foot of this post, in the illustration for Bodø/Glimt, there is a synopsis of their history, which I will expand on a bit more below…

Before 1963, clubs from the north of Norway were not allowed to compete in the Norwegian Cup. That is, clubs from the two northern-most Norwegian counties of Nordland, and Troms og Finnmark, were barred by the Norwegian football authorities (the NFF, or Norges Fotballforbund. They also were barred from the Norwegian top flight.

It took until 1972 for the NFF to finally allow northern teams the right to compete for promotion to the top division. The first club from Northern Norway to gain promotion to the top flight was FK Mjølner, of Narvik, in 1972 (but they were relegated the following season). (I put Narvik on the map in case you were wondering where it is located.)

Why this long standing policy of exclusion? Well, by the 1970s, there were teams up north that were good enough – it was simply that the southern-biased NFF smugly felt otherwise. In 1975, Bodø/Glimt showed how good teams from the north were by becoming the first club from Northern Norway to win the Norwegian Football Cup.

But meanwhile, the NFF had stacked the deck against northern clubs trying to win promotion from the second tier. They did this right after the aforementioned FK Mjølner got promoted in 1972. So staring in 1973, the NFF put all the northern teams in a separate division – one of three divisions within the second tier – then made it much more difficult for the winner of that northern-subdivision. Because the other two subdivisions in the 2nd tier were comprised entirely of southern Norwegian teams, and the winners in both those subdivisions got instant promotion to the top flight. But the northern subdivision winner had to also win an extra playoff round (versus both the 2nd-place-finishers from the two southern subdivision) to gain promotion. This stilted system lasted until 1978.

This exclusionary state of affairs kept Bodø/Glimt out of the top flight for 3 years, until 1976, when they beat Odd BK 4-0 and drew 1-1 with FK Lyn. That made Bodø/Glimt the second club from Northern Norway to play in the top flight. (The only other club from Northern Norway to have gained promotion to the top flight is Tromsø IL.) In 1977, in Bodø/Glimt’s first season in the top tier, they finished in 2nd place, 8 points behind the champions, Lillestrøm.



Since then, Bodø/Glimt have won one more Norwegian Cup (in 1993), and have had a 13-year spell stuck back in the 2nd tier and 3rd tier (from 1980 to ’92), as well as a 13-year spell back in the top tier (from 1993 to 2005, including a 2nd-place-finish in 2003). Then, in the early 2000s they basically turned into a yo-yo club (3 relegations and 3 promotions since 2005). That all changed in 2019, when Bodø/Glimt turned into a competitor for the title once more, finishing in 2nd place. Then in 2020, Bodø/Glimt ran away with the title.

By winning the Eliteserien by 19-points last November, Bodø/Glimt became the northern-most team on the planet to have won a top-flight national football title. And so three years after their most recent promotion, Bodø/Glimt transformed themselves from a yo-yo club that inevitably sold off their best players in order to make ends meet, into the national champions.

In 2020, Bodø/Glimt scored an astounding 3.4 goals per game, and had a +71 goal difference. And Bodø/Glimt lost only twice all season – losing once to then-reigning champions Molde, and losing in the Europa League qualifiers to Italian giants AC Milan. Bodø/Glimt’s unusual title run has led many to call them the Leicester City of Scandinavia.

-Norway Has a Must-See Team. Barely Anyone Can Watch It. Bodo/Glimt is on the cusp of its first championship, a soccer success story built on style and innovation… (by Rory Smith on 8 Nov 2020 at nytimes.com/sport).

-Bodo/Glimt make history with Norwegian Eliteserien title win (from 22 Nov 2020, at bbc.com/football).

    Bodø/Glimt – 2020 Norwegian champions

bodo-glimt_bodo-glimt-2020-eliteserien_norway-champions_aspmyra-stadion_kjetil-knutsen_bjorn-mannsverk_k-junker_p-zinckernagel_j-p-hague_u-saltnes_i_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Aspmyra Stadion, by Stig-André Lippert at twitter.com/[@paabortebane]. Aerial shot of Bodø harbor and airstrip, photo from nordlandssykehuset.no. Aerial shot of Bodø, by Getty Images via forbes.com. Bodø air station with fighter plane aloft, photo from wikimapia.org/[Bodø airbase]. Bjørn Mannsverk beside fighter plane, photo by an.no via origo.hu/futball. Bodø/Glimt mental coach Bjørn Mannsverk, in a session with team-coach Håvard Sakariassen and captain Ulrik Saltnes, photo by Markus André Jensen via bodonu.no. Kjetil Knutsen, photo by Marius Simensen/Bildbyrån Norway via . Kjetil Knutsen with Bodø players, photo from time24.news. Kasper Junker, screenshot from video uploaded by Furkan Buğra Yolcu at youtube.com. Phillip Zinckernagel, screenshot from video uploaded by CSN Football Videos at youtube.com. Jens Peter Hauge, photo by @imagoimages via rossoneriblog.com. Ulrik Saltnes, photo by Mats Torbergsen (NTB scanpix) via nettavisen.no/sport. Bodø players celebrate after a goal, photo from glimt.no/om-klubben.




___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Blank map of Scandinavia, by NordNordWest at File:Scandinavia location map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Globe-map of Norway, by Rob984 at File:Europe-Norway (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-Inset map of Oslofjord region – which I drew, tracing the following maps…blank map of Oslofjord region, by Demis.nl via File:La2-demis-oslofjorden.png (commons.wikimedia.org); Demis Map Server; Map of Oslofjord, by Finnrind at File:Oslofjord.svg; + Open Street Map [Oslofjord].
-Counties map of Norway, by Furfur at File:Nye fylker – regjeringen.no.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Rankings: Norway club co-efficient: kassiesa.net; Norway national team: fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking.
-Norwegian football history: Det norske seriesystemet i fotball for menn (no.wikipedia.org).

May 7, 2021

Sweden: 2021 Allsvenskan – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-division (current clubs) & All-time Swedish titles list.

Filed under: Sweden — admin @ 9:18 am

sweden_2021-allsvenskan_map_seasons-in-1st-division_titles-list_post_d_.gif
Sweden: 2021 Allsvenskan – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-division (current clubs) & All-time Swedish titles list




By Bill Turianski on the 7th of May 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Sweden – Summary (table, fixtures, results, stats, etc) (soccerway.com)
-2021 Allsvenskan (en.wikipedia.org).


The map shows the 16 teams in the 2021 Allsvenskan, the top-flight football league of Sweden, which plays from April to November. On the map-page there are also two inset-maps: of Gothenburg (showing the 2 Allsvenskan clubs located there), and of Stockholm (showing the 3 Allsvenskan clubs located there). There is also a bit of demographic info on Sweden, found at the upper-left of the map-page. And below that is a list showing all 10 urban areas in Sweden that have a population above 100,000 {using data from this list: List of urban areas in Sweden by population}. And over at the top-right of the map-page are Sweden’s current football rankings… {As of May 2021: FIFA worldwide rank [national team]: #18; UEFA European rank [national team]: #13; National league-rank (UEFA): #23; Allsvenskan overall league average attendance [pre-COVID-19 pandemic]: 9,116 per game (2019).}

On the map…For each of the 16 Allsvenskan clubs of 2021, there is shown the following…
Location. Club crest.  Full club name, and year of origin. Stadium (and its capacity). 2019 average attendance [which was the most recent season before the COVID-19 pandemic affected attendance figures]. Swedish titles.

And there are 2 charts. One chart shows Seasons-in-Top-flight for the current clubs (2021 is the 97th season of top-flight football in Sweden). And another chart shows the All-time Swedish titles list (1896-1925; 1931-2020).

The map shows all the cities in the Scandinavian and Baltic Sea regions which have metro-area populations above 400,000. Those 15 cities are…St Petersburg (Russia), Stockholm (Sweden), Copenhagen (Denmark), Minsk (Belarus), Oslo (Norway), Helsinki (Finland), Gothenburg (Sweden), Gdansk (Poland), Kiel (Germany), Riga (Latvia), Malmo (Sweden), Kaliningrad (Russia), Vilnius (Lithuania), Bergen (Norway), Tallinn (Estonia).



The most successful clubs, and the best-drawing clubs, in Sweden…
The club with the most seasons played in the Swedish top flight is AIK of Solna, in Stockholm. The black-and-gold-clad AIK have played 92 of the 97 Swedish top-flight seasons, and 2021 is their 16th consecutive season in the 1st tier. (AIK’s dark-blue-and-gold castle-motif crest is pretty distinctive, and looks even better on their black home jerseys.) Second-most seasons in the top flight belongs to IFK Göteborg, of Gothenburg (the second city of Sweden). The blue-and-white-striped IFK Göteborg have played 85 top flight seasons – and 45 consecutive. Those 45 straight top flight seasons for IFK Göteborg is the current best in Sweden. As for the most Swedish titles, that honor goes to the light-blue-and-white-clad Malmö FF, of Malmö, who are reigning champions and have won the title 21 times. Malmö FF is where Zlatan Ibrahimović got his start. (Malmö, which is connected to Copenhagen, Denmark, via the Øresund bridge/tunnel, is the 3rd-largest city in Sweden.)

And there you have what many refer to as the Big 3 of Sweden…AIK, IFK Göteborg, and Malmö FF. The three entered into an informal alliance in the 1970s under the partnership name ‘The Three Traditional Teams of Sweden’. And the three have produced the most players who ended up playing for the Swedish national team (although these days over 75% of the Swedish national team plays abroad). {Big Three (Sweden) (en.wikipedia.org).}

However, calling those three clubs (AIK, Göteborg, and Malmö) the Big 3 ignores a couple of significant aspects of Swedish football. Because there is one club that draws as well as, and wins as many titles as, members of this Big 3. That club is Djurgården {see next paragraph}. And also because, these days, there is one club which draws better than the Big 3 in Sweden, and that is Stockholm’s green-and-white-clad Hammarby IF. Although they draw over 20-thousand-per-game, Hammarby have only won one title, in 2001. Hammarby is a club that is traditionally comprised of more left-wing supporters than the other two big Stockholm clubs. Despite its large following, Hammarby has very often been either relegation-threatened or stuck in the second division. Hammarby used to play at the 12,000-capacity Söderstadion, in Söderort (the southern suburban part of the Stockholm Municipality). And circa 1998 to 2007, Hammarby were often playing to nearly-full-capacity there, drawing in the 10.9-K to 16.0-K range, which was still not enough to lead the country in football attendance (attendance leader in Sweden in that 10-year time-frame was either AIK or Malmö). That changed when Hammarby (along with Djurgården) moved into the new 30,000-capacity Tele2 Arena in September 2013. For Hammarby, it was a move of a only a ½ kilometer to the new stadium. In 2014, in their first full season at the new and much larger venue, second-division Hammarby won promotion, and led all of Sweden in attendance, at 20-K per game. In the following season of 2015, Hammarby, now back in the top flight, drew a record-setting 25.5-K-per game. And so now Hammarby are the best-drawing Swedish club, and drew in the 22-K to 25-K-range in the five seasons between 2015 and ’19. {2019 Allsvenskan attendances from E-F-S site}. So in that sense, Hammarby are sort of like the Newcastle United of Sweden – a club that has a huge fan base yet have an almost barren trophy cabinet and are often relegation-threatened.

And meanwhile, there is a Swedish club outside the Big 3 that draws better than one of the Big 3, and is just as successful as another of the Big 3. That club is the navy-blue-and-light-blue-clad Djurgårdens IF, of Stockholm, who were the 2019 title-winners. Djurgården have won just as many titles as local rivals AIK (12 titles each). Djurgården draws only slightly less than AIK (Djurgården drew 15.9-K in 2019, compared to AIK’s 18.9-K), but Djurgården draws better than IFK Göteborg (who drew 12.8-K in 2019). Djurgården are popularly known as the posh club of Stockholm. Djurgården played at the 30-K-capacity stadium-with-running-track Stockholms Stadion, in Stockholm’s north-eastern side, for 68 years (1936-1993). In 2013 they moved to southern Stockholm into the new Tele2 Arena (along with Hammarby). But Djurgården have not had the huge attendance-increase, like Hammarby, at the new stadium, but are drawing well nonetheless, drawing between 12.3-K and 16.2-K in the five seasons from 2015 to ’19. I think one would have to discount Hammarby for lack of titles, but Djurgården belongs in the conversation about the biggest clubs in Sweden: it really should be the Big 4.

But even that would be inaccurate, because there is another successful Swedish club with a decent sized fanbase that deserves a mention here. And that is the white-and-blue-clad IFK Norrköping, from the small city of Norrköping (population 95,000). IFK Norrköping have won the third-most Swedish titles – 13 (most recently in 2015). Norrköping have played the fourth-most seasons in the Allsvenskan – 80. From 2015 to ’19, Norrköping have drawn in the 8.4-K to 10.4-K-range, which is not bad at all for a club from a city with slightly less than 100,000 inhabitants.

At the time of this posting [Friday 7 May 2021], after 4 games, Djurgården leads the Allsvenskan, with 4 wins (including beating Malmö 3-1 last weekend).

{Here is a link to a post I made on the highest-drawing football clubs from the Nordic countries [from July 2016]. It features illustrations for the 5 Swedish clubs which had drawn above 10,000-per-game in 2015 (Hammarby, AIK, Malmö FF, Djurgården, IFK Göteborg, Norrköping).}.

{flashscore.co.uk/football/sweden/allsvenskan.}



___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Blank map of Scandinavia, by NordNordWest at File:Scandinavia location map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Globe-map of Sweden, by Rob984 at File:EU-Sweden_(orthographic_projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-Map of Gothenburg area, segment of map by NordNordWest at File:Sweden location map, 40south.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Map of Greater Stockholm, segment of map by Eric Frohne at File:Sweden Stockholm location map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Attendance figures, european-football-statistics.co.uk.
-Football rankings, football-ranking.com.
-Goteborgs IF crest, from klubbmarken.com/goteborg.htm.

April 18, 2021

2021 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 32-team Group Stage, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed); plus 2 charts: Libertadores titles by club & by country.

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 4:44 pm

conmebol_copa-libertadores_2021_location-map_group-stage_32-teams_post_c_.gif
2021 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 32-team Group Stage, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed); plus 2 charts: Libertadores titles by club & by country




By Bill Turianski on the 18th of April 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2021 Copa Libertadores/Group Stage (en.wikipedia.org).
-Summary – CONMEBOL Libertadores [2021] (soccerway.com).

The Group Stage (of 32) begins on 20-22 April (1st game-week).
The Group Stage, consisting of 6 match-weeks, will last six weeks – no break weeks this season. This is of course because the tournament was delayed in starting, due to the COVID pandemic.

The preliminary stages finished 13-15 April, and of the 19 preliminary-stage teams, the four teams to survive were:
Atlético Nacional (COL), Independiente del Valle (ECU), Junior (COL), Santos (BRA).

So that makes the breakdown for the 2021 Libertadores Group Stage the following…
Brazil, 7 teams (6 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries] + the Cup Holder: Palmeiras).
Argentina, 6 teams (5 teams + the Copa Sudamericana winner: Defensa y Justicia).
Colombia, 4 teams [including 2 teams from the preliminaries].
Ecuador, 3 teams [including 1 team from the preliminaries].
Uruguay, 2 teams.
Paraguay, 2 teams.
Chile, 2 teams.
Peru, 2 teams.
Bolivia, 2 teams.
Venezuela, 2 teams.

There are two clubs making their Libertadores Group Stage debuts
•Rentistas. From Montevideo, Uruguay, located in the Cerrito neighborhood in the northern part of the city (about 13 km/8 miles north of central Montevideo). Club Atlético Rentistas have played 28 seasons of top flight fútbol. Rentistas are somewhat of a yo-yo club, with 7 separate spells in the Uruguayan Primera División since 1971. Rentistas won promotion from the second tier in 2019. Then, back in the top flight after a four-year absence, they finished tied for first, with Club Nacional, in the 2020 Uruguayan Primera División Apertura (15-game mini-season which ended in October). That alone gave them qualification for the 2021 Libertadores Group Stage. Rentistas went on to win the Apertura tie-breaker match with Nacional in mid-October 2020. But in April 2021, Rentistas lost to Nacional in the 3-team 2020 Uruguayan Primera División Championship Play-offs, losing 3-1 aggregate. Rentistas play in the 10,600-capacity Estadio Complejo Rentistas (opened 1998), which is owned by the club. Here is a recent aerial photo (from August 2020) of Estadio Complejo Rentistas {twitter.com/[@nahuelzn}. Rentistas wear red jerseys and white pants.
•Unión La Calera. From La Calera, in an interior valley within the Valparaiso region of Chile, located (by road) 114 km (71 mi) north-west of Santiago. La Calera is rather small to have a top-flight club: it has a population of around 50,000 {2017 figure}. Unión La Calera have played 24 seasons of top flight fútbol (including 8 of the last 10 seasons). In the 2020 Chilean Primera División, Unión La Calera were runners-up to Universidad Católica, thus qualifying for the group stage of the 2021 Libertadores. Unión La Calera play at Estadio Municipal Nicolás Chahuán Nazar, which has a 9,200 capacity. Here is a photo of the futuristic municipal stadium that Unión La Calera play in {plataformaarquitectura.cl/estadio-municipal-nicolas-chahuan-nazar}. The venue-site dates back to 1950, but the original stadium was demolished, and an entrirely new stadium was constructed in 2017-19. Unión La Calera wear all-red kits and have a simple yet smart-looking crest which is a disk in two shades of red, with a U-L-C sans-serif wordmark in navy blue and green.

...


___
Thanks to all at the links below...
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-Blank map of Greater Buenos Aires, by NordNordWest at File:Argentina Greater Buenos Aires location map.svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-2021 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2019 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

Thanks to James Nalton at World Football Index.com for tweets & re-tweets {World Football Index.com}.

April 3, 2021

1967 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’67 World Series champions the St. Louis Cardinals & AL and NL Stats Leaders.

Filed under: Baseball,Baseball: 1967 map w/jersey logos,Retro maps — admin @ 2:35 pm

http://billsportsmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/mlb_map-of-mlb-1967_20-teams_ws-champions-st-louis-cardinals_1967-attendances_stats-leaders_post_e_.gif
MLB: 1967 season – Location-map with cap-logos and uniform-logos, plus 1967 team-attendances, stats leaders, and final standings; World Series champions – the St. Louis Cardinals



By Bill Turianski on the 3rd of April 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1967 MLB season (en.wikipedia.org).
-1967 MLB (baseball-reference.com).
-Year in Review: 1967 American League (baseball-almanac.com).
-Year in Review: 1967 National League (baseball-almanac.com).
-1967 MLB logos (sportslogos.net).

1967 MLB Location-map with Jersey-logos & Attendances, featuring the ’67 World Series champions the St. Louis Cardinals & AL and NL Stats Leaders.
The map shows the locations of the 20 Major League Baseball teams of 1967. On the map, next to each MLB team’s location-dot there are 3 things: their cap-logo, one of their jersey-logos (either home or away jersey), and a rectangular box that lists the team’s ballpark back then, plus their win total for the 1967 season, as well as their home average attendance that year. Any other logos on the team’s uniforms that year are also shown (specifically, shoulder-patch-logos, of which there were 5 of such in 1967: for the Astros, the Braves, the Cubs, the Mets, and the Twins).

The jersey-logos are either from a photo of the old jerseys (see photo credits at the foot of this post) or illustrations of such (mainly from sportslogos.net). The jersey-logo for each team is sized to reflect that team’s 1967 average attendance: the larger the jersey-logo, the higher the attendance that year. The best drawing MLB team in 1967 were the eventual champions, the St. Louis Cardinals, at 25,804 per game. Second-best drawing ball club in 1967 was the AL pennant-winning Boston Red Sox, who drew 21,331 per game. Worst-drawing ball clubs in 1967 were the Cleveland Indians, and the soon-to-be relocated Kansas City Athletics (both drew below 9,000 per game).

The whole list of 1967 attendance-figures-by-team is found at the far right-hand side of the map-page. Also listed there are each team’s Win total for that year, as well as their Numerical Change-in-average-attendance from the previous season (of 1966).

At the far left-hand side of the map-page are the 1967 AL and NL final standings. Then there is a section which shows the 1967 World Series result (Cardinals defeated Red Sox in 7 games), and features a photo of the 1967 World Series MVP (Bob Gibson, seen striking out a Red Sox player at Fenway Park). Below that are listed the 1967 major award-winners (the MVP award winners, the Cy Young award winners, and the Rookie of the Year award winners).

At the foot of the map-page are 1967 MLB Statistical Leaders (in both the American League and the National League), in the following categories: Wins, ERA, WAR for Pitchers; Batting Average, Home Runs, RBIs, WAR for Position Players. A photo of each player is shown, with stats; photo credits are at the foot of this post.

And finally, at the top of the map-page is a section for the 1967 MLB champions, the St. Louis Cardinals. I featured photos of the 11 players on the ’67 Cardinals with the highest WAR [Wins Above Replacement], plus the their manager, Red Schoendienst. Photo credits are at the foot of this post. The players are: Orlando Cepeda (1B), Tim McCarver (C), Lou Brock (LF), Curt Flood (CF), Dick Hughes (RHP), Nelson Briles (RHP), Roger Maris (RF), Steve Carlton (LHP), Bob Gibson (RHP), Julian Javier (2B), Dal Maxville (SS).




St. Louis Cardinals – 1967 World Series champions.
The 1967 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team’s 86th season in St. Louis, Missouri, and its 76th season in the National League. 1967 was the Cardinals’ first full season at Busch Memorial Stadium. (Busch Stadium was a 49,000-capacity multi-purpose facility that the Cardinals first played in on May 12, 1966. The Cardinals played there from 1966 to 2005, sharing it with the St. Louis football Cardinals for 22 years (1966-87), until the football Cardinals moved to Arizona. Busch Memorial Stadium’s distinctive 96-arch “Crown of Arches” echoed the Gateway Arch nearby that had just been completed in early 1966 {you can see the crown of arches in the Orlando Cepeda photo at the foot of the map-page}. Busch Stadium’s playing surface was originally grass, but it was changed to artificial turf in 1970 to better survive the punishment that pro football gave the turf; in 1995, following an extensive renovation, the grass returned. Here is a nice illustrated article on Busch Memorial Stadium from the site called This Great Game.com… Busch Memorial Stadium – St. Loui, Missouri.)

Prior to the 1967 season, Cardinals owner August “Gussie” Busch, Jr. hired former outfielder (and future Hall of Famer) Stan Musial as general manager. The ’67 Cardinals team featured four future Hall of Famers: speedster Lou Brock, righty Bob Gibson, lefty Steve Carlton and first baseman Orlando Cepeda. The Ponce, Puerto Rico-born Orlando Cepeda, who nicknamed the team “El Birdos”, led the NL in RBIs and was voted the league’s MVP. The Cardinals survived a mid-season knee injury to their pitching ace, Bob Gibson. Gibson missed about one-third of his starts that year, but was ably filled in by Dick Hughes. And St. Louis led the National League comfortably for most of the season. The Cardinals went 101–60, and won the NL pennant by 10½ games over the San Francisco Giants. Then they faced the Boston Red Sox in the 1967 World Series, in early October.

The Red Sox, meanwhile, reached the post-season after one of the wildest and most tightly-contested pennant-races in Major League history. In September of the 1967 AL season, no fewer than 4 teams could have won the American League pennant. On September 7th, the Minnesota Twins, the Detroit Tigers, the Chicago White Sox, and the Boston Red Sox were all tied for first place. The White Sox fell off the pace near the end of September, but on the final day of the season (Oct. 1), the Red Sox and Twins were tied for the lead, with the Tigers one-half-game behind. The Red Sox beat the Twins 5-3 that day, and the Tigers won only the first game of a doubleheader against the Angels. And so the Red Sox, led by Triple Crown winner Carl Yastrzemski and AL Cy Young winner Jim Lonborg, won the ’67 AL pennant by one game over both the Tigers and the Twins. Here is a great article from SABR.org, The 1967 AL Pennant Race: The 30,315,229 to 1 Possibility, by Andy Andres at sabr.org.

The 1967 World Series went to 7 games. Although the Cardinals had lost games 5 and 6, they won the seventh thanks to a third rock-solid outing by Bob Gibson. In the 1967 Fall Classic, Bob Gibson gave up only 3 earned runs and 14 hits in 27 innings, pitching three complete games, striking out 26, and walking only 6. Needless to say, Bob Gibson was voted the MVP of the Series.

After the 1967 season, the Kansas City Athletics moved to Oakland, California as the Oakland A’s. The following season of 1968 was the last to feature only one division per league. Then in 1969, Major League Baseball would undergo a four-team expansion (to 24 teams), with both the American and National Leagues split into two 6-team divisions.




___
Photos of jersey logos used on the map-page…
-1967 St. Louis Cardinals road jersey (Orlando Cepeda #30), photo from scpauctions.com.
-1967 Chicago White Sox road jersey logo , photo from sports.ha.com.
-1967 Cincinnati Reds home jersey logo, photo from amazon.com.
-1965-69 Cleveland Indians road jersey (vest) logo, photo from sports.ha.com.
-1967-68 Pittsburgh Pirates road jersey (vest) logo, photo from lelands.com.
-1967-68 SF Giants road jersey logo, photo from sports.ha.com.
-1959-69 LA Dodgers road jersey logo, photo from customthrowbackjerseys.com.
-1965-70 California Angels road jersey logo, photo from sports.ha.com.
-ca. 1967 NY Yankees road jersey logo, photo from customthrowbackjerseys.com.
-ca. 1967 NY Mets road jersey logo, photo from robertedwardauctions.com.

Photos of Cardinals players on map page…
-Orlando Cepeda [photo circa 1967] , photo of the cover of Street & Smith’s 1968 Baseball magazine, from art.com.
-Tim McCarver [photo from 1967], photo of the cover of Sports Illustrated (Sept. 4 1967) by John G. Zimmerman/Sports Illustrated via Getty Images via sicovers.com.
-Lou Brock [photo from 1967], photo of the cover of Sports Illustrated (Sept. 4 1967) by Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated via Getty Images via sicovers.com.
-Curt Flood [photo circa 1968], photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images via calltothepen.com.
-Dick Hughes [1969 Topps card], from amazon.com.
-Nelson Briles [photo from 1967], by Herb Scharfman/unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Roger Maris [photo circa 1968], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Steve Carlton [photo circa 1967], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Bob Gibson [photo circa 1966], photo from si.com.
-Julian Javier [1967 Topps card], from amazon.com.
-Dal Maxvill [photo circa 1968], photo from Bettman Archive via gettyimages.com.
-Red Schoendienst, Cardinals manager [photo circa 1964], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-1967 St. Louis Cardinals uniforms: illustrations by Marc Okkonen at exhibits.baseballhalloffame.org/dressed_to_the_nines/[1967 St. Louis].
-Bob Gibson [photo from 1967 WS], photo by Walter Iooss Jr, at si.com[/Bob Gibson photo gallery].

Photos of 1967 MLB leaders on map page…
-Phil Niekro [photo circa 1967], unattributed at asupervip.top.
-Joel Horlen [photo circa 1967], unattributed at twitter.com/[@super70ssports].
-Mike McCormick [photo circa 1965], unattributed at bleacherreport.com.
-Jim Lonborg [photo circa 1967], unattributed at galleryofchampions.com.
-Earl Wilson [photo circa 1968], unattributed at vintagedetroit.com/blog.
-Jim Bunning [photo circa 1967], unattributed at si.com.
-Jim Merritt [photo from 1967], photo by Diamond Images /Getty Images via gettyimages.com.
-Roberto Clemente [photo circa 1968], unattributed at espn.com.
-Carl Yastrzemski [photo from 1967 WS], photo by Getty Images/Focus on Sports via newsday.com/sports.
-Hank Aaron [photo circa 1966], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Carl Yastrzemski [screenshot image circa 1969], from video uploaded by Butch From the Cape at youtube.com.
-Harmon Killebrew [photo circa 1969], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Orlando Cepeda [photo circa 1968], unattributed at archcity.media.
-Carl Yastrzemski [Sports Illustrated cover Aug 21 1967], unattributed at pinterest.com.
-Ron Santo [photo circa 1968], photo by Luis Requena MLB/via Getty Images via gettyimages.com.
-Carl Yastrzemski [photo circa 1967], unattributed at geni.com.

Thanks to all at the following links…
-Base map, by US federal government employee at commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:StatesU.svg.
-Baseball-Reference.com.
-1967 Major League Baseball season (en.wikipedia.org).

March 25, 2021

2021 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list (1948-2019).

Filed under: Hockey,NCAA, ice hockey — admin @ 12:45 pm

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2021 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament: map of the 16 teams that qualified. With 2019-20 attendance data, and all-time Titles-&-Frozen-Four-appearances list.





By Bill Turianski on the 25th of March 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2021 NCAA Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Tournament.
-USCHO.com.
-Schedule, scores, etc…collegehockeynews.com/schedules.

Please note: on the map-page, there is a schedule for the first round of the 2021 NCAA Division I Hockey Tournament (at the upper right-hand corner). I put that there instead of the usual – which is current attendance data of the qualified teams. I scrapped that this year for obvious reasons. The other change to the template is that I added tiny conference-logos, beside each of the 16 qualified teams, on the map. And under the small chart showing qualified-teams-by-conference, I listed all 16 teams alphabetically. And in that alphabetic list I show each team’s total Tournament appearances. (Michigan and Minnesota have the most tournament appearances – 38 – followed by Boston University with 37, Boston College with 36, North Dakota with 33, and Denver with 30.)

Note on my site’s existence…I have had serious trouble with my website, and this might be the last post I can make here. If that happens, the plan is to scrap this site here, and start anew, on a new site I will be calling billsportsmaps.net. That’s the plan, anyway. You can keep up on this by checking in at my twitter feed, twitter.com/billsportsmaps.




___
Thanks to all at the following links…
-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Two Hearted River at en.wikipedia.org/[each teams' page at Wikipedia], for segments of jersey illustrations of some teams (Boston University, Minnesota-Duluth, Wisconsin).
-Thanks to Fernando Martello for the illustration of the Michigan road jersey logo, at File:Michigan wolverines hockey unif.png (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to BC Interruption for the photo of the Boston College jersey logo.
-Thanks to Eswany33 for illustration of Minnesota jersey logo, File:Gopher Hockey Uniforms 2020-21.svg.
-Thanks to Minnesota State Mavericks site for photo of home jersey (gold) script-logo, msumavericks.com/index.
-Thanks to Vintage Minnesota Hockey for the illustration of the Minnesota State away jersey (purple), history.vintagemnhockey.com/[Minnesota State Uniform Evolution].

March 14, 2021

2021 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament (aka March Madness) – the 68 teams: map, with team locations & 2019-20 average attendances listed.

Filed under: NCAA Men's Basketball — admin @ 9:34 pm

2021_ncaa-basketball-tournament_march-madness_68-teams_location-map_post_c_.gif
2021 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament (aka March Madness) – the 68 teams: map, with team locations & 2019-20 average attendances listed




By Bill Turianski on the 14th of March 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-Teams, etc…2021 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament.
-Scores…Div I college bk scores (espn.go.com).

    The 68 Teams which qualified for the 2021 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament [aka March Madness]

Listed by: Name. Conference. Location of arena(s)…

-Abilene Christian Wildcats. Southland. Abilene, TX.
-Alabama Crimson Tide. SEC. Tuscaloosa, AL.
-Appalachian State Mountaineers. Sun Belt. Boone, NC.
-Arkansas Razorbacks. SEC. Fayetteville, AR.
-Baylor Bears. Big 12. Waco, TX.
-BYU [Brigham Young Univ.] Cougars. West Coast. Provo, UT.
-Clemson Tigers. ACC. Clemson, SC.
-Cleveland State Vikings. Horizon. Cleveland, OH.
-Colgate Raiders. Patriot. Hamilton, NY.
-Colorado Buffaloes. Pac-12. Boulder, CO.
-Creighton Bluejays. Big East. Omaha, NE.
-Drake Bulldogs. Missouri Valley. Des Moines, IA.
-Drexel Dragons. Colonial. Philadelphia, PA.
-Eastern Washington Eagles. Big Sky. Cheney, WA.
-Florida Gators. SEC. Gainesville, FL.
-Florida State Seminoles. ACC. Tallahassee, FL.
-Georgetown Hoyas. Big East. Washington, DC.
-Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. ACC. Atlanta, GA.
-Gonzaga Bulldogs. West Coast. Spokane, WA.
-Grand Canyon Antelopes. WAC. Phoenix, AZ.
-Hartford Hawks. America East. West Hartford, CT.
-Houston Cougars. American. Houston, TX.
-Illinois Fighting Illini. Big Ten. Champaign, IL.
-Iona Gaels. Metro-Atlantic. New Rochelle, NY.
-Iowa Hawkeyes. Big Ten. Iowa City, IA.
-Kansas Jayhawks. Big 12. Lawrence, KS.
-Liberty Flames. Atlantic Sun. Lynchburg, VA.
-Loyola-Chicago Ramblers. Missouri Valley. Chicago, IL.
-LSU [Louisiana State U.] Tigers. SEC. Baton Rouge, LA.
-Maryland Terrapins. Big Ten. College Park, MD.
-Michigan Wolverines. Big Ten. Ann Arbor, MI.
-Michigan State Spartans. Big Ten. East Lansing, MI.
-Missouri Tigers. SEC. Columbia, MO.
-Morehead State Eagles. Ohio Valley. Morehead, KY.
-Mount St. Mary’s Mountaineers. Northeast. Emmitsburg, MD.
-Norfolk State Spartans. Mid-Eastern. Norfolk, VA.
-North Carolina Tar Heels. ACC. Chapel Hill, NC.
-North Texas Mean Green. Conference-USA. Denton, Texas.
-Ohio State Buckeyes. Big Ten. Columbus, MD.
-Ohio University Bobcats. Mid-American. Athens, OH.
-Oklahoma Sooners. Big 12. Norman, OK.
-Oklahoma State Cowboys. Big 12. Stillwater, OK.
-Oral Roberts Golden Eagles. Summit League. Tulsa, OK.
-Oregon Ducks. Pac-12. Eugene, OR.
-Oregon State Beavers. Pac-112. Corvallis, OR.
-Purdue Boilermakers. Big Ten. West Lafayette, IN.
-Rutgers Scarlet Knights. Big Ten. Piscataway, NJ.
-St. Bonaventure Bonnies. Atlantic-10. Olean, NY.
-San Diego State Aztecs. Mountain West. San Diego, CA.
-Syracuse Orange. ACC. Syracuse, NY.
-Tennessee Volunteers. SEC. Knoxville, TN.
-Texas Longhorns. Big 12. Austin, TX.
-Texas Southern Tigers. SWAC. Houston, TX.
-Texas Tech Red Raiders. Big 12. Lubbock, TX.
-UCLA [Univ. California Los Angeles] Bruins. Pac-12. Los Angeles, CA.
-UConn [Univ. Connecticut] Huskies. Big East. Storrs, CT / Hartford, CT.
-UC Santa Barbara Gauchos. Big West. Santa Barbara, CA.
-UNC Greensboro Spartans. Southern. Greensboro, NC.
-USC [Univ. Southern California] Trojans. Pac-12. Los Angeles, CA.
-Utah State Aggies. Mountain West. Logan, UT.
-VCU [Virginia Commonwealth Univ.] Rams. Atlantic 10.
-Villanova Wildcats. Gig East. Villanova, PA / Philadelphia, PA.
-Virginia Cavaliers. ACC. Charlottesville, VA.
-Virginia Tech Hokies. ACC. Blacksburg, VA.
-West Virginia Mountaineers. Big 12. Morgantown, WV.
-Wichita State Shockers. The American. Wichita, KS.
-Winthrop Eagles. Big South. Rock Hill, SC.
-Wisconsin Badgers. Big Ten. Madison, WI.





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-Thanks to AMK1211 for blank map of USA, ‘File:Blank US Map with borders.svg”>File:Blank US Map with borders.svg‘ (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to the contributors to the pages at en.wikipedia.org, ‘2021 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament’.
-Thanks to NCAA for attendance figures, from 2020 NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL ATTENDANCE (For All NCAA Men’s Varsity Teams) [pdf].
-Thanks to the Bracket Matrix site for bracket forecasting, bracketmatrix.com; twitter.com/@bracketproject.

March 4, 2021

Netherlands: 2020-21 Eredivisie – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & Dutch professional titles list.

Filed under: Netherlands — admin @ 10:35 pm

netherlands_2020-21-eredivisie_location-map_seasons-in-1st-div_dutch-titles-list_post_f_.gif
Netherlands: 2020-21 Eredivisie – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & All-time Dutch titles list



By Bill Turianski on the 4th of March 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Summary – Eredivisie – Netherlands – results, fixtures, tables, stats, etc (soccerway.com).
-2020-21 Eredivisie (en.wikipedia.org).

The map shows the 18 clubs in the 2020-21 Eredivisie, the top-flight of the Netherlands. The Eredivisie was founded in 1956, two years after the introduction of professionalism in the Netherlands. That makes this the 65th season of the competition. There was no champion last season, because the competition was abandoned due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 2018-19 champions were Ajax of Amsterdam – the most successful Dutch club – and Ajax are on course to win the title again, with a 6-point lead as of the 5th of March (with 11 or 12 games to be played).

At the right-hand side of the map-page are two charts. The top chart shows the Seasons-in-1st-division for the current clubs. Also listed are the consecutive seasons each club has currently spent in the top-flight. Longest serving clubs are the big 3 of the Netherlands – Ajax (of Amsterdam) Feyenoord (of Rotterdam), and PSV (of Eindhoven). All 3 were founding members of the Eredivisie, and all 3 have never been relegated. The second chart is the all-time pro titles list for the Netherlands. As mentioned, the Eredivisie was established two years after Dutch clubs could turn pro. So I have included the winners of the final two 48-team Dutch National Championships, in 1954-55 (winner: Willem II) and 1955-56 (winner: Rapid JC).

The map itself includes the 12 provinces and 14 largest cities of the Netherlands. At the foot of the map, the populations of those 14 largest Dutch cities are listed (with the provinces they are located in). Finally, I added all the major rivers and waterways of the Netherlands, including the main canals.




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Thanks to Lencer at en.wikipedia.org, for the blank map of Netherlands, File:Netherlands location map.svg.
Thanks to the contributors at Eredivisie (en.wikipedia.org).

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