billsportsmaps.com

October 14, 2018

NFL 1961 season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Green Bay Packers.

Filed under: NFL>1961 map/season,NFL/ Gridiron Football,Retro maps — admin @ 8:26 am

nfl_1961_map-with-helmets_1961-standings_offensive-stats-leaders_home-jerseys_green-bay-packers-champs_post_d_.gif
NFL 1961 season, map with helmets/jerseys and final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Green Bay Packers.




By Bill Turianski on 14 October 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1961 NFL season
-1961 NFL Championship Game (en.wikipedia.org).
-1961 NFL season (pro-football-reference.com).
-Article on Green Bay Packers’ “Heisman/Wisconsin” logo used in late -1950s/early-1960s, The Return of an Old Friend (by Chance Michaels at packersuniforms.blogspot.com from Sept 2010).

    1961 NFL Championship Game: the Green Bay Packers demolish the New York Giants 37-0.
    (The win started the Packers’ unequaled run of 5 NFL titles in 7 years.)

-Birth of a dynasty 1961 Packers would not be denied (by Martin Hendricks on Oct 5 2011 at Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel).

green-bay-packers_1961-nfl-champs_packers-beat-giants_37-0_new-city-field_vince-lombardi_paul-hornung_jim-taylor_ron-kramer_ray-nitschke_willie-davis_bart-starr_k_.gif

Photo and Image credits above -
1961 NFL title game ticket, from sports.ha.com. New City Field was covered with one foot of hay, to protect the turf from the cold, for a whole month prior to the 1961 NFL Championship Game, photos from Green Bay Press-Gazette Archive via packerville.blogspot.com. Packers TE Ron Kramer scores a TD mid-way through the 2nd Q (21-0), photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Packers FB Jim Taylor on a run, screenshot from pinterest.com via packersnews.com [link broken]. Packers HB/K Paul Hornung on a run, photo by Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated at si.com. Packers MLB Ray Nitschke sacks Giants QB Y.A. Tittle, photo by Robert Riger at gettyimages.com. Packers DE Willie Davis sacks Y.A. Tittle, photo by Green Bay Press-Gazette at greenbaypressgazette.com. After the final whistle, Packers players carry their head coach, Vince Lombardi, off the field, photo by Green Bay Press-Gazette via lohud.com. Packers fans tear down the goal posts, photo by AP via archive.jsonline.com. Vince Lombardi with his 3 main offensive threats in 1961 (L-R): FB Jim Taylor, HB/K Paul Hornung, QB Bart Starr [photo from Dec 3 1961 after clinching the '61 NFL West], photo unattributed at reddit.com/r/OldSchoolCool. “Heisman/Wisconsin” logo used by Packers in late-1950s/early-1960s, packersuniforms.blogspot.com.

1961 Green Bay Packers: 6 All-Pro players; plus 9 from the ’61 Packers were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Note: All-Pro, below, means: 1961 AP, 1st team.
-Paul Hornung (HB/K): 1961 All-Pro (RB), and 1961 MVP [AP]; Hornung was inducted to the HoF in 1986.
-Jim Ringo: 1961 All-Pro (C); Ringo was inducted to the HoF in 1981.
-Bill Forester: 1961 All-Pro (LB).
-Henry Jordan: 1961 All-Pro (DT).
-Fuzzy Thurston: 1961 All-Pro (G).
-Jesse Whittenton: 1961 All-Pro (CB).
-Jim Taylor (FB); Taylor was inducted into the HoF in 1976.
-Bart Starr (QB); Starr was inducted into the HoF in 1977.
-Forrest Gregg (T); Gregg was inducted into the HoF in 1977.
-Herb Adderley (CB/KR); Adderley was inducted into the HoF in 1980.
-Ray Nitschke (LB); Nitschke was inducted into the HoF in 1981.
-Willie Davis (DE); Davis was inducted into the HoF in 1981.
-Vince Lombardi (Head coach of the Packers from 1959-67). Lombardi was inducted into the HoF in 1971.

Helmet and uniforms changes for 1961 NFL…
Below: In 1961, four NFL teams introduced helmet-logos (Vikings, Packers, Lions, Giants).
nfl_1961_4-new-helmet-logos_vikings_packers_lions_giants_e_.gif
1961 NFL teams’ uniforms at Gridiron Uniform Database.
-Expansion team (1961 Minnesota Vikings): the Vikings were so named to reflect the large Scandinavian population in the state of Minnesota. Since their inception in 1961, the Vikings have always worn a purple helmet with viking-horns on each side, with a bit of yellow trim at the base of the viking-horn. Unfortunately, this is a miss-representation of history, because viking invaders (Norsemen) never wore horned helmets. Just think for a moment how impractical and downright dangerous a horned helmet would be to wear into battle: you would always be snagging the horns on things, to say nothing about how it would throw your balance off. The fact is, the only time Norsemen wore horned helmets in battle was in the theatrical productions of Wagner operas first staged in the late Nineteenth century. ‘When Wagner staged his “Der Ring des Nibelungen” opera cycle in the 1870s, costume designer Carl Emil Doepler created horned helmets for the Viking characters, and an enduring stereotype was born.’ {-quote from history.com/news/did-vikings-really-wear-horned-helmets.} So the Minnesota Vikings helmet-logo is based on an historical myth, because vikings never wore horned helmets, at all, when they were busy invading, sacking and pillaging back in the 8th through 11th centuries.

-In 1961, the Green Bay Packers introduced their helmet-logo…‘The oval “G” logo was added in 1961 when [Vince] Lombardi asked Packers equipment manager Gerald ‘Dad’ Braisher to design a logo. Braisher tasked his assistant, St. Norbert College art student John Gordon. Satisfied with a football-shaped letter “G”, the pair presented it to Lombardi, who then approved the addition.’ {-from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bay_Packers#Logo.} The football-shaped-letter-G helmet-logo remains, though in 1970, the football-shaped-G became more oval-shaped (less pointed at the ends; see below).
Below: the Packers’ helmet-logo was introduced in 1961. In 1970, the Packers’ logo became more oval-shaped…
green-bay-packers_1969_1970_helmet-logo-made-oval-shaped_c_.gif

-In 1961, the Detroit Lions introduced their helmet-logo, of a blue rampant lion in silhouette. The blue-rampant-lion helmet-logo remains, and since 2003, the rampant-lion has had detailing: a thin black outline was added in 2002, and interior details in white were added in 2009.

Below: the Lions’ helmet-logo was introduced in 1961. It remains essentially the same, w/ outline added in 1970, and detailing added in the 2000s…
detroit-lions_1961_helmet-logo_rampant-lion_1970_2003_2009_c_.gif

-In 1961, the New York Giants introduced their helmet-logo, of their city’s initials, NY, in a bold lower-case sans-serif font, with the tail of the y stretched to fit under the n-y, thus forming a square-block shape. The block-shaped-lowercase-N-Y helmet-logo was dropped following the 1974 season, but was re-introduced in 2000.

Below: the NY Giants’ lowercase-NY helmet-logo was introduced in 1962; it remained for 14 years & was re-introduced in 2000…
new-york-giants_1961_helmet-logo_lower-case-ny-logo_1975_1976_2000_b_.gif"

___
Photo and Image credits on map page…
Packers players on map page,
Reproduction of early-1960s Packers helmet, from ebay.com. Early-1960s Packers pennant, from sports.mearsonlineauctions.com. Bart Starr [photo circa 1964], photo unattributed at citelighter.com. Bart Starr and Paul Hornung [photo from 1962], photo by Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated at si.com/nfl/photos.Jim Ringo [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at ebay via thepostgame.com. Forrest Gregg [photo circa 1964], photo unattributed at packers.com. Fuzzy Thurston and Paul Hornung [photo circa 1964], photo unattributed at valpoathletics.com.
Henry Jordan and Willie Davis [photo circa 1962], photo Vernon Biever at nfl.com via pinterest.com. Bill Forester [1963 Topps trading card], from footballcardgallery.com. Ray Nitschke [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at dailydsports.com/ray-nitschke. Herb Adderley [photo from 1961 or '62], photo unattributed at ebay.com via pinterest.com. Jesse Whittenton [photo from 1960], photo unattributed at packers.com. Jim Taylor [photo from 1961], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Max McGee [photo from 1961], photo by Marvin E. Newman at gettyimages.com.
Willie Wood

Offensive stats leaders on map page,
Bill Wade (Bears) [photo from 1961], photo by Ray Gora/Chicago Tribune at chicagotribune.com. Sonny Jurgensen (Eagles) [photo from 1963], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Jim Brown (Browns) [photo from 1961], photo by Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated at si.com/nfl/photos/jim-brown-rare-photos. Jim Taylor (Packers) [photo from 1962], photo by Green Bay Press-Gazette via packershistory.net. Tommy McDonald (Eagles) [photo from 1960], photo unattributed at thenumerati.net.

-Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to the contributors at pro-football-reference.com
-Thanks to the contributors at NFL 1961 season (en.wikipedia.org).
Special thanks to Tim Brulia, Bill Schaefer and Rob Holecko of The Gridiron Uniform Database, for giving billsportsmaps.com the permission to use football uniforms illustrations from Gridiron Uniform Database {GUD}.

October 4, 2018

2018-19 Football League Two (4th division England, incl Wales): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division./+ 2 promoted clubs for the 2018-19 4th division (Macclesfield Town, Tranmere Rovers).

2018-19_football-league-two_map_w-2018-crowds_titles_seasons-in-1st-division_post_b_.gif"
2018-19 Football League Two (4th division England, incl Wales): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division



By Bill Turianski on 4 October 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2018-19 EFL League Two (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats…LEAGUE TWO [Summary] (soccerway.com).
-Sky Bet League Two 2018 – 2019 [kits] (historicalkits.co.uk).


A brief re-cap of 2017-18 League Two [the 4th division]…
Promoted to the 3rd division…Accrington Stanley, Luton Town, Wycombe Wanderers, Coventry City {see this post: http://billsportsmaps.com/?p=45230}.
Relegated from the 3rd division down to the 4th division are…Oldham Athletic, Northampton Town, Milton Keynes, Bury.
Relegated from the 4th division down to the non-League 5th division are…Barnet, Chesterfield.
Promoted up from the 5th division [non-League], and into the 4th division are the two clubs profiled below…

    Below: the 2 promoted clubs for the 2017-18 fourth division (Macclesfield Town, Tranmere Rovers)…
    •Macclesfield Town FC.

Est. 1876 (as Macclesfield FC). Nickname: the Silkmen. Colours: Blue-and-White. Location: Macclesfield, Cheshire. Population of Macclesfield: around 52,000 {2011 figure}. Macclesfield is situated (by road) 21 miles (30 km) S of Manchester. Macclesfield is situated (by road) 181 miles (290 km) NW of London.

Manager of Macclesfield Town, Mark Yates (age 48; b. Birmingham, West Midlands). Yates, the former Kidderminster, Cheltenham, Crawley, and Solihull manager, was hired by Macclesfield in June 2018. He replaced longtime former Macclesfield player and manager John Askey {see photos and captions below}. Askey had just unexpectadly guided Macclesfield back into the Football League, so his stock was up. And he took the opportunity to take on the manager’s role at a larger club, so he signed on with 3rd-division-side Shrewsbury Town. Askey replaced Paul Hurst at Shrewsbury (Hurst is now manager of 2nd-tier side Ipswich Town). As John Brewin tweeted earlier this week…‘Summer EFL managerial moves: Paul Hurst from Shrewsbury to Ipswich, John Askey from Macclesfield to Shrewsbury, Mark Yates to Macclesfield. The three clubs have one win between them all season.’ {twitter.com/JohnBrewin_/status/1047384525179895808.}

A key player in Macclesfield Town’s unlikely 5th division title was 37-year-old MF Danny Whitaker, who was born only a few miles from Macclesfield, in Wimslow, Cheshire {see photos and captions below}. Whitaker was one of three Macclesfield players who made the 2018 National League Team of the Year. The other two were the Kurdish Iraqi-born-/-Hastings-E Sussex-raised GK Shwan Jalal (age 35), and Shrewsbury-born MF/RW Elliott Durrell {Silkmen Trio In National League Team Of The Year (starlaneend.com)}. Jalal has moved on, remaining in the 5th division, now as GK for the just-relegated Chesterfield. Durrell and Whitaker are still with Macclesfield, and Whitaker has scored twice this season, but Durrell has not been playing and is battling a groin injury.

As of the 4th of October, Macclesfield Town, now under Mark Yates, have had a tough time of it back in the 4th division, and are currently without a win, and are at the foot of the table. Although in Macclesfield’s last two matches, they drew against two teams that are currently in the play-off places (1-1 v Forest Green Rovers, and 3-3 away v Newport County). Macclesfield are drawing 2.1 K (22nd-highest in the 4th tier; Crawley Town and Morecambe are drawing lower).

Below: Macclesfield Town makes a surprise return to the Football League, after a 6-season spell in non-League…
macclesfield-town_promoted-2018_moss-rose_john-askey_scott-wilson_tyrone-marsh_mitch-hancox_danny-whitaker_shwan-jalal_elliott-durrell_t_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Macclesfield 17/18 jersey, photo from umbro.co.uk/macclesfield-town. Macclesfield Borough coat of arms, photo by Bernt Rostad at File:Macclesfield Borough coat of arms.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org). Macclesfield town centre, photo by Daniel Case at File:View of Macclesfield from Macclesfield train station 2014.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org). Aerial image of Moss Rose, from bing.com/maps [Bird's Eye View]. Main Stand at Moss Rose, photo by John Campion at allroadsleadsomewhere.blogspot.com. John Askey as manager of Macclesfield [photo from 2014], photo by Dave Thompson/PA Images via gettyimages.com. John Askey as a player for Macclesfield [photo circa 2001], photo unattributed at thenonleaguefootballpaper.com. Shwan Jalal, photo by Chelsie Wilson via starlaneend.com. Elliott Durrell, photo by Chelsie Wilson via starlaneend.com. Danny Whitaker, photo from mtfc.co.uk. Scott Wilson, photo from Macclesfield Town at twitter.com/@thesilkmen [27 Oct 2017]. Some of the 494 traveling Macclesfield fans celebrate, after Tyrone Marsh scores v Eastleigh, photo by Warren Little/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. 17/18 Macclesfield Town away jersey, photo from mtfcdirect.co.uk. Tyrone Marsh celebrates goal v Eastleigh, photo by Warren Little/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Mitch Hancox scores 2nd goal v Eastleigh, photo by Action Images via thes*n.co.uk. Danny Whittaker is carried off the field by Macclesfield fans after the promotion-clinching win, photo by Warren Little/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com.

    •Tranmere Rovers FC.

Est. 1884 (as Belmont FC). Nicknames: Super White Army; Rovers. Colours: White with Blue trim. Location: Tranmere, Birkenhead, Wirral Peninsula, Merseyside [along the west bank of the River Mersey, opposite the city of Liverpool]. Population of Birkenhead: around 88,000 {2011 figure}. Birkenhead is situated (by road) 2 miles (3 km) W of Liverpool. Birkenhead is situated (by road) 219 miles (352 km) NW of London.

Manager of Tranmere Rovers, Micky Mellon (age 46; b. Paisley, Scotland). Micky Mellon was a DMF  who made 173 league appearances for Tranmere Rovers (1997-99; 2001-04); Mellon also made 125 appearances for Blackpool, and 85 appearances for Burnley. After retiring from the playing field in 2006, Mellon got into coaching: first with Northern League side Lancaster City, then with Burnley as an assistant. Then in 2009, Mellon became the coastal Lancashire-based Fleetwood Town’s first full-time manager. Fleetwood, now a 3rd division side, were back then a well-funded 6th-tier-team that was on the rise. Mellon led Fleetwood to promotion to the Conference [the 5th division], by winning the 2010 Conference North play-off final over Alfreton Town. Two seasons later, in 2011-12, Mellon led Fleetwood to promotion again, by winning the Conference title (beating out 2nd-place Wrexham by 5 points), thus sending Fleetwood Town up to the Football League for the first time. But a bad run of form half a year later, in December 2012, saw Mellon sacked. Mellon was then caretaker manager of then-2nd-division-side Barnsley, from Nov 2013 to March 2014.

After that, Micky Mellon was hired by then-4th-division-side (and just-relegated) Shrewsbury Town, in May 2014. Mellon led Shrewsbury to an immediate return to the 3rd tier, by winning the 2014-15 League Two title. But, a year-and-a-half later, a run of  just 2 wins in the first 11 matches of the 2016-17 season led to Mellon’s dismissal from Shrewsbury, on 6 October 2016. That same day, Mellon, as manager, returned to the club he had played for the longest – Tranmere Rovers.

Tranmere Rovers were a longtime Football League club (with a 86-consecutive-season stint in the League). But the Merseyside-based club had fallen into the bottleneck that is the non-League Wilderness the previous season, and had become the highest-drawing club in non-League football (drawing 5.1 K). That Tranmere were a rather large club to be stuck in non-League was shown by the fact that, despite their diminished standing, the Rovers were still drawing better than over two-dozen Football League clubs {source: european-football-statistics.co.uk/attn}. Mellon almost got Tranmere back to the League in 2016-17, finishing in 2nd place, 4 points behind Lincoln City, but then lost in the 2017 National League play-off final to Forest Green Rovers, 3-1.

In 2017-18, Tranmere Rovers again finished in 2nd place in the 5th division, this time ending up 10 points behind the surprise team of the season, Macclesfield Town. But the second time around, Mellon’s Tranmere navigated the tricky 5th tier play-offs successfully. Tranmere beat Ebbsfleet 4-2 (aet) in the semifinals, then beat Boreham Wood 2-1 in the 2018 National League play-off final, despite being a man down for 89 minutes; the winning goal was scored by James Norwood in the 81st minute, on a header from a deftly chipped cross from substitute AMF Connor Jennings {see illustration below}.

So once again, Mickey Mellon got a team promoted. That makes 4 teams that Mellon has gotten promoted as manager. The English record for most teams led to promotion as a manager is 8, by Cardiff City’s Neil Warnock {see this post [2018-19 Premier League map/post], in the Cardiff section there}.

The 4 teams that manager Mickey Mellon has led to promotion:
Fleetwood Town promoted to the 5th Div (2010).
Fleetwood Town promoted to the 4th Div (2012).
Shrewsbury Town promoted to the 3rd Div (2015).
Tranmere Rovers promoted to the 4th Div (2018).

Two Tranmere Rovers players made the 2018 National League Team of the Year: the Liverpool-born 35-year-old DF Steve McNulty [captain], and FW Andy Cook (age 28) {see photos and captions below}. Andy Cook scored 27 for Tranmere last season, and the County Durham-born Cook was top-scorer in the 5th division. Cook has moved on (to 3rd-tier side Walsall), but the solid rock that is Steve McNulty remains, as does crowd-favourite James Norwood (who netted 23 last season, including that promotion-winner at Wembley). This is the 4th team that Steve McNulty has played on which has won promotion (McNulty has won promotion with Barrow in 2008 as captain; with Fleetwood Town in 2010 as captain; with Luton Town in 2014; and now with Tranmere Rovers in 2018 as captain).

Tranmere Rovers’ return to the 4th division has gone well so far.…as of 4th October they sit 10th and, on Tuesday the 2nd of October, Tranmere beat League Two leaders Lincoln City 1-0, on a goal by current league top scorer James Norwood (with 8 goals). Tranmere Rovers are drawing 6.0 K so far this season, which is 5th-highest in the 4th division. (Lincoln City are drawing best in League two, at 8.6 K {source: us.soccerway.com/national/england/league-two/20182019}.)

-The story of Tranmere Rovers: How one club survive and prosper in the shadow of such powerful neighbours (by Simon Hughes at independent.co.uk/sport/football).

Below: Tranmere Rovers return to the Football League after a 3-season spell in non-League…
tranmere-rovers_promoted-2018_2018-national-league-playoff-final_prenton-park_mickey-mellon_andy-cook_steve-mcnulty_james-norwood_n_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Tranmere jersey, from trfcshop.co.uk. Aerial shot of Prenton Park, photo from liverpoolecho.co.uk/football . Steve NcNulty, photo unattributed at roversrearguard.com. Andy Cook, photo unattributed at leaderlive.co.uk/sport. Tranmere supporters with informative banner, outside Wembley [2018 National League playoff Final], photo by Lorna Hughes at twitter.com/@lorna-hughes via liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport/tranmere-rovers-v-boreham-wood. Liam Ridehalge tackle/red card (1′), screenshot from Captura/BT Sport via besoccer.com; photo by Richard Ault/talru.com via roversrearguard.com. Andy Cook scores (6′), photo by PA via sport.net. Andy Cook celebrates his goal, screenshot from video uploaded by Tranmere Fan TV at youtube.com. (45+8′), Bruno Andrade’s goal evens the score, photo by PA via dailymail.co.uk. (81′), James Norwood scores on a far-post header from a chipped cross by substitute AMF Connor Jennings, screenshot from video uploaded by Official Tranmere Rovers at youtube.com. Norwood’s goal, photo unattributed at sport.bt.com. James Norwood, photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Tranmere players celebrate winning goal with fans, screenshot from video uploaded by Official Tranmere Rovers at youtube.com. Mickey Mellon celebrating right after final whistle, photo from twitter.com/[@TranmereRovers].

___
Thanks to the following…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.

-Attendances from E-F-S site, european-football-statistics.co.uk/attn.htm.
-5th division attendances from us.soccerway.com.
-Thanks to the contributors at en.wikipedia, at 2018-19 EFL League Two.

September 24, 2018

American Football League: 1960 AFL season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Houston Oilers. /+ Chart of Average Attendance, NFL vs. AFL (the 10 years they were in competition: 1960-69), including NFL/AFL/Super Bowl title-winners in the 1960s.

afl_1960_1st-season_map_w-final-standings_o-stats-leaders_champions-houston-oilers_post_m_.gif
American Football League: 1960 AFL season, map with helmets/jerseys and final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Houston Oilers




By Bill Turianski on 24 September 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1960 AFL season
-1960 AFL Championship Game (en.wikipedia.org).
-1960 AFL season (pro-football-reference.com).

The map… The map shows the 8 teams in the inaugural season of the American Football League (IV) (1960). At the lower-right of the map-page are the final standings of the 1960 AFL, along with home jerseys and helmets of the 8 AFL teams of 1960. At the bottom-right corner are the attendance figures for the 1960 AFL. The map lists all 8 original venues of the 8 charter members of the AFL, and it shows every location that the 8 original AFL teams have played in (1960-69 in AFL, 1970-2018 in NFL). At the upper-right of the map-page are standout players for the champions, the 1960 Houston Oilers. Below that are 1960 AFL offensive leaders in the following categories: Passing Yardage, Frank Tripucka, Denver Broncos. QB Rating, Tom Flores, Oakland Raiders. TD Passes, Al Dorow, New York Titans. Rushing Yardage and Yards from Scrimmage, Abner Haynes, Dallas Texans. Receiving Yards, Bill Groman, Houston Oilers. Total TDs, Art Powell, New York Titans.

The AFL versus the NFL…
In the late 1950s, just as the NFL was becoming a vastly popular sporting entertainment to millions of Americans, here is what the 12-team NFL thought about expansion, as represented by a quote from the Washington owner George Preston Marshall: “There is no excuse for expansion in the National Football League. We furnish football now, for free, through television. Expansion can only weaken the personnel.” The AFL proved this to be a fallacy. Principal founder of the AFL Lamar Hunt, co-founder Bud Adams, the other AFL owners, and all the players who played in the AFL, would prove that there was plenty of room for more pro football teams in America.

In 1960, the AFL started with 8 teams, and the eight ownership groups were dubbed “the Foolish Club”.
To a man, the NFL front office, as well as the front offices of all the 12 established NFL teams, were quite sure the AFL would soon be a bust. But by the mid-1960s, the NFL had realized that the AFL was for real. By the close of the 1965 season, the American Football League, after 6 seasons, had basically become a significant rival to the NFL. The AFL had increased its attendance remarkably. The AFL went from averaging 16 K per game in their first season in 1960, to averaging 31 K per game five years later in 1965. The AFL’s television contract with NBC, and the several major stadiums being built for AFL teams, were indications that in the late 1965/early 1966 time period, the AFL was starting to look like it was a success, a success that could only threaten the NFL. And the AFL was planning on expansion [the Miami Dolphins joined the AFL in 1966 and the Cincinnati Bengals became the 10th AFL team in 1968].

The AFL had a ten-year battle with the NFL that saw the AFL gradually gain more popularity, as the decade of the 1960s wore on. The first indication that the new AFL might be able to challenge the NFL was when the Houston Oilers signed 1959 Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon [of LSU], despite the fact that the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams had signed Cannon two months earlier (the Oilers owner Bud Adams had offered Cannon $3,000 more per season plus a Cadillac). In June 1960, the Oilers’ record-breaking $110,000 contract with Cannon was upheld in court, and the AFL had poached the biggest prospect from out of the hands of the NFL. (The speedy Cannon went on to be the MVP of the 1960 AFL Championship Game {see illustration at the end of this post}.)

A major way in which the AFL was able grab the attention of sports fans was its style of play.
While the NFL of this era centered on the stodgy running game, the AFL was based on the decidedly more exciting passing game, throwing downfield play after play. Visionary head coach Sid Gillman of the Chargers introduced the vertical offense, stretching the football field by throwing deep downfield passes, instead of short passes. Gillman and his proteges were instrumental in making football into the modern game that it is today. But it wasn’t just the Chargers that were emphasizing the passing game in the new AFL: most teams there were doing it. And the league’s first champions, the Houston Oilers, under head coach Lou Rymkus, won titles with an aggressive passing game.

Rejected NFL QB George Blanda came out of retirement to join the Houston Oilers as a 33-year-old.
Blanda had been QB/K for the Chicago Bears from 1950-58, but he retired when he learned that George Halas intended to demote him to only placekicking duties. So when the AFL got started up, Blanda realized he could get another shot as a starting QB. And so, in 1960 and ’61, Blanda led the Houston Oilers to the first two AFL titles, setting a TD passing record that stood for 23 years. Blanda threw 36 TD passes in 1961. (That record was matched by YA Tittle of the NFL’s New York Giants two years later in 1963, and was not beaten until the NFL added 2 games to the season, and was first surpassed by Dan Marino in 1984; and is now held by Tom Brady with 50 TD passes.) One of Blanda’s main targets as he led the Oilers to those two consecutive AFL titles was Charlie Hennigan. Hennigan was a WR who had played for a small college in Louisiana (Northwestern State), and he had never gotten a chance in the NFL. He was working as a high school football coach and Biology teacher before the AFL came along. In 1961, Hennigan had 12 TD Receptions and his 1,746 yards receiving that season was a pro football record that stood for 34 years.

So much for the idea that more pro football teams circa 1960 would result in a weaker on-field product. Here were two guys – Blanda and Hennigan – who were shut out of the NFL, but who went on to glory in the new AFL, setting records that stood for decades. And again, with the record Blanda set in 1961 (as a 34-year-old), we’re talking about a record set for TD passes, one of the most exciting plays in pro sports. Here was the AFL in a nutshell: more chances for the players, and more excitement for the fans.

Average Attendance, NFL vs. AFL (the 10 years they were in competition: 1960-69); plus NFL/AFL/Super Bowl title-winners in the 1960s…
afl_vs_nfl_attendance_1960-69_title-winners_super-bowl_i-iv_winners_chart_e_.gif
Source for attendance figures: pdf at ProFootballResearchers.org [Coffin Corner newsletter, Sept 1991, by Bob Carroll], profootballresearchers.org/archives/Website_Files/Coffin_Corner/13-04-430.pdf. Helmet illustrations from gridiron-uniforms.com.

And so in the summer of 1966, the NFL headed off the threat of a mutually destructive competition between the two leagues, and negotiated a merger with the AFL. This merger created the Super Bowl in the 1967 season, setting the stage for a full AFL/NFL merger in 1970.

In 1959 there were 12 NFL teams, and absolutely no plans for expansion, despite its ever-growing popularity. And, it must be added, despite the fact that there were a whole host of cities shut out of the NFL and clamoring for expansion teams. In 1970, thanks to the success of the AFL, there were 26 NFL teams…and more to come.

In a ten-year-span, the AFL cut the crowd-size difference between the two leagues by almost ten thousand per game (9.8 K). By 1969, 7 of the 10 AFL teams were drawing over 40-K-per-game (NY Jets at 63 K, Oakland Raiders at 53 K, Kansas City Chiefs at 49 K, Denver Broncos at 46 K, San Diego Chargers at 46 K, Houston Oilers at 44 K, Buffalo Bills at 40 K). The AFL went from drawing a quasi-bush league 16.5-K-per-game in their first season, to drawing a very respectable 40.6-K-per-game in their final season of 1969. That was an increase of over 24,000 per game.
(Source: THE AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE ATTENDANCE, 1960-69 [pdf].)

And crucially, by the 1968 and 1969 seasons, the AFL became legitimate where it mattered the most…on the field.
In the end, the AFL proved to be the equal of the NFL by the very fact that the last two match-ups between an AFL team and an NFL team ended with the AFL team being the victor. In the 1968 season, the AFL’s New York Jets shocked the sporting world by beating the favored Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III. And in the 1969 season, the AFL’s Kansas City Chiefs upended the favored Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV.

So in 1970, all 10 teams of the AFL joined the NFL.
This is the only time in the 140-plus-year history of major league sports in the United States and Canada that a competing pro league was fully absorbed into the established pro league, on an equal basis, with no strings attached. Every other such major-leagues-merger was done piecemeal, where the established league got to pick and choose from the rival-league’s roster of teams, and then dictate the terms. Such as with the 8 American Association teams that joined the National League between 1887 to 1892. And such as with the 3 AAFC teams that joined the NFL in 1950. And as with the 4 ABA teams that joined the NBA in 1976. And as with the 4 WHA teams that joined the NHL in 1979. The NFL, circa the late 1950s, had bolted the door on cities like Houston and Boston and Denver and Buffalo and Oakland (and San Diego and Kansas City and Miami). But a decade later, they had to let the whole lot of them in.

57 minute video: Rebels with a Cause: the Story of the American Football League (video uploaded by FWP Film Network at youtube.com).

1960: original AFL teams from the Northeast (Boston Patriots, New York Titans, Buffalo Bills). [Boston Patriots changed name to New England Patriots in 1971; New York Titans changed name to New York Jets in 1963]. Shown on the map-segment below are all the venue-locations of the Patriots franchise, the Bills franchise, and the Titans/Jets franchise (1960-2018).
Original helmets, and primary logos, shown. With all locations the teams have played in (1960-2018).
afl-1960_boston-patriots_ny-titans_buffalo-bills_map_northeastern-usa_c_.gif

1960: original AFL teams from the Southwest (Houston Oilers, Dallas Texans [II]) [Houston Oilers (1960-96) moved to Memphis, TN (1997), and then to Nashville, TN (1998) and became the Tennessee Titans (1999); Dallas Texans (1960-62) moved to Kansas City, MO in 1963, and became the Kansas City Chiefs.].
Original helmets, and primary logos, shown. Shown on the map-segment below are all the venue-locations of the Texans/Chiefs franchise, and the Oilers/Titans franchise (1960-2018).
afl-1960_houston-oilers_dallas-texans_map_southwest-usa_c_.gif

1960: original AFL team from the Mountain West (Denver Broncos).
Original helmet, and primary logo, shown.
afl-1960_denver-broncos_map_mountain-west-usa_c_.gif

1960: original AFL teams from the West Coast (Los Angeles Chargers, Oakland Raiders) [Los Angeles Chargers (1960) moved to San Diego in 1961 (San Diego Chargers 1961-2016), and then moved back to Los Angeles in 2016; Oakland Raiders moved to Los Angeles in 1982 (Los Angeles Raiders 1982-94), and then moved back to Oakland in 1995]. Original helmets, and primary logos, shown. Shown on the map-segment below are all the venue-locations of the Chargers franchise, and the Raiders franchise (1960-2018).
afl-1960_los-angeles-chargers_oakland-raiders_map_west-coast-usa_d_.gif

    Houston Oilers, the 1960 AFL champions…

houston-oilers_1960_afl-champions_jeppesen-stadium_oilers-24_chargers-16_george-blanda_billy-cannon_k_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Chargers and Oilers 1960 helmets/jerseys by gridiron-uniforms.com/[1960 AFL title game]. George Blanda (close-up shot) screenshot from Full Color Football #1 uploaded by TheAFLHistory at youtube.com. George Blanda takes a snap in 1960 AFL title game, photo unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com/2010/01/1961-oilers-defeat-chargers-for-first-[afl-title-game]. Billy Cannon, photo unattributed at fanbase.com. Blanda to Cannon for 88-yrad-TD, 3 screenshots from Full Color Football #1 uploaded by TheAFLHistory at youtube.com. Oilers 1960 uniform, illustration by Gridiron Uniforms Database: gridiron-uniforms.com/[Seasons/1960/AFL/Oilers]. Shot from Oiler 1961 training camp, photo by NFL/Getty Images via smithsonianmag.com/history/the-american-football-leagues-foolish-club.

___
Houston Oilers, on map page
Screenshot of AFL founders, Hunt and Adams, from video uploaded by Rusty Brewer at youtube.com.
Oilers players on bench [photo circa 1961], screenshot from Full Color Football #1 uploaded by TheAFLHistory at youtube.com. Reproduction of 1960-61 Houston Oilers helmet, photo from supersportscenter.com. George Blanda [image from 1962], screenshot from Full Color Football #1 uploaded by TheAFLHistory at youtube.com. George Blanda [photo circa 1961], photo unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com. Billy Cannon [circa 1960 photo, later colorized by John Turney], unattributed at pinterest.com but originally from nflfootballjournal.blogspot.com. Billy Cannon and Rich Michael [photo circa 1961], photo unattributed at profootballhof.com. Dave Smith [photo from 1961], photo by Hy Peskin/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Al Jamison [1961 Fleer trading card], unattributed at pinterest.com. Mark Johnston [photo from 1960], photo by Neil Leifer/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Bill Groman [1961 Fleer card], from amazon.com.


Offensive stats leaders on map page,
Frank Tripucka, [1961 Fleer trading card], from tradingcarddb.com. Tom Flores [1961 Fleer trading card], from footballcardgallery.com. Al Dorow [photo from 1st Titans game v Buffalo at Polo Grounds], photo by Ernie Sisto/New York Times at nytimes.com. Abner Haynes, [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Bill Groman [photo from 1960 AFL title game (on Jan. 1 1961)], photo by Darryl Norenberg via espn.com. Art Powell [photo from 1960 versus Oilers at Polo Ground], photo by Neil Leifer/Getty Images via gettyimages.com.

Thanks to,
-Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Sportslogos.net for 1960-era AFL team logos. -Thanks to Buffalo Bills official site for original Bills logo (1960-61). -Thanks to Infinite Jets blog for hard-to-find full-color NY Titans logo.
-Thanks to the Pro Football Researchers.org, via their Coffin Corner newsletter, for this THE AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE ATTENDANCE, 1960-69 [pdf].
-pro-football-reference.com.
-Thanks to the contributors at AFL 1960 season (en.wikipedia.org).
Special thanks to Tim Brulia, Bill Schaefer and Rob Holecko of The Gridiron Uniform Database, for giving billsportsmaps.com the permission to use football uniforms illustrations from Gridiron Uniform Database {GUD}.

September 14, 2018

2018-19 Football League One (3rd division England): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division./+ 4 promoted clubs for the 2018-19 3rd division (Accrington Stanley, Luton Town, Wycombe Wanderers, Coventry City).

2018-19_football-league-one_map_w-2018-crowds_titles_seasons-in-1st-division_post_b_.gif
2018-19 Football League One (3rd division England): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division



By Bill Turianski on 14 September 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2018-19 EFL League One (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats…LEAGUE ONE [Summary] (soccerway.com).
-Sky Bet League One 2018 – 2019 [kits] (historicalkits.co.uk).

A brief re-cap of 2017-18 League One [the 3rd division]…
Promoted to the 2nd division…Wigan Athletic, Blackburn Rovers, Rotherham United {see this post: billsportsmaps.com/?p=45287}.
Relegated from the 2nd division down to the 3rd division are…Barnsley, Burton Albion, Sunderland.
Relegated from the 3rd division down to the 4th division are…Oldham Athletic, Northampton Town, Milton Keynes, Bury.
Promoted up from the 4th division and into the 3rd division are the four clubs profiled below…

    Below: the 4 promoted clubs for the 2017-18 3rd division (Accrington Stanley, Luton Town, Wycombe Wanderers, Coventry City).

•Accrington Stanley FC.
Est. 1968. Nicknames: Accie; Stanley. Colours: Red shirts, Red pants, Red socks. Location: Accrington is in Lancashire, located right between Blackburn and Burnley: Accrington is (by road) 6 mi/10 km E of Blackburn and Accrington is 6 mi/10 km W of Burnley. Accrington is situated (by road) 23 miles (37 km) N of Manchester city centre; and Accrington is situated (by road) 231 miles (378 km) NW of London. Population of Accrington: around 35,000 {2011 census}.
Manager of Accrington Stanley: John Coleman (age 55; born in Liverpool). John Coleman was 2018 League Two Manager of the Year.

-From Guardian/football, Accrington Stanley: how the ‘starving peasants’ rocked the natural order (by Niall McVeigh on 18 April 2018 at theguardian.com/football).

Accrington Stanley drew 1,699 per game two seasons ago [2016-17], which was lowest in the Football League (Morecambe drew 5-per-game higher). And Accrington were drawing only 1,663 per game midway through last season [2017-18] (after 11 home matches). But, as the 2017-18 season progressed, and Accrington’s promotion run started to look like the real thing, home crowds grew bigger. Stanley drew 2.3 K in a 3-1 win over FGR on the 17th of March; then Stanley drew 3.0 K in a 1-0 win over Notts County on the 2nd of April [a Monday night match]. Then Stanley drew 3.1 K for the next two home games: a 1-1 draw with Exeter City on Saturday the 14th of April, then a 2-0 win over Yeovil Town four days later [on Tuesday the 17th of April]. That win over Yeovil clinched automatic promotion for Accrington Stanley. For 2017-18 Accrington Stanley ended up averaging 1,979, which was 180 more per game than the previous season of 2016-17. Using last season’s figures Accrington Stanley will be the smallest-drawing club in the 3rd division in 2018-19, by a margin of about 1,100 (Fleetwood Town is the second-lowest drawing club that is in the 3rd tier in 2018-19). As for life in the 3rd tier now, after 8 matches, Accrington are drawing 2.2 K (which is about 5.5 K less than the league average). And Stanley are holding their own, as a solidly upper-mid-table side with, believe it or not, aspirations for a second-straight promotion-run.

2018: Football League minnows Accrington Stanley win their first-ever promotion to the 3rd division…
accrington-stanley_promoted2018_wham-stadium_john-coleman_billy-kee_kayden-jackson_sean-mcconville_h_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Accrington 17/18 home jersey, from plasticboxshop.co.uk. Rooftop-view of Accrington in Lancashire, photo unattributed at visitlancashire.com/explore/accrington. Aerial shot of the Crown Ground (aka Wham Stadium), photo unattributed at stevenagefc.com. Sign at edge of pitch at the Crown Ground: “This Is Stanley – The Club That Wouldn’t Die”, photo by D&M Williams at mapio.net. Accrington supporters at match in mid-March 2018, photo by Accrington Observer at accringtonobserver.co.uk/news/something-special-stirring-down-accrington.Traveling Stanley supporters celebrate goal/John Coleman thanking supporters/Billy Kee congratulated by Jordan Clark after scoring winning goal, 3 photos from 7th of April match at Colchester, photos by KIPAX via thisislancashire.co.uk/[Gallery: Colchester 0-1 Accrington Stanley]. Kayden Jackson, photo unattributed at lancashiretelegraph.co.uk. Sean McConville, photo unattributed at efl.com. Accrington Stanley fans celebrate promotion to League One (benign pitch invasion), photo by Paul Greenwood/BPI/REX/Shutterstock via theguardian.com/football.

•Luton Town FC.
Est. 1885. Nickname: the Hatters. Colours: Orange shirts, Navy-Blue pants. Location: Luton, Bedfordshire. Luton Town FC. Est. 1885. Nickname: the Hatters. Population: town-population of Luton: around 216,000 {2011 figure}; Luton is situated (by road) 34 miles (55 km) N of Central London.
Manager of Luton Town: Nathan Jones (age 45; born in Ystrad Rhondda, South Wales).

2018: Luton Town returns to the 3rd division after an eleven-year absence (which included a 5-year spell in non-League)…
luton-town_promoted-2018_kenilworth-road_nathan-jones_dan-potts_alan-sheehan_jack-stacey_luke-berry_danny-hylton_james-collins_k_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
17/18 Luton Town jersey, photo from lutontown.co.uk/shop. Aerial shot of Kenilworth Road [view from the South], photo by David Goddard at gettyimages.co.uk. 3 17/18 kits of Luton Town [illustration], by historicalkits.co.uk/2017-2018/league-two. Aerial shot of Kenilworth Road [view from the East], photo by pictionair.co.uk. Interior shot of Kenilworth Road, photo by ProSportsImages.co.uk via the72.co.uk. Jack Stacey, photo from lutontown.co.uk. Alan Sheehan, photo unattributed at lutontoday.co.uk/football. Dan Potts, photo unattributed at lutontoday.co.uk/football. Luke Berry, photo unattributed at twitter.com/@LutonTown. Danny Hylton, photo by Michael Zemanek/BPI via dailymail.co.uk/football. James Collins, photo by PPA-UK/Rex/Shutterstock via dailymail.co.uk/football. Nathan Jones, photo from lutontown.co.uk.

•Wycombe Wanderers FC.
Est. 1887. Nickname: the Chairboys. Colours: Quartered shirts of Navy-Blue (Oxford Blue) and Pale-Blue (Cambridge Blue). Location: High Wycombe [aka Wycombe], in Buckinghamshire. Wycombe is situated (by road) 27 miles (44 km) SE of Oxford. Wycombe is situated (by road) 33 miles (53 km) NW of London. Population of High Wycombe: around 125,000 {2011 census}.
Manager: Gareth Ainsworth (age 45; born in Blackburn, Lancashire).

2018: Wycombe Wanderers win promotion back to the 3rd division (after a 6-year spell in the 4th division)…
wycombe-wanderers_promoted-2018_adams-park_gareth-ainsworth_adebayo-akinfenwa_adam-el-abd_i_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
17/18 WWFC jersey, from oneills.com/wycombe-wanderers. Stained-glass window at High Wycombe Guildhall, marking the end of the First World War [made circa 1919], photo by Thorskegga Thorn at flickr.com. 3 Wycombe Wanderers chained-goose crests (1930s, 1990s, 1999) from historicalkits.co.uk/Wycombe_Wanderers. Exterior shot of Adams Park, by DipsyDave at File:Adams Park from a northerly direction.JPG (commons.wikimedia.org). Interior shots of Adams Park, 2 photos (North [main] Stand and South Stand), by StHelena at stadiumdb.com/[Adams Park]; (StHelena at flickr.com). Adam El-Abd , photo unattributed at bucksfreepress.co.uk. Adebayo Akinfenwa, photo unattributed at liverpoolecho.co.uk/football. Wycombe players and manager Ainsworth & traveling fans celebrate promotion [28th April 2018 at Chesterfield], 2 photos by Barry Coombs/PA Images/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Wycombe orange/charcoal-gray badge, from oniells.com.

•Coventry City FC.
Est. 1883. Nickname: the Sky Blues. Colours: Pale-Blue jerseys, White pants. Location: Coventry, West Midlands. Coventry is situated (by road) 21 miles (34 km) E of Birmngham; Coventry is situated (by road) 25 miles (40 km) SW of Leicester. Coventry is situated (by road) 108 miles (174 km) NW of central London. Coventry has a city-&-borough population of around 360,000 {2017 estimate}. Coventry is the 20th-largest built-up area in the UK {source: List of urban areas in the United Kingdom}. Coventry is close to the geographic centre of England.
Manager: Mark Robins (48; born in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire [which is now situated in Greater Manchester]).

Below: 2018: Coventry City bounces straight back up to the 3rd division (via a play-off win at Wembley over Exter City)…
coventry-city_promoted-2018_ricoh-arena_mark-robins_lee-burge_jordan-willis_jordan-shipley_jack-grimmer_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – CCFC 17/18 jersey from ccfc.co.uk. Coventry city centre, photo by E Gammie at geograph.org.uk. Aerial shot of Ricoh Arena unattributed at psam.uk.com. Lee Burge, photo unattributed at coventrytelegraph.net. Jordan Willis, photo unattributed at skysports.com. Jordan Willis curls in a goal; 1-0 Coventry (49′), photograph by Andrew Couldridge/Action Images via theguardian.com/football/live. Jordan Shipley after putting Coventry City up 2-0 (54′), photo by Birmingham Mail via coventrytelegraph.net/sport. DF Jack Grimmer’s goal makes it 3-0 (68′), screenshot from video uploaded by Coventry City FC at youtube.com. Grimmer & teammates celebrate, photo from ccfc.co.uk/news. Manager Mark Robins lifts trophy, photo from ccfc.co.uk/news.
___
Thanks to all at the following…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Attendances from E-F-S site, european-football-statistics.co.uk/attn.htm.
-England – First Level All-Time Tables 1888/89-2015/16 (rsssf.com).
-Thanks to the contributors at en.wikipedia, at EFL League One (en.wikipedia.org).

September 2, 2018

NFL 1960 season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Philadelphia Eagles.

Filed under: NFL>1960 map/season,NFL/ Gridiron Football,Retro maps — admin @ 5:22 pm

nfl_1960_map-with-helmets_1960-standings_offensive-stats-leaders_home-jerseys_philadelphia-eagles-champs_post_k_.gif
NFL 1960 season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: Philadelphia Eagles




By Bill Turianski on 2 September 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-1960 NFL season
-1960 NFL Championship Game (en.wikipedia.org).
-1960 NFL season (pro-football-reference.com).
-1960 NFL teams’ uniforms (gridiron-uniforms.com).

1960: the NFL is in competition with a new rival league, the American Football League [AFL (IV/1960-69).] (The AFL later merged with the NFL in the 1966-to-1970 time period. The two leagues began playing a championship game starting in 1966 [later named the Super Bowl]; the two leagues’ conferences and schedules were combined in 1970.)

(Note: I will post a map of the American Football League 1960 season, in late September 2018.)

1960 was the NFL’s 41st season. The NFL had 10 teams through most of the 1940s. By the end of 1949, when the NFL’s 4-year battle with rival-league the AAFC ended, 3 of the AAFC franchises joined the NFL…Cleveland Browns, San Francisco 49ers, Baltimore Colts (I). So in 1950 the NFL went from 10 teams to 13 teams. But one of those 3 new teams from the AAFC immediately went defunct [Baltimore Colts I/1950 (1-11)/defunct]. So from 1951 to 1959 (9 seasons), the NFL had 12 teams.

In 1960, the NFL finally expanded past the 12-team size for good, when the Dallas Cowboys joined the league. Which made the NFL of 1960 an unwieldy 13-team league, but for only one season. Because plans were already in the works to add another new franchise, the Minnesota Vikings, for the next season, in 1961. And then two more teams would join the NFL later in the 1960s (to make it a 16-team league): Atlanta in 1966, and New Orleans in 1967.

The map… The map shows the primary helmets and jerseys worn by the 13 NFL teams of 1960 (including the expansion team, the Dallas Cowboys; and including the franchise shift of the NFL Cardinals from Chicago to St. Louis) {also see illustrations further below in the 1960 NFL uniforms section}. Final standings for the 1960 NFL season, along with team-colors worn that season, can be seen at the lower-right of the map. At the far lower-right are the home jerseys/helmets worn in 1960. At the top-right of the map page is a section devoted to the 1960 NFL champions, the Philadelphia Eagles (also see next 11 paragraphs below). At the far-right-hand-center of the map page, are 1960 Offensive leaders in the following categories: QB Rating: Milt Plum, Browns. Passing Yards and TD Passes: Johnny Unitas, Colts. Rushing Yards: Jim Brown, Browns. Yards from Scrimmage: John David Crow, Cardinals. Receiving Yards: Raymond Berry, Colts. Total TDs [tied]: Paul Hornung, Packers & Sonny Randle, Cardinals.

    The Philadelphia Eagles were champions in 1960, beating the Green Bay Packers 17-13.

The 1960 NFL Championship Game featured two teams that had won multiple championships in the past. The Packers had won 6 NFL titles at this point (1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, 1944). The Eagles had won 2 NFL titles at this point (1948 and ’49). But both teams had sunk into mediocrity through the 1950s, and both teams had sunk so low as to have been last-place-finishers two seasons earlier, in 1958.

The Packers were coached by second-year head coach Vince Lombardi, who at this point in time was a little-known former offensive coach of the New York Giants. When Lombardi arrived in Green Bay before the start of the 1959 season, the Packers had come off of their worst-ever record in ’58 (1-10-1); Lombardi turned the Packers in ’59 into a 7-5 team. And then the Packers won the West in 1960, with an 8-4 record, finishing one game ahead of the Lions and the 49ers.

The Eagles’ head coach was former San Francisco 49ers head coach Buck Shaw, who had totally re-built the Eagles in a 3-season-span, taking them from 2-9-1 in ’58, to 7-5 in ’59, to a league-best 10-2 in 1960. The Eagles clinched the East in 1960 in week 10 (with 2 games to spare). Buck Shaw was 61 years old, and would retire following the 1960 title game.

The Packers featured a group of players who would go on to further glory (and later induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame), but were relatively unknown at this time…QB Bart Starr, HB/K Paul Hornung, FB Jim Taylor, MLB Ray Nitschke. The Eagles featured 34-year-old QB/P Norm Van Brocklin, who had been part of the 1951 NFL-title-winning Los Angeles Rams, and who had the second-best passing numbers in 1960, behind only Johnny Unitas of the Colts. Van Brocklin had the option to call his own plays, and coach Shaw deferred to him with respect to strategy. Van Brocklin’s main target was the diminutive speedster Tommy McDonald (Flanker). The anchor of the Eagles was two-way player Chuck Bednarik, who was a starter at Center, and was also a much feared and hard-hitting Linebacker. Bednarik, who was 35 at the time, would, amazingly, end up playing 58 of the 60 minutes of the 1960 title game. (Van Brocklin, McDonald and Bednarik, as well as backup-QB sonny Jurgenen, would all later be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.)

Back then, the NFL rotated the title game between Eastern and Western champions’ venues. So the 1960 NFL Championship Game was slated to be hosted by the Eastern Conference champions, which meant that the Philadelphia Eagles would host the game at their venue, Franklin Field. Because Christmas fell on a Sunday that year, and because the league did not want to play the game on that big holiday, the game was scheduled for the 26th of December. Franklin Field, which was (and still is) owned by the University of Pennsylvania, had no lighting back then, so the game-time was moved forward to 12 noon, in order to avoid a twilight-gloom if the game went into overtime (as the 1958 NFL title game did). Game-time conditions were less than ideal: although it was a relatively mild 48 °F (9 °C), the field was a thawed frozen surface with scattered puddles, and it became muddy as the game wore on. The Packers, despite being the visiting team, and despite having a worse record than the Eagles, were a 2-to-3-point favorite. On hand was a crowd that numbered considerably more than the venue’s full-capacity (of 60,000)…portable bleachers, seating around 7,000, were installed around the stadium track, and the attendance was 67,325. But still, a local television blackout was enforced (why?), forcing many Eagles fans to drive to New Jersey or to Baltimore to watch the game.

1st Quarter: the Eagles give the ball up twice, deep in their end of the field, but escape with only a 3-point deficit…On the first play after the opening kick-off, Norm Van Brocklin’s deflected lateral was recovered by Packers DE Bill Quinlan, giving the Packers the ball on the Eagle 14. But the Eagles defense held firm: Lombardi went for it on 4th-and-2 from the 6 yard-line, and Chuck Bednarik smothered Packers RB Jim Taylor. The Eagles had the ball now, deep in their own end, but 3 plays later they turned it over again: a fumble was recovered by Packers LB Bill Forester, on the 22-yard line of Philadelphia. However, the Eagles D only gave up one first down, and after 5 plays, Lombadi elected to go for 3 points on 4th down this time, and Paul Hornung converted a 20-yard FG. Then the Eagles and the Packers traded punts; then the Eagles punted again. Then the Packers were driving into Eagles’ territory as the 1st quarter ended…Green Bay 3, Philadelphia 0.

2nd Quarter: an early-2nd-quarter FG by the Packers is answered with 10 points by the Eagles…The Packers’ drive stalled on the 17-yard line, and Hornung made it 6-0, with a 24-yard FG. Then the Eagles and the Packers traded punts. Then the Eagles finally started moving the ball, and scored a lightning-quick TD, after a pair of passes from Van Brocklin to Tommy McDonald (of 22 yards and 35 yards respectively). On the 35-yard-TD-pass, McDonald was knocked out of bounds after crossing the goal-line, right into the first row of the temporary bleachers. It was now 7-6, Eagles. Then the Packers went 3-and-out. The Eagles got the punt on their 26, and then Van Brocklin, now gaining confidence, threw a 41-yard completion to Split-End Pete Retzlaff, who made a fine over-the-head grab, this despite double coverage. Philly got to the Green Bay 8, but after 3 incompletions, they opted to kick, and Eagles K Bobby Walston converted a 15-yard FG. Then, with 3 minutes left in the first half, the Packers drove down the field, but once again failed to score from within the 20-yard-line, this time due to an errant Paul Hornung 17-yard FG-attempt that went wide-left…at Halftime, 10-6, Eagles.

3rd Quarter: no scoring…There were two crucial plays in the 3rd quarter. The first happened with the Packers on the Eagle 26, and driving once again. Paul Hornung was on a sweep; Hornung cut back, and was flattened by Chuck Bednarik and finished off by CB Tom Brookshier. The play put Paul Hornung out of the game (except for his kicking duties), and the pinched-nerve injury that resulted would plague Hornung for the rest of his career. This Packers drive failed (once again), when Jim Taylor was stopped by Bednarik on a 4th-and-2, inches short of the first down marker at the Eagle 24. Then the Eagles put together a drive that came up short when Van Brocklin was intercepted in the end-zone by Packers DB John Symank. Then the Packers went three-and-out. Then the second crucial play of the 3rd quarter occurred: in punt-formation, Green Bay WR/P Max McGee (who had noticed that Philly was not rushing the punter that day) faked the punt and ran up-field, untouched, for a 35-yard gain. The 3rd quarter ended with the Packers driving, at the Eagle 24, after a 14-yard pass play from Bart Starr to WR Gary Knafelc…with the score after 3 quarters: 10-6, Eagles.

4th Quarter: Packers regain the lead, but the Eagles drive to a late TD, and then hold the Packers as time runs out…As the 4th quarter began, the Packers finally found the end zone. From the Eagle 24, Green Bay moved 17 yards via three Jim Taylor runs and an 8-yard run by HB Tom Moore. Then Bart Starr connected with Max McGee for a TD, on a 7-yard slant-play. The Packers, who had gained significantly more first downs and yards throughout the game, reclaimed the lead, 13-10, with 13 minutes left. But the Packers were immediately on their back foot again. Because on the ensuing kickoff, Eagles rookie RB/KR Ted Dean ran it back 58 yards to the Packer 49. Van Brocklin drove the Eagles toward the Packer goal line, but passed the ball only once: 7 plays and a defensive holding found the Eagles on the Packer 5. Then the Greater Philadelphia-born Ted Dean made another huge play, with a five-yard TD run, on a sweep that was led by a key block from Guard Gerry Huth {see a photo of this title-winning play, in the illustration below}. The Eagles had reclaimed the lead (at 17-13), with 5:21 left in the game. The two teams then traded punts (again). Then the Packers got the ball on their 35 with just 1:05 left. They drove deep into Philadelphia territory, to the Eagle 22. With seconds to play (and no time-outs), Starr threw a short pass to Jim Taylor, who got past two defenders to the 8 before Bednarik and DB Bobby Jackson stopped him. Taylor tried to get to his feet, but Bednarik sat on him until time expired; then Chuck Bednarik said, “You can get up now, Jim, this game is over.”

The 1960 NFL title win was the Philadelphia Eagles’ last NFL title until the 2017 season, when the Eagles upset the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LII [52]. As of 2017, the Green Bay Packers would go on to win 7 more NFL titles, including 5 NFL titles in the 1960s alone (among them, the first two Super Bowl titles). The 1960 NFL title game was Vince Lombardi’s only playoff loss in his entire head-coaching-career, a loss he learned something from. He later rued the missed points from chip-shot Field Goals he forsook, saying: “When you get down there, come out with something. I lost the game, not my players.” {-Quote from When Pride Still Mattered, by David Maraniss, via this Jan. 2011 article by Jeré Longman, Eagles’ 1960 Victory Was an N.F.L. Turning Point (nytimes.com/sports).}

Below: 1960 NFL title game: Philadelphia Eagles 17, Green Bay Packers 13.
philadelphia-eagle_1960-nfl-champs_eagles-beat-packers_17-13_franklin-field_norm-van-brocklin_chuck-bednarik_ted-dean_buck-shaw_i_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
1960 Eagles and Packers helmets, illustrations by gridiron-uniforms.com/[1960]. Ticket from 1960 NFL title game, photo from pinterest.com. Franklin Field [view from top of the stands at 1960 title game], photo by AP via philadelphiaeagles.com. Pacers & Eagles captains shake hands after coin toss, photo by Philadelphia Eagles via courierpostonline.com. Norm Van Brocklin handing off to Bill Barnes (action from the 1st quarter), photo by Neil Leifer/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Chuck Bednarik making a tackle, photo by AP/colorization by John Turney at nflfootballjournal.blogspot.com. Rookie HB Ted Dean (#35) scoring the winning TD, a 5-yard run off a block from OG Gerry Huth (#65), photo by AP via nytimes.com/sports. Chuck Bednarik with Paul Hornung and Jim Taylor after 1960 NFL title game, photo by George Silk/Life magazine via flickriver.com. Bednarik, Van Brocklin and Ted Dean celebrate in the locker room with coach Shaw, photo unattributed at packershistory.net.

1960 Philadelphia Eagles: 3 All-Pro players; plus 4 from the ’60 Eagles that were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Note: All-Pro, below, means: 1960 AP, 1st team.
-Norm Van Brocklin: 1960 All-Pro (QB/P), and 1960 MVL (AP); Van Brocklin was inducted to the HoF in 1971.
-Tom Brookshier: 1960 All-Pro (CB).
-Chuck Bednarik: 1960 All-Pro (LB/C); Bednarik was inducted to the HoF in 1967.
-Sonny Jurgensen: (QB) inducted to the HoF in 1983.
-Tommy McDonald (WR): inducted to the HoF in 1998.

Helmet and uniforms changes for 1960 NFL…
1960: new helmet-logos (Cowboys & Cardinals)…
nfl_1960_2-new-helmet-logos_cowboys_cardinals_d_.gif
1961 NFL teams’ uniforms at Gridiron Uniform Database

-Expansion team (1960 Dallas Cowboys): the Dallas Cowboys wore white helmets their first 3 seasons. (The Cowboys’ distinctive blueish-silver helmet color, and pants color, were not introduced until 1964). The white helmet featured a large, plain dark-royal-blue star, and two thin dark-royal-blue center-stripes. The jerseys had contrasting shoulder-pad sections, with a large star at the top of each shoulder. {1960-63 era Cowboys: Eddie LeBarron and Don Mererdith (tailgatingjerseys.com).} {1960 Dallas Cowboys (gridiron-uniforms.com).}
dallas-cowboys_1963_1964_helmet_b_.gif

-Re-located team: in 1960, the St. Louis Cardinals, having just moved from Chicago to St. Louis, MO, introduced a helmet logo on their white helmets. The logo was a large frowning head of a cardinal (in deep red, with black around the cardinal’s eye, and a yellow beak), with the cardinal’s crest elongated so that, from the back of the helmet, the cardinals’ crests almost touch (you can see that in the link below). In a slightly altered form [2005], this logo remains to this day. Here is a photo of the original frowning-cardinal Cardinals helmet {Ken Grey game-worn 1960 helmet {helmet-hut.com)}. This helmet design is, in my opinion, one of the best ever seen in gridiron football. Especially as the years went by, and more and more NFL teams jumped on the colored-facemask-bandwagon, yet the Cardinals organization decided to keep the grey facemask. The re-design in 2005 made the cardinal more angry-looking in a cartoon-ish way {Cardinals helmet logos (sportslogos.net)} {Cardinals in huddle from 2009 (espn.com/blog)}. But at least the Cardinals kept the grey facemask.
st-louis-cardinals_arizona-cardinals_helmet_1960_2005_d_.gif

Other uniform-changes in the 1960 NFL…
-In 1960, the Philadelphia Eagles switched from silver pants to white pants. {1960 Philadelphia Eagles (gridiron-uniforms.com).}
-In 1960, the San Francisco 49ers added a some center-striping to their silver helmets: three red stripes (a thick stripe flanked by two thin stripes). {Photos, circa 1960-62, of San Francisco 49ers players (twitter.com/helmetaddict).} (The Niners would introduce a helmet-logo in 1962, and would switch from silver helmets and pants, to gold helmets and pants, in 1964.)

The following season of 1961 saw three more NFL teams adopt helmet-logos: in 1961 the Detroit Lions and the New York Giants would introduce helmet-logos, and the expansion-team the Minnesota Vikings would also sport a helmet-logo. So by 1961, of the 14 NFL teams, only four would not be wearing helmet-logos: the Browns, the Steelers, the Bears, and the 49ers. And in the following season of 1962, three of those teams would introduce helmet-logos, leaving only the Browns without a helmet-logo.
___

Eagles players on map page,
1960 Eagles uniforms, illustrations by Gridiron Uniforms database at gridiron-uniforms.com/[1960]. Circa 1958 Eagles helmet, photo by Heritage Auctions at ha.com. Circa 1960 Eagles pennant, photo from insidetheparkcollectibles.com. Tommy McDonald [photo circa 1961], photo by Neil Leifer via si.com. Pete Retzlaff [photo circa 1960], photo unattributed at prod.static.eagles.clubs.nfl.com. Ted Dean [1961 Fleer card], from amazon.com. Norm Van Brocklin [photo from Sports Illustrated, Dec. 19 1960], photo unattributed at sacrificefly.blogspot.com. Chuck Bednarik [1961 Fleer trading card], from kronozio.com/1961-Fleer-Chuck-Bednarik. Chuck Bednarik [photo from 1960], photo by Robert Riger/Getty Images via si.com. Tom Brookshier [photo circa 1959], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Marion Campbell [1960 Topps card], unattributed at pinterest.com. Sonny Jurgensen [photo circa 1961], photo unattributed at pinterest.com.

Offensive stats leaders on map page,
Milt Plum, 1961 Fleer card, from tradingcarddb.com. Johnny Unitas [photo circa 1964], photo by Focus In Sports/Getty Imgaes via pinterest.com. Jim Brown [photo from 1960], photo unattributed at jimbrown.clevelandbrowns.com. John David Crow [photo from 1962], photo by Neil Leifer/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Raymond Berry [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Sonny Randle [photo circa 1962], photo unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com. Paul Hornung, photo by Neil Leifer/Getrty Images via gettyimages.com.
___
Thanks to…
-Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to the contributors at pro-football-reference.com
-Thanks to the contributors at NFL 1960 season (en.wikipedia.org).
Special thanks to Tim Brulia, Bill Schaefer and Rob Holecko of The Gridiron Uniform Database, for giving billsportsmaps.com the permission to use football uniforms illustrations from Gridiron Uniform Database {GUD}.

August 22, 2018

2018-19 Football League Championship (2nd division England, incl. Wales): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division./+ 3 promoted clubs for the 2018-19 2nd division (Wigan Athletic, Blackburn Rovers, Rotherham United).

2018-19_football-league-championship_map_w-2018-crowds_titles_seasons-in-1st-division_post_c_.gif
2018-19 Football League Championship (2nd division England): map w/ 17/18-crowds-&-finishes + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division




By Bill Turianski on 22 August 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2018-19 Football League Championship (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats…CHAMPIONSHIP [Summary] (soccerway.com).
-Sky Bet Championship 2018 – 2019 [kits] (historicalkits.co.uk).


A brief re-cap of the 2017-18 League Championship [the English 2nd division]…
Promoted to the Premier League…Wolverhampton Wanderers, Cardiff City, Fulham. {see this post, billsportsmaps.com/[2018-19 Premier League]}.
Relegated from the Premier League down to the 2nd division are…Stoke City, Swansea City, West Bromwich Albion.
Relegated from the 2nd division down to the 3rd division are… Sunderland, Burton Albion, Barnsley.

Promoted up from the 3rd division and into the 2nd division are the three clubs profiled below…Wigan Athletic, Blackburn Rovers, Rotherham United.
All 3 clubs relegated in the 2016-17 EFL Championship won promotion straight back to the 2nd division for 2018-19.

    Below: the 3 promoted clubs to the 2018-19 EFL Championship [England, 2nd division] (Wigan Athletic, Blackburn Rovers, Rotherham United)…

• Wigan Athletic FC. Est. 1932. Nickname: the Latics. Colours: Light Royal Blue and White [usually with blue/white vertically-striped jerseys]. Location: Wigan, Greater Manchester, situated (by road) 41 km (27 mi) NW of Manchester; and situated (by road) 37 km (23 mi) NE of Liverpool. Population of Wigan: town-population is around 97,000; borough-population is around 318,000 {2011 census}.
Manager of Wigan Athletic: Paul Cook (age 51; born in Liverpool). {Paul Cook (leaguemanagers.com).} In the past 5 seasons, Paul Cook has gotten 3 Football League teams promoted: Chesterfield (in 2014, promoted to the 3rd div), Portsmouth (in 2017, promoted to the 3rd div), and now Wigan (in 2018, promoted to the 2nd div).

-Paul Cook commits to Wigan after promotion to Sky Bet Championship (from 8 May 2018 at skysports.com).

2018: Wigan Athletic bounce straight back to the 2nd division…
wigan-athletic_promoted-2018_dw-stadium_paul-cook_dan-burn_nathan-byrne_sam-morsy_nick-powell_will-grigg_f_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Wigan Athletic 17/18 jersey, photo from laticsstore.com. Wigan town centre, photo by Mike Blackstone at northwestimages.blogspot.com. Street-level shot of Wigan near the town centre, photo by razzmatazz at flickr.com. Rooftop-view of Wigan with DW Stadium in mid-ground, photo by graham at geograph.org. Aerial photo of DW Stadium, photo unattributed at burtonalbionfc.co.uk/getting-to-know-wigan-athletic. Interior shot of DW Stadium, photo unattributed at the72.co.uk. Nathan Byrne, photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Dan Burn, photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Sam Morsy, photo by Pete Norton/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Nick Powell, photo from wiganathletic.com. Will Grigg, photo by Reuters via saudigazette.com.sa. Wigan players celebrate promotion [21 April 2018 at Fleetwood], photo by Jonathan Hobley/Camerasport/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Paul Cook thanks traveling fans on promotion-day at Fleetwood, photo by Clint Hughes/PA Images/Getty Images via gettyimages.com.

•Blackburn Rovers FC. Est. 1875. Nickname: Rovers. Colours: Royal Blue and White halves [usually with red trim]. Location: Blackburn, Lancashire. Blackburn is situated (by road) 33 miles (53 km) NW of Manchester; and Blackburn is situated (by road) 41 miles (66 km) NE of Liverpool. Blackburn is situated (by road) 11 miles (18 km) W of Burnley. Blackburn is situated (by road) 233 miles (375 km) NW of London. Population of Blackburn: around 117,000 {2011 census}.
Manager of Blackburn: Tony Mowbray (age 54, born in Saltburn-by-sea, North Yorkshire).

-Blackburn’s Mowbray out to crack Venky’s puzzle with passage to India (by David Conn at theguardian.com/football).

2018: Blackburn Rovers bounce straight back to the 2nd division…
blackburn-rovers_promoted-2018_ewood-park_tony-mowbray_david-raya_charley-mulgrew_bradley-dack_danny-graham_k_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Blackburn jersey, photo from umbro.co.uk. Rooftop view of Blackburn, Lancashire, photo by Ken Ford at flickr.com via this thread at skyscrapercity.com/[Towns and Cities of Lancashire]. Aerial shot of Ewood Park, photo by Franco Sanna at flickr.com. David Raya, photo by Pete Norton/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Charley Mulgrew, photo by CameraSport via rovers.co.uk. Bradley Dack, photo by Pete Norton/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Danny Graham, photo unattributed at skysports.com. Tony Mowbray, photo from efl.com. Blackburn 17/18 away jersey, illustration by historicalkits.co.uk. Blackburn 17/18 away jersey badge, photo unattributed at kitman.co.uk. Blackburn Rovers’ Charlie Mulgrew celebrates scoring the goal that sees Blackburn promoted [Doncaster0-3 Blackburn, 21 April 2018], photo by Rachel Holborn/CameraSport via lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/sport/[Gallery]. Traveling Blackburn fans’ pitch invasion as Doncaster’s Keepmoat Stadium sprinklers go off, photo by Mick Atkins via thetimes.co.uk. Traveling Blackburn fans (during their pitch invasion) celebrating with Bradley Dack [Blackburn clinches promotion v Doncaster away, 21 April 2018], photo by Anna Gowthorpe/BPI/Rex/Shutterstock via theguardian.com/football/blog.

•Rotherham United FC. Est. 1925. Nickname: the Millers. Colours: Red-with-White sleeves. Location: Rotherham, South Yorkshire, situated (by road) 5.6 miles (9 km) NE of Sheffield city centre; and Rotherham is situated (by road) 32 miles (52 km) S of Leeds. Rotherham is situated (by road) 163 miles (263 km) N of central London. Population of Rotherham: town-population is around 109,000; Rotherham is part of the Sheffield urban area, which has a population of around 685,000 {2011 census figures}.
Manager of Rotherham, Paul Warne (age 45, born in Norwich, Norfolk).

-Richard Wood fires Rotherham back to Championship with play-off final double (by Nick Miller on 27 May 2018 at theguardian.com/football).

2018: Rotherham United bounce straight back to the 2nd division…
rotherham-united_promoted-2018_new-york-stadium_paul-warne_joe-newell_richard-wood_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Rotherham 18/19 jersey, photo from
rotherhamunitedshop.co.uk. Street in Rotherham, photo by Ben Sutherland at flickr.com. Aerial shot of the New York Stadium, photo by Alex Roebuck at alexroebuck.photoshelter.com. Drone-photo of the New York Stadium, photo unattributed at hullcitysupporterstrust.com. Screenshot of Richard Wood about to head in 1st goal for Rotherham at Wembley, screenshot from video uploaded by Watch Football at youtube.com. Shrewbury equalises, screenshot from video uploaded by Watch Football at youtube.com. Wood after scoring winner, photo by John Patrick Fletcher/Action Plus via Getty Images via lastwordonfootball.com. Joe Newell and Richard Wood being interviewed by Sky Sports after Rotherham’s play-off final win at Wembley, screenshot from themillers.co.uk/teams/first-team/midfielder/joe-newell. Rotherham promotion parade (29 May 2018), photo by ITV at itv.com/news. PaulWarne with trophy at promotion parade, photo by Richard Sellars/PA Images via Getty Images at gettyimages.com.

___
Thanks to all at the following…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-England – First Level All-Time Tables 1888/89-2015/16 (rsssf.com).
-Attendances from E-F-S site, european-football-statistics.co.uk/attn.htm.
-EFL Championship 2018-19.

August 7, 2018

2018-19 Premier League (1st division England, including Wales) – location-map with chart, including 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division./+ the three promoted clubs for 2018-19 (Wolverhampton Wanderers, Cardiff City, Fulham).

http://billsportsmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2018-19_premier-league_map_w-2018-crowds_all-time-seasons-in-1st-div_titles_post_c_.gif
2018-19 Premier League (1st division England, including Wales) – location-map with chart, including 17/18-crowds-&-finish + titles-&-seasons-in-1st-division





By Bill Turianski on 7 August 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2018-19 Premier League (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats…SUMMARY – Premier League [2018-19] (us.soccerway.com).
-Guardian/football’s Premier League page…theguardian.com/premier-league.
-Kits…Premier League 2018 – 2019 (historicalkits.co.uk).

A brief re-cap of 2017-18…
Champions…Manchester City.
Teams that qualified for Europe…Champions League Group Stage: Manchester City, Manchester United, Tottenham. CL GS play-off round: Liverpool. Europa League Group Stage: Chelsea, Arsenal. EL GS 2nd qualifying round: Burnley.
Teams that were relegated to the 2nd division…West Bromwich Albion, Stoke City, Swansea City.
Teams that were promoted from the 2nd division to the Premier League…the 3 clubs profiled below…

    Below: illustrations for the 3 promoted clubs
    (Wolverhampton Wanderers, Cardiff City, Fulham)
    •Wolverhampton Wanderers FC.

Est. 1877. Nicknames: Wolves; the Wanderers. Colours: Old Gold [aka Pale Orange] and Black. Location: Wolverhampton, West Midlands, situated (by road) 17 miles (28 km) NW of Birmingham; Wolverhampton is situated (by road) 130 miles (210 km) NW of central London. Population of Wolverhampton: city-population of around 256,000 {2014 estimate}.

Manager of Wolverhampton Wanderers, Nuno Espírito Santo (age 44, born in Portuguese São Tomé and Príncipe).

-From the Guardian, Wolves’ link with agent Jorge Mendes to face Premier League scrutiny •Portuguese’s Molineux relationship will have to pass top-flight test; •FA and EFL fail to explain how arrangement complies with rules (by David Conn on 17 April 2018 at theguardian.com/football).

Below: Wolves win the 2017-18 EFL Championship, clinch promotion with 4 games to spare, and return to the Premier League after a 6-year absence…
wolverhampton_promoted-2018_molineux_nuno-espirito-santo_d-jota_leo-bonatini_ivan-cavaleiro_barry-douglas_john-ruddy_conor-coady_ruben-neves_r_.gif
Photo and Image credits -
Wolves 17/18 jersey, photo unattributed at footyheadlines.com. Aerial shot of Wolverhampton including University of Wolverhampton and Molineux Stadium, photo from wlv.ac.uk via pinterest.com. Aerial shot of Molineux, photo by PA via itv.com/newswolverhampton-named-least-prosperous-place-in-uk. John Ruddy, photo by Getty Images via express.co.uk/football. Connor Coady, photo by David Rogers/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Rúben Neves, photo by James Baylis AMA via expressandstar.com/football. Diogo Jota, photo by James Bayliss/AMA via shropshirestar.com. Ivan Cavaleiro, photo by David Rogers/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Léo Bonatini, photo by James Bayliss/AMA via gettyimages.fr. Barry Douglas, photo by AMA via expressandstar.com/football. John Ruddy makes penalty save at Cardiff, photo by PA via mirror.co.uk/football. Nuno Espírito Santo celebrating win in Cardiff, photo unattributed at espn.com/soccer.

    •Cardiff City FC.

Est. 1877. Nickname: the Bluebirds. Colours: Blue, with white trim. Location: Cardiff, Glamorgan, South Wales, Wales, UK. Cardiff is situated (by road) 41 miles (66 km) E of Swansea; and Cardiff is situated (by road) 152 miles (244 km) W of central London. Population of Cardiff: city-population of around 361,000; metro-area population of Greater Cardiff/South Wales Valleys: around 1.09 million {2016 estimates}.

Manager of Cardiff City, Neil Warnock (age 69, born Sheffield, West Yorkshire).

-From the Guardian, Cardiff may not be liked but Neil Warnock’s achievement is remarkable – The promotion king has forged a rugged, uncompromising and successful side from a bunch of misfits and the Premier League is in for an uncomfortable ride (by Nick Miller at theguardian.com/football/blog).

-From BBC/football, Neil Warnock: Anatomy of a promotion winner (by Chris Nathan at bbc.com/sport/football).

Below: After 4 seasons in the 2nd tier, unheralded Cardiff City are promoted to the 2018-19 Premier League on the final day of the season…
cardiff-city_promoted-2018_cardiff-city-stadium_neil-warnock_jumior-hoillet_callum-patterson_kenneth-zohore_sean-morrison_d_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Cardiff City jersey, from cardiffcityfcstore.com. Aerial shot of Cardiff and Cardiff Bay, photo unattributed at airlines-airports.com. Cardiff City Stadium, aerial shot, photo unattributed at telegraph.co.uk/football. Callum Paterson, photo unattributed at 7msport.com. Sean Morrison, photo from cardiffcityfc.co.uk. Kenneth Zohore, photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images via theguardian.com/football. Junior Hoilett, photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com. Cardiff City fans’ pitch invasion, 1st image: screenshot from video at walesonline.co.uk/football; 2nd image: photo by Richard Joyce at twitter.com/@RichardDJoyce; 3rd image: photo by Simon Galloway via the42.ie. Cardiff City manager Neil Warnock and captain Sean Morrison lift the promotion-trophy, photo by Reuters via dailymail.co.uk/sport/football.

    •Fulham FC.

Est. 1879, as St. Andrews Cricket & Football Club. Nickname: the Cottagers. Colours: White jersey, Black pants, Red trim. Location: Fulham, London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, West London W6. Fulham is situated (by road) 4.4 miles (7.0 km) W of central London. Population of Fulham: city-population of around 87,000 {2011 census} [Fulham is within the metro-area population of Greater London, which is around 14.4 million {2016 estimate}].

Manager of Fulham, Slaviša Jokanović (age 45, born in Novi Sad, SFR Yugoslavia).

-From the Guardian, Drills, travels and tactics: the keys to Slavisa Jokanovic’s Fulham success (by Paul MacInnes on 26 May 2018 at guardian/football).

Fulham wins the 2018 League Championship Play-off Final (Fulham promoted back to the Premier League after 4 seasons in the 2nd division).
fulham_promoted-2018_craven-cottage_slavisa-jokanovic_tom-cairney_ryan-sessegnon_ryan-fredericks_aleksandar-mitrovic_c_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Fulham jersey, unattributed at footyheadlines.co.theyneverlinktosources. Aerialshot of Craven Cottage from visitfloridablog.org via news.wfsu.org. Craven Cottage, exterior view from across the River Thames, photo unattributed at cardiffcityfc.co.uk. Street-view of exterior of Craven Cottage on Stevenage Road, photo unattributed at pinterest.com. Street-view of front gate of Craven Cottage with the cottage in background, photo by texantreks.com/2011/12/my-trip-to-craven-cottage-for-fulham. Shot of Jimmy Haynes Stand at Craven Cottage, photo unattributed at pinterest.co.uk. Ryan Fredericks, photo unattributed at blog.tipbet.com. Tom Cairney, photo unattributed at joe.co.uk/sport. Ryan Sessegnon, photo by REX Features via telegraph.co.uk/football. Aleksandar Mitrović, photo unattributed at themag.co.uk. Slaviša Jokanović (Fulham manager), photo by Nick Potts/PA Wire via football.london/fulham-fc. Fulham win semifinals over Derby/pitch invasion, photo from twitter.com/[@MJPotts17]. Sessegnon passes to Cairney to set up winnng goal, screenshot from youtube.com. Tom Cairney scores winning goal in 2018 Championship play-offs Final, photo from efl.com/news/play-off-final-captain-cairney-carries-cottagers-up. Cairney after scoring, photo unattributed at independent.ie/sport.

___
Thanks to all at the following…
-Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Attendances from E-F-S site, european-football-statistics.co.uk/attn.htm.
-England – First Level All-Time Tables 1888/89-2015/16 (rsssf.com).
-Thanks to the contributors at 2017-18 Premier League & 2018-19 Premier League (en.wikipedia.org).

July 27, 2018

England, 1st division – all-time: List of all clubs with at least one season in the English 1st division (120 seasons/since 1888-89/65 clubs); with English titles listed.

england_1st-division-premier-league_120-seasons_chart-of-all-time-most-seasons-in-1st-div_by-club_w-seasons_consec_titles_colours-and-crest_post_i_.gif
England, 1st division – all-time: List of all clubs with at least one season in the English 1st division (120 seasons/since 1888-89/65 clubs)





By Bill Turianski on 27 July 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2018–19 Premier League (en.wikipedia.org).
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats (us.soccerway.com).

Sources…
-Club League History Summary 1888-89 to 2018-19 Seasons spent by each of the 140 Clubs in the Four Flights of English League Football from 1888-89 to 2018-19 (myfootballfacts.com).
-English Clubs Divisional Movements 1888-2016 (rsssf.com).
-historicalkits.co.uk.

The chart can be seen by clicking on the image at the top of this post.
The chart shows 5 things…
A) Seasons in the English 1st division [120 seasons, counting 2018-19 (since 1888-89)]. 65 clubs in total have played in the English 1st division. Shown in a dark-blue column.
B) Consecutive seasons in the 1st division [pertaining to the 20 Premier League clubs in 2018-19].
C) Last season that the club was previously in the 1st Division [pertaining to all the clubs (42 clubs) with history in the top flight, but who are below the 1st division 2018-19; or defunct clubs (3 defunct clubs with 1st division history/see last paragraph)].
D) An illustration of each clubs’s jersey worn the last time the club was in the 1st division; for the twenty Premier League teams of 2018-19, the jersey shown is the current one. All jersey illustrations are from the excellent and very comprehensive site called Historical Football Kits {historicalkits.co.uk}.
E) English titles [1st division title, since 1888-89: First Division titles, 1889-1992 / Premier League titles, 1993-2018 (119 titles)]. Shown in a dark-purple column. Title-holders’ crests are shown alongside.
…And at the far left-hand-side of the chart, three more things are shown…
F) Current club jersey badge.
G) Current club colours.
H) Current level of the club [2018-19], within the English football pyramid…Levels: 1=1st division aka Premier League; 2=2nd division aka Football League Championship; 3=3rd division aka Football League One; 4=4th division aka Football League Two; 5=5th division [non-League] aka the National League; 6=6th tier comprised of 2 regionalised leagues [National League North & National League South]; 7=7th tier comprised of 4 regionalised leagues [Northern League, Southern League Central, Southern League South, Isthmian League]; 8= 8th tier comprised of 8 regionalised leagues;…

Below, the 10 clubs in English football with the most seasons spent in the 1st division…

Everton have played the most years in the English 1st division – 116 top flight seasons. Liverpool-based Everton were a founding member of the 1st Division in 1888-89. Everton have only been relegated twice (in 1929 and in 1950), and have played just 4 seasons in the 2nd division. Everton have played in the 1st division consecutively since 1954-55 (65 straight seasons).

Second-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Aston Villa – 105 seasons. But of course right now, the Birmingham-based Aston Villa are stuck in the 2nd division. 2018-19 will be the 3rd straight year Villa are out of the Premier League.  Aston Villa were a founding member of the 1st Division in 1888-89.

Third-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Liverpool – 104 seasons. And Liverpool have been in the top flight for 57 straight seasons (since 1962-63).

Fourth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Arsenal – 102 seasons. And the North-London-based Arsenal have been in the top flight for a record 94 straight seasons (since 1919-20).

Fifth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Manchester United – 94 seasons. The Greater-Manchester-based Man United have been in the top flight for 44 straight seasons (since 1975-76).

Sixth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Manchester City – 90 seasons. The City-of-Manchester-based Man City have been in the top flight for 17 straight seasons (since 2002-03).

Seventh-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Newcastle United – 87 seasons. 2018-19 will be the Tyne-and-Wear-based Newcastle’s second season back in the Premier League.

Eighth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Sunderland – 86 seasons. The Tyne-and-Wear-based Sunderland, relegated from the Premier League in 2016-17, suffered a second-straight relegation in 2017-18, and are now stuck in the 3rd division.

Joint-Ninth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Tottenham Hotspur – 84 seasons. The North-London-based Spurs have been in the top flight for 41 straight seasons (since 1978-79).

Joint-Ninth-most seasons in the 1st division belongs to Chelsea – 84 seasons. The West-London-based Chelsea have been in the top flight for 30 straight seasons (since 1989-90).

Note:
There are three clubs that have history in the English 1st Division, which are now defunct…
-Wimbledon FC (19 seasons in the 1st division, most recently in 1999-2000), (1889-2004)/Dissolved/Franchise became Milton Keynes FC (est. 2004). Milton Keynes FC [4th-division] have divested itself of Wimbledon FC’s titles & honours. South-London-based AFC Wimbledon [a current 3rd-division side], is the Phoenix-club of Wimbledon FC.
-Accrington FC (5 seasons in the 1st division, in the late Nineteenth century), (1878-96)/Dissolved. Accrington FC, a Lancashire-based club that was a founding member of the First Division in 1888-89, was an entirely separate club from Accrington Stanley FC (1891-1968), or Accrington Stanley FC (est. 1968) [a current 3rd-division side].
-Darwen FC (2 seasons in the 1st division, in the late Nineteenth century), (1870-2009)/Dissolved. Darwen FC was a Lancashire-based club that was dissolved in 2009, when they were a 9th-level team.
__
Thanks to…
My Football Facts.com,
RSSSF.com, and
Historical Football Kits/[English Clubs section].

July 11, 2018

2018-19 National League [Non-League/5th division England], map with 17/18-crowds-&-finishes chart./+ Illustrations for the 4 promoted clubs (Salford City, Harrogate Town, Havant & Waterlooville, Braintree Town).

2018-19_national-league_aka-conference_map_w-2018-attendances_post_d_.gif
2018-19 National League (aka the Conference) [5th division England], map with 17/18-crowds-&-finishes chart



By Bill Turianski on 11 July 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2018-19 National League (en.wikipedia.org).
-Official site…thenationalleague.org.uk.
-Table, fixtures, results, attendance, stats…SUMMARY – National League [2018-19] (us.soccerway.com).
-5th division/National League page at BBC.com…bbc.com/sport/football/national-league.

Brief re-cap of the 2017-18 5th division…

Promoted to the Football League [4th division]…Macclesfield Town won the 2016-17 National League, winning automatic promotion back to the Football League, after 5 seasons back in Non-League football. Tranmere Rovers won the Play-off final, beating Boreham Wood 2-1, after being stuck in non-League football for 3 seasons.

Now relegated down to non-League/5th division/National League are… Chesterfield and Barnet.

    Promoted up from the 6th division and into the National League/5th division are the four clubs profiled below…
    (Promoted from National League North: Salford City and Harrogate Town. /
    Promoted from National League South: Havant & Waterlooville and Braintree Town.)
    Salford City FC.

Est. 1940. Colours: Red shirts, White pants, Black trim…‘ The club’s colours are red, white and black [in tribute to Machester United's colours]. Prior to the change in ownership in 2014, the club played in tangerine and black (earlier colours include tangerine and white, and all navy blue).’…{-excerpt from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salford_City_F.C.}. Nickname: the Ammies [ie, the Amateurs]. Location: Kersal, Borough of Salford, Greater Manchester. Population of Kersal: around 12,900 {2014 figure}. Population of Salford: city-population of around 248,000 {2016 estimate}. Kersal, Salford is situated 2.75 miles (4.5 km) NW of Manchester city centre. Kersal, Salford is situated (by road) 203 miles (327 km) NW of London.
Manager of Salford City, Graham Alexander (age 46, born in Coventry, West Midlands). Alexander, the former Fleetwood Town and Scunthorpe United manager, was hired by Salford City on 14 May 2018.

Salford City: from the 8th tier, to the 5th division, in 4 seasons…
That Salford City have now achieved 3 promotions in 4 seasons  should come as no surprise. That is because there is big money propelling the club forward. ‘Class of 92′-/-former-Manchester-United stars Gary Neville, Phil Neville, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, and Nicky Butt bought the club in March 2014. Indeed, the consortium has ambitious aims for the non-League club, with a target of reaching the 2nd division (the League Championship) by 2029 (a 15-year-plan, as it were). In January 2015, manager Phil Power was sacked and the dual-manager team of Bernard Morley and Anthony Johnson were brought in. (Morley and Johnson had had success at another Greater Manchester-based lower-non-League club, Ramsbottom United: the two had gotten Ramsbottom promoted to the 7th tier in 2014.) Three months later in April 2015, Salford City won promotion from the 8th tier by winning the Northern Premier League D1-North, beating out Darlington by 4 points. That season (14/15), Salford City drew 384 per game (4th-highest in the league that year).

In September 2015, the Class-of-92-five sold half their stake in Salford City to Valencia CF owner Peter Lim (who is a Hong Kong-based billionaire), so that meant the Salford City project had even more wealth behind it. Then Salford City got a fair deal of exposure in October 2015, when the club was featured in the BBC television series ‘Class of 92: Out of their League’. And in November 2015, Salford City (est. 1940) qualified for the FA Cup 1st round for the first time ever, beating Notts County 2-0 (in a televised match), before losing to Hartlepool in a 2nd round replay.

In that 2015-16 season, the first full season under Morley-and-Johnson, Salford City were in the play-off places for most of the season. They finished in 3rd, and then beat Ashton United in the semi-final, and then beat Workington in the final, 2-0, in front of 2,000 at the old Moor Lane. That crowd there for that play-off final was about 1,300 larger than Salford usually drew back then (Salford drew 642 per game in 2015-16).

By 2016-17, Salford City, playing their first-ever season in the 6th tier (the National League North), had more than doubled their crowds. The club drew 1,395 per game in 2016-17. But Salford, who finished 3rd, flamed out in the play-offs, losing in the semi-finals to the eventual play-offs winner, Halifax Town.

In late 2016, the club had began a complete re-development of their Moor Lane ground. {See this article from StadiumDB.com, See what Salford City are building in less than a year.} On the 19th of October 2017, just eleven months later, the completely new venue was opened, with a new name: the Peninsula Stadium. {See this, Sir Alex Ferguson opens new Salford City stadium as Manchester United legends Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes and Gary Neville watch on (dailymail.co.uk/football).} This, of course, drew even more fans to Salford City matches. In 2017-18, Salford ended up drawing 1,611 per game, which is about 1,200 more than they were drawing 3 seasons ago.

Meanwhile, in the 2017-18 season, Salford City cruised to the National League South title with relative ease. They had picked up, on a free transfer from Rochdale, a local-born striker, Jack Redshaw, who had a good deal of Football League experience (with Morecambe, particularly, scoring 15 goals for the Shrimps in 2012-13). Redshaw, evidently comfortable playing a couple levels lower and back in his home town, led Salford City with 17 league goals. For a time, it looked like the prolific-scoring Harrogate Town would contest the title, but the North Yorkshire side faltered down the stretch, while Salford won 5 straight from late-March-to-mid-April. And so, on the 21st of April, before a crowd of 2,466, Salford City clinched the title (and automatic promotion), with a game to spare, despite losing on the day (to Boston United 1-2) (see photo of Salford City fans’ pitch-invasion/celebration, below).

Then on 8 May, two-and-a-half weeks after clinching automatic promotion to the 5th division, joint-managers Anthony Johnson and Bernard Morley stepped down, because they could not come to an agreement with Salford City regarding new contracts. {See this article from official Salford City site, Mutual Consent (from 8 May 2018 at salfordcityfc.co.uk). Also see this short thread at Reddit/soccer [link at end of paragraph], and specifically this comment there…’The press release mentioned differences about personal terms and contract length. I think the last run of the documentary on the club had touched about that as well. Basically Salford were willing to pay top dollar for the best players/managers in the division. The whole team was basically poached from other teams in the division or even one or two division up. For the co-managers i believe that they were the highest paid manager in that division and the one above. The problem was that when it was divided by two, it wasn’t really more than what they were making in jobs outside’…(comment by szu at reddit.com/soccer/[thread: Salford part ways with joint-managers].}

Salford City might not make it to the 2nd division before 2030, but it is starting to look like this club, from a few miles north of Old Trafford, will be playing in the Football League pretty soon.

Salford City: promoted to the 5th division for the first time…
salford-city_promoted-2018_moor-lane_aka-peninsula-stadium_anthony-johnson_bernard-morley_jack-redshaw_carl-piergianni_michael-nottingham_tom-walker_manu-class-of-92_m_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Salford City 17/18 jersey, photo from umbro.co.uk/salford-city-fc. Salford Quays, photo by khaosproductions at flickr.com. Aerial shot of Peninsula Stadium, photo unattributed at thenationalleague.org.uk. Interior shot of Peninsula Stadium, photo by Shaun Best at twitter.com/@shaun_best. Carl Piergianni, photo by @SalfordCityFC at twitter.com/SalfordCityFC. Michael Nottingham, photo by Gareth Lyons at picssr.com. Tom Walker, photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images Europe via zimbio.com.
Jack Redshaw, photo by Salford City at twitter.com/@SalfordCityFC. Co-managers Bernard Morley and Anthony Johnson, photo unattributed at mirror.co.uk/football. ‘Class of 92′ Man U players who are co-owners Salford City (G Neville, N Butt, G Neville, R Giggs, P Scholes), photo by BBC via standard.co.uk. Fans and players celebrate promotion, photo from manchestereveningnews.co.uk/football.

    • Harrogate Town AFC.

Est. 1914. Colours: Black-and Yellow [vertically-striped jerseys]. Location: Harrogate, North Yorkshire. Population of Harrogate: around 75,000 {2011 census}. Harrogate is situated (by road) 16 miles (26 km) N of Leeds. Harrogate is situated (by road) 21 miles (34 km) W of York. Harrogate is (by road) 210 miles (338 km) N of central London.

‘Harrogate (HARR-ə-gət) is a spa town in North Yorkshire, England. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town is a tourist destination and its visitor attractions include its spa waters and RHS Harlow Carr gardens. 13 miles (21 km) away from the town centre is the Yorkshire Dales national park…’ {-excerpt from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrogate}.

Manager of Harrogate Town, Simon Weaver (age 40, born in Doncaster). Simon Weaver has been manager of Harrogate Town for 9 years now. Weaver played 16 seasons as a MF, mainly in the 5th division, including 3 Football League seasons (at Lincoln City and at Kidderminster). In May 2009, he was hired as the player/manager of Conference South side Harrogate.

In 2010-11 Harrogate Town were a mid-table 6th-tier side, drawing 293 per game. In June 2011, Simon’s father, Irving (a multi-millionaire property developer), took over Harrogate Town. In 2017-18, the club went full-time professional, a rare step for a 6th-tier club. In the 6-year-span from 2012 to 2018, Harrogate Town saw an increase in crowd-size of over 800 per game: the club averaged 1,134 per game in 2017-18. A good family atmosphere at their Wetherby Road ground, and a good relationship with the Harrogate supporters trust, has helped increase their crowds. The team’s brand of football has probably helped swell crowds, too, as Harrogate were the highest-scoring team in the 6th tier by far. In 2017-18, the Harrogate squad were a well-organized unit that scored 100 goals, 19 more than anyone else in both the National Leagues North and South. But Harrogate were unable to keep pace with Salford City, and finished in 2nd place, giving them a bye in the first round of the play-offs. In the semi-finals, Harrogate Town beat Chorley 2-1, with both goal scored by Dominic Knowles, with the winning goal scored in the 94th minute. In the play-off final, Dominic Knowles scored a brace again, as Harrogate beat Brackley Town 3-0, in front of 3,000 at Wetherby Road (see screenshots and photos below).

And so 6 seasons after his father took over as owner of Harrogate Town, Simon Weaver’s Harrogate team have won promotion to the 5th division. And so now in 2018-19, following the back-to-back relegations of nearby York City, Harrogate Town are the highest-placed club from the county of North Yorkshire.

Harrogate Town: promoted to the 5th division for the first time…
harrogate-town_promoted-2018_wetherby-road_simon-weaver_joe-leesley_josh-falkingham_james-belshaw_dominic-knowles_d_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Harrogate Town 17/18 jersey, from harrogatetownafc.com/online-store. View of Harrogate town centre, photo by Alamy via dailymail.co.uk. Wetherby Road front gate/office, photo by Joseph Gibbons at gibbos92.wordpress.com/2015/12/07/harrogate-town-fc-wetherby-road. Main Stand at Wetherby Road, photo by benrobinsongroundphotos.weebly.com/harrogate-town_wetherby-road. Family Stand, photo by Joseph Gibbons at gibbos92.wordpress.com/2015/12/07/harrogate-town-fc-wetherby-road. The two-way slope in the pitch at Wetherby Road, photo by thedribblingcode.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/sat-29-oct-2011-harrogate-town-v-hyde-conf-north. James Belshaw, photo from twitter.com/@HarrogateTown. Joe Leesley, photo by Ian Hodgson at dailymail.co.uk/football. Josh Falkingham, photo from harrogatetownafc.com. Dominic Knowles, photo from yorkshirepost.co.uk. Simon Weaver, photo from strayfm.com/news. Screenshot of 2nd goal (by Dominic Knowles) in 2018 National League South play-off final, image from HIGHLIGHTS | Harrogate Town 3-0 Brackley Town (Play-off Final) (uploaded by Through The Lens Visuals at youtube.com). Dominic Knowles, photo from yorkshirepost.co.uk. Promotion celebration, image from HIGHLIGHTS | Harrogate Town 3-0 Brackley Town (Play-off Final) (uploaded by Through The Lens Visuals at youtube.com).

    •Havant & Waterlooville FC.

Est. 1998, via merger of: Havant Town FC, and Waterlooville FC. Colours: White with blue and yellow trim. Location: Havant, Hampshire. Population of Havant: around 45,000 {2011 census}. Population of Waterlooville: around 64,000 {2011 census}. Havant is situated (by road) 7 miles (12 km) NE of Portsmouth. Havant is situated (by road) 71 miles (114 km) SW of central London.

Manager of Havant & Waterlooville, Lee Bradbury (age 43, born in Cowes, Isle of Wight). Bradbury has been manager of Havant & Waterlooville for 5-and-a-half years now (since Nov. 2012). He was previously the youth team coach at Portsmouth. And before that, Bradbury was manager of the then-3rd-division Bournemouth (from Jan. 2011 to March 2012).
-Bradbury’s Hawks Sign Off Historic Season With Treble (thenationalleague.org.uk).

Havant & Waterlooville were formed in 1998, the result of a merger between two 8th-level/Southern League D1 South clubs: Havant Town FC, and Waterlooville FC. They are nicknamed the Hawks, and play at the small and bare-bones West Leigh Park in Havant, Hampshire. Havant is about 7 miles (by road) NE of Portmouth. Waterlooville is about 5 miles NW of Havant, and Waterlooville is about 8 miles N of Portsmouth. Havant & Waterlooville FC are most famous for their exploits in the 2007-08 FA Cup, when the Hawks beat Bognor Regis, Fleet Town, Leighton Town, York City (in the 1st round), Notts County (in the 2nd round), and then-3rd-tier-side Swansea City 4–2 (in a 3rd round replay). This amazing Cup run was capped off by dream 4th round tie at Liverpool, where Havant & Waterlooville took 6,000 fans. There at Anfield, Havant & Waterlooville actually took the lead twice on Liverpool, but they ended up losing 5-2. {Heroic Havant [Liverpool 5-2 Havant & Waterlooville, FA Cup 4th round match from 28 Jan 2008], by Kieran Fox at news.bbc.co.uk.}

Havant & Waterlooville had been charter-members of the Conference South in 2004-05, and had played in that 6th-tier league for 12 straight seasons before relegation to the 7th level, which happened on the final day of the 2015-16 season. Then Havant & Waterlooville bounced straight back to the 6th tier by winning the 2016-17 Isthmian League by 2 points over Bognor Regis.

Then in 2017-18, back in the National League South, Havant & Waterlooville ran neck-and-neck with Kent/Thames Estuary side Dartford, for the title. Havant played very well down the stretch (ultimately going 7-wins-2-draws-1-loss in their last 10 matches). But Dartford were even better, and had gained on Havant – Dartford won their last 9 matches. In their penultimate matches, Dartford won 2-0 over Bath City; but Havant & Waterlooville, in front of 1,153 at West Leigh Park, thrashed East Thurrock 6-1, scoring 4 goals in the last 28 minutes. (That flurry of late goals proved the crucial difference in the title-race.)

So with one more game to play in the 17/18 National League South, that made it Dartford and Havant & Waterlloville even on points, but with Havant having a goal-difference that was four better than Dartford. On final match-day, going into the final minutes, it was Dartford leading 1-2 to Bath City away, while Havant & Waterlooville, who had blown their 2-goal lead, were knotted 2-2 to Concord Rangers at West Leigh Park. Then in the 89th minute, Havant’s top scorer Jason Prior slotted home from the near left side (see photo and screenshots below). And Havant & Waterlooville had won the National League South over Dartford, thanks only to a goal difference of 3.

So now Havant & Waterlooville have made it two straight promotions, and will play in the 5th division for the first time. Havant & Waterlooville drew 879 per game in 2017-18. They will be one of the 4 or 5 smallest clubs in the 5th tier (if you go by crowd-size). Only Boreham Wood and Gateshead drew less in the National League last season, and Solihull drew the same as Havant did (879). And besides Braintree Town, the other newly-promoted sides drew higher (Salford and Harrogate).

Havant & Waterlooville: promoted to the 5th division for the first time.
havant-and-waterlooville_promoted-2018_west-leigh-park_lee-bradbury_ryan-young_wes-fogden_rory-williams_jason-prior_m_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Havant & Waterlooville jersey, illustration from havantandwaterloovillefc.co.uk/shop. Aerial shot of West Leigh Park, image from bing.com/maps/Bird’s Eye satellite view. West Leigh Park [from an evening match in 2010], photo by Stuart Noel at footballstadiums.wordpress.com/2010/01/27/west-leigh-park-havant. Jason Prior, photo from havantandwaterloovillefc.co.uk. Lee Bradury, photo from havantandwaterloovillefc.co.uk. Ryan Young, photo from havantandwaterloovillefc.co.uk. Wes Fogden, photo unattributed at portsmouth.co.uk/football. Rory Williams, photo from portsmouth.co.uk/football. Jason Prior and Havant fans celebrate the promotion-winning goal in extra-time, screenshot from video uploaded by Marsh Media at youtube.com/[Havant & Waterlooville PROMOTION WINNING goal! (Jason Prior)]. Jason prior after scoring the goal that got them promoted, photo from havantandwaterloovillefc.co.uk. Pitch invasion following promotion-win, 2 screenshots from video uploaded by Groundhopping FC at youtube.com.

    •Braintree Town .

Est. 1898, as Manor Works FC. Colours: Orange jerseys [previously yellow jerseys]. Population of Braintree, Essex: around 53,000 {2011 census}. Braintree is situated 10 miles (16 km) NE of Chelmsford and 15 miles (24 km) W of Colchester. Braintree is situated (by road) 51 miles (87 km) NE of central London.

Braintree Town began in 1898 as Manor Works FC, the works team of the Crittall Window Company. The company manufactured iron windows (and still is located in Essex, in the adjacent town of Witham). Back in 1898, this works team literally worked with iron, and that was the basis for their nickname of the Iron. That being said, the fact was that in 1898, the new club took over most of the squad of the recently defunct Braintee FC of the North Essex League. (The Crittall Window company was founded in 1889 in Braintree, Essex. By the mid-1890s the Crittall company employed 30 men. By 1907, the company had expanded and branched out with the Detroit Steel Product Co, the first steel window factory in the United States. By 1918, the Crittall Window Company employed 500 men.)

By 1911, Manor Works FC joined the Essex & Suffolk Border League (where they remained until 1928). In 1921, Manor Works FC changed its name to Crittall Athletic FC, to be more closely identified with their parent company. Crittall Athletic were founder members of the Eastern Counties League in 1935, and largely remained part of that competition for around 50 years. While part of the Metropolitan League in 1968, Crittall Athletic changed its name to Braintree & Crittall Athletic. They re-joined the Eastern Counties League in 1970. In 1981, all links with the Crittall Window Company were severed, and the club changed its name to Braintree FC. The following year of 1982 saw the club change to its present-day name of Braintree Town FC.

A decade later, in 1991, Braintree Town won promotion to the Southern League. But by 1996, travel costs were hurting the small club, so they asked league officials to be switched over to the Isthmian League, in order to reduce traveling fees. And so they were placed into the Division Three of the Isthmian League, although it was an effective drop of two divisions. But that did not hold back Braintree Town at all, because they promptly got themselves promoted twice in 2 seasons, ascending to the Isthmian League Division One in 1998. And after three seasons in the Isthmian League D-1, they were promoted to the Isthmian League Premier Division in 2001. Five seasons later, in 2005-06, Braintree Town won the Isthmian League Premier Division, winning promotion to the Conference South. That 2005-06 season also saw Braintree Town reach the 1st round of the FA Cup for the first time (losing 4–1 at Shrewsbury Town).

Braintree Town played 6 straight seasons in the 5th division, from 2011- to ’17. From 2006-07 to 2010-11, Braintree Town were a 6th division side that were drawing in the 400-500 range. They qualified for the Conference South play-off play-offs 3 times in this 5-season-span, and won promotion to the 5th division in 2010-11 by winning the Conference South by 7 points over Farnborough. In that promotion-winning season of 2010-11, Braintree drew 661 per game, and their support increased even more in their first season in the 5th tier, when they drew 901 per game and finished a rather decent 12th-place. The next season, 2012-13, Braintree finished in 9th place. The next season, 2013-14, Braintree drew an all-time high of 994 per game, and the team finished in 6th, just 4 points off the play-offs. The next season of 2014-15 saw Braintree Town slip down to 14th place. But the following season of 2015-16 saw Braintree qualify for the 5th division play-offs by finishing in 3rd place (losing in the semifinals to eventual promotion-winners Grimsby Town). This play-off-qualifying run in 2015-16 was when the Cowley brothers were running the Braintree squad. (Manager Danny Cowley and his brother Nick [1st team coach] were at the helm at Braintree for one season, then moved on in the summer of 2016 to Lincoln, and then the Cowley brothers got Lincoln City promoted to the Football League in 2017.) However, 2016-17 was disastrous for Braintree Town, and the team obviously felt a void after the departure of the Cowleys; under manager Hakan Hayrettin, Braintree were relegated on the last day of the 2016-17 National League season, dropping back down to the 6th tier. Heyrettin left by mutual consent and Brad Quinton was hired as the new Braintree manager in May 2017. Brad Quinton, who is Braintree Town’s all-time appearances record holder, had been manager at 7th-division-side Enfield Town for 3 years before taking the reins at Braintree. Quinton was an integral part of the 2010-11 Braintree squad that won automatic promotion to the 5th division. Quinton had played as a DMF for Braintree Town for 12 seasons, making 546 appearances (and scoring 69 goals).

Back down in the 6th tier in 2017-18, Braintree Town qualified for the National League South play-offs thanks to a solid final 10 matches (6-wins/3-draws-1-loss). But Braintree finished in 6th, meaning they would have to play the new extra elimination round in the play-offs, and they would have to play away the whole way. Braintree beat Hemel Hempstead away 0-0/3-2 on penalties in the eliminator. Then Braintree beat Dartford away 0-1 in the semifinal, with the winning goal by Braintree MF Billy Crook (who made the Team of the Year/see photo and caption below). And then in the final, Braintree beat Hampton Richmond Borough away 1-1/3-2 on penalties. The equalizing goal that forced extra time and penalties was scored by MF Reece Grant (see photos and captions below). And so Brad Qunton’s Braintree Town were back in the 5th division. Braintree Town drew 524 per game in 2017-18. They return to the National League/5th division as one of the smallest clubs…they drew lower last season than every other club that are in the 2018/19 National League, and of the whole 5th division in 2018-19, only Boreham Wood (who drew an all-time high of 626 per game in 2017-18), are arguably a smaller club than Braintree Town.

Braintree Town bounces straight back to the 5th division.
braintree-town_promoted-2018_cressing-road_bradley-quinton_billy-crook_reece-grant_marc-anthony-okoye_b_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 17/18 Braintree Town jersey, photo from andreascartersports.co.uk. Main Stand at Cressing Road, photo by phildanmatt.weebly.com/braintree. Shot looking towrds pitch at Cressing Road, photo by Russell Cox at footygrounds.blogspot.com/[July 2011/Cressing Road]. Panorama shot of Cressing Road by phildanmatt.weebly.com/braintree. Billy Crook, photo by John Weaver at eadt.co.uk/sport. Brad Quinton, photo by Chris Jarvis at braintreeandwithamtimes.co.uk/sport. Traveling Braintree fans at Hampton & Richmond Borough for the National League South play-off final, photo by thegrassrootstourist.com/[vanarama-national-league-south-promotion-final]. Reece Wright scoring and celebrating (3 photos) by thegrassrootstourist.com/[vanarama-national-league-south-promotion-final]. Reece Wright celebrating [inset photo], by Jon Weaver at braintreeandwithamtimes.co.uk/sport. Braintree players and supporters celebrating promotion; Manager Quinton and captain Marc-Anthony Okoye celebrating Braintree Town’s promotion: 2 photos by thegrassrootstourist.com/[vanarama-national-league-south-promotion-final].

___

-Thanks to the contributors at National League (English football) (en.wikipedia.org).
-Havant & Waterlooville 16/17 attendance from nonleaguematters.co.uk.
-Thanks to Nilfanion…Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org). Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.

-Thanks to Soccerway for upper-division-Non-League attendance figures, us.soccerway.com/national/england/conference-national.

June 25, 2018

The 6th division in England: 2018-19 [Non-League] National League North & National League South (2 separate 22-team leagues, at the same level) – maps, with 17/18-attendances-&-finishes chart./ + The top 16 drawing clubs in the 6th tier (chart showing all clubs in the 6th division that drew above 1,000 per game in 2017-18).

Main map – 2018-19 National Leagues North and South (44 teams/2 leagues) – click on image below

2018-19_national-league-north-and-south_the-6th-level_2-leagues-44-teams_w-2018-attendances-and-finishes_map_post_c_.gif
Main map – 2018-19 National Leagues North and South (44 teams/2 leagues)




By Bill Turianski on 25 June 2018; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-National League (English football) (en.wikipedia.org).
-Official site…thenationalleague.org.uk
-Nuneaton Town changes name back to Nuneaton Borough…ANNOUNCEMENT: Back to the Borough (pitchero.com/clubs/nuneatontownfc).
-Bradford Park Avenue changes name back to Bradford (Park Avenue) AFC…Club To Revert Back To Historic Name And Badge (bpafc.com).

-FA chiefs restructure non-league game [below the 6th level] (bbc.com/sport/football).
-Non-League allocations for 2018-19 Steps 1-4 (ie, levels 5-9) [pdf] (thefa.com).

    6th division England:
    2018-19 National League North & National League South
    (2 separate 22-team leagues, at the same level)

The 6th level in English football is where the regionalised leagues begin. Above is the 5th division, the National League, which is the highest level of non-League football and the only non-League level that is nationalised. The 6th level has two leagues: the National League North and the National League South. Below that is the 7th level, which used to be comprised of 3 leagues, but starting now [2018-19] there will be 4 leagues in the 7th level (the new league in the 7th level will be the result of splitting the Southern League into two leagues: the Southern League – Central and the Southern League – South) {see link to article at BBC/sports above; also see pdf above, which shows the whole set-up in chart form}.

A brief history of the 5th and 6th tiers in England…
1979-80: 5th level of English football instituted with the Alliance Premier League: the 5th level and the highest level of non-League football in England (and Wales).
1986-87: Promotion/Relegation established between the 5th level and the 4th Division of the Football League.
2004-05: The 6th level of football instituted, with the creation of 2 regional leagues below the 5th level: the Conference North & the Conference South (22 teams in each league).
2015-16: names of the three leagues changed to…5th level: National League / 6th level: National League North & National League South.

The map(s)…
Above is the two leagues combined on one map (click on image at the top of the post for all 44 teams in the 2018-19 National Leagues North & South)…
Below is a map each for: the 2018-19 National League North, and the 2018-19 National League South. All the maps are location-maps which also show each club’s 2017-18 home average attendance as well as their 2017-18 league finish (with play-off bids and promotion/relegation noted).

There is also a small chart further below, which shows the 16 clubs in the 2018-19 6th level that drew above 1,000-per-game last season [in 2017-18] (11 clubs in the 18/19 NL North / 5 clubs in the 18/19 NL South). Then I wrote a few words about each of the sixteen 6th-tier clubs that drew above 1,000 per game last season.

My next post will be a map of the 2018-19 National League [the 5th division], with illustrated profiles of the 4 promoted clubs (Salford City, Harrogate Town, Havant & Waterlooville, Braintree Town). That will be posted on the 11th of July 2018.

Map of National League North (2018-19 season, with attendances and finishes from 2017-18) – click on image below
2018-19_national-league-north_aka-conference-north_map_w-2018-attendances_post_b_.gif
National League North 18/19 map w/ 17/18 attendances and finishes

Map of National League South (2018-19 season, with attendances and finishes from 2017-18) – click on image below
2018-19_national-league-south_aka-conference-south_map_w-2018-attendances_post_d_.gif
National League South 18/19 map w/ 17/18 attendances and finishes

6th Level clubs which draw above 1,000-per-game (16 clubs: 11 in the National League North / 5 in the National League South)…
2018-19-national-leagues-north-and-south_all-clubs-that-drew-over-1-k-in-2017-18_16-clubs_m_.gif
Attendance figures from: nonleaguematters.co.uk.

Top draws in the 6th tier…

Stockport County: 99 seasons in the Football League (last in 2010-11). Financial problems have plagued the club since the early 2000s, and that led it to being a supporter-owned club for a while circa 2005-10. Stockport were in the 2nd division as recently as 2001-02. They were drawing between 6-to-8-K back then. But though they have fallen a ways since then (4 relegations), Stockport County can still draw above 3 K despite being stuck in the 6th tier (and in 17/18 they drew 3.4 K for the second-straight season). Stockport will be playing their 6th season of 6th-division football in 2018-19. Stockport, population 136,000 {2011 census}, was historically part of Cheshire, but now is in Greater Manchester. As the crow flies, Stockport is about 7 miles south of central Manchester. Stockport County wear Blue-and-White, but last season they wore pale-royal-blue-with-navy-blue-and-white-trim. Stockport County play at Edgeley Park, which has a 10.8-K-capacity (all seated).

York City: 72 seasons in the Football League (last in 2015-16). Back-to-back relegations have devastated the North-Yorkshire-based club. But most of their supporters have not abandoned them…York were drawing 3.2 K in their last Football League season (2015-16), and have only dropped off about .5 K (down 14%) since then. York drew 2.7 K last season, as they were relegated to the 6th tier for the first time. York City wear unique Red jerseys with Dark-Blue sleeves, and play at Boothan Crescent (cap. 8, 256).

Hereford: Phoenix-club of Hereford United (1924-2014). They still play at Edgar Street (though one stand behind the goal failed the safety inspection). The 4-year-old re-formed club has been marching up the pyramid, with 3 straight league-winning promotions. And their support has been outstanding. In their inaugural season, Hereford drew an astounding 2.8 K in the 9th-level Midlands League (in 2015-16). Then in 16/17, the Bulls drew 2.8 K again (in the 8th tier, winning the South League South & West by 18 points). Their support tailed off a little last season (maybe because they clinched the league title again with such ease). Hereford drew 2.5 K and won the Southern League by 13 points. And Hereford drew about 1.7-K-per-game more than anyone else in the Southern League last season. Hereford make their 6th-level debut, now situated in the National League North. Hereford will probably will be one of the favorites for promotion (again). Like the original club, Hereford wear White-with-Black.

FC United of Manchester: Supporter-owned club. Protest-club formed in 2005, after the cynical debt-laden leveraged-buyout of Manchester United by the Glazers. FC United started off with three consecutive promotions (2006-08). The club won promotion to the 6th tier in April 2015, and a month later, in May 2015, FC United moved into their nice and functional purpose-built Broadhurst Park (cap. 4,400). But factional unrest within the club has hurt them in the past couple of years. Attendance has fallen 1.2 K in two seasons (down from 3.3 K in 15/16, to 2.1 K in 17/18). And their promotion campaign has stalled (this will be FCUM’s 4th season in the 6th tier). Like Man Utd, FC United wear Red-and-White-with-Black.

Woking: The Surrey-based club is nicknamed the Cards (as in the Cardinal red in their Red-and-White halved jerseys). Woking have never been higher than the 5th division, and were a mainstay there fifteen years ago (Woking played 17 straight seasons in the 5th tier from 1992-93 to 2008-09). But this is now their second spell in the 6th tier after 3 seasons up in the 5th. Woking draw solid (2.2 K last season), and will probably still draw above 1 K back in the 6th tier (they drew between 1.1 and 1.8 K in their 3 season-spell in the 6th tier from 2010-12).

Chester: Phoenix-club of Chester City (1985-2010). Located in western Cheshire right on the border of Wales. Like the club they replaced, Chester play at the Deva Stadium (cap. 5,400 with 4 K seated). (The Deva Stadium is actually partially located in Wales.) Like FC United of Manchester, and also like Hereford, Chester began life (in 2010-11) with three straight promotion-winning seasons. That got them to the 5th tier, but then Chester stalled out after 4 seasons in the 5th division, and now find themselves back in the 6th tier. Crowds have diminished, somewhat alarmingly (down almost .9 K in 6 years, from 2.7 K in the promotion-winning season of 2011-12, to 1.8 K last season). Chester wear Blue-and-White.

Torquay United: 78 seasons in the Football League (last in 2013-14). Torquay are located on the south-west coast, in Devon. Torquay have now suffered two relegations in 5 seasons. The first time they were stuck in non-League, they escaped back to the Football League after just 2 seasons. That was in 2008-09. Then followed 5 seasons in the 4th division, and Torquay were good enough to make the play-offs twice in that 5-year stint, even making it to the League Two play-off final in 2011 (losing to Stevenage). But now the Gulls are moving out of the 5th division in the wrong direction. In 6 seasons, Torquay have lost 40% of their fanbase, going from 2.8 K in League Two in their 2011-12 play-off run, to 1.7 K last season when they were relegated. Torquay wear Yellow-and-Navy-Blue.

Kidderminster Harriers: 5 seasons in the Football League (last in 2004-05). Kidderminster is a town of 55,000 located just south of the West Midlands, in north Worcestershire, 17 miles (27 km) south-west of Birmingham city centre. Robert Plant (of Led Zeppelin fame) grew up here. In 2000-01, Kidderminster drew an all-time high of 3.4 K. That was the season of their Football League debut. The dream lasted 5 seasons. Back in non-League 5 years later, Kidderminster were drawing above-or-near 2 K most seasons. Kidderminster drew 1.6 K last season and are now entering their 3rd season in the 6th tier. Kiddy wear Red-with-Black-and-White.

Darlington: 81 seasons in the Football League (last in 2009-10). Saddled by the White Elephant that was the 25-K-capacity Darlington Stadium, Darlington were a financial mess by the time they were relegated out of the 4th division in April 2010. Darlington were drawing 1.9 K and playing in a 25.5-K-arena. Of course it was going to end badly. Two years later, in 2012, Darlington were expelled from the Conference National [the 5th division]. The Phoenix-club Darlington 1883 rose in its place…‘A new club was immediately formed but The Football Association ruled that, as a new club, it must have a different playing name from the expelled club. The name chosen was Darlington 1883, and that club was placed in the Northern League Division One, the ninth tier of English football, for the 2012–13 season. They won three promotions in four seasons before the FA approved their request to change to the traditional Darlington FC name.’ {-excerpt from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darlington_F.C..} Darlington are from County Durham. The town of Darlington has a population of around 92,000 and is located 37 miles by road S of Newcastle, and about 4 miles north of the border with North Yorkshire. Darlington wear sharp-looking Black-and-White hoops, and are nicknamed the Quakers. They drew 1.2 K when they won the Northern League (7th tier) in 2015-16. Darlington were a mid-table side that drew 1.4 K last season, but that was a let-down from their strong run 2 years ago (2016-17), when they drew 1.7 K and finished in 5th (but Darlington 1883 were barred from the play-offs due to failing ground size regulations). Still, it looks like Darlington are going in the right direction. Especially because they have been playing back in town since 2016-17, at the 3,000-capacity Blackwell Meadow, which they rent from rugby league side Darlington RFC.

Dulwich Hamlet: Despite being rendered homeless by soulless corporate landlords, Dulwich Hamlet won promotion into the 6th tier, by winning the Isthmian play-off final (beating Hendon 1-1/4-3 on penalties). The Pink-and-Navy-Blue-clad Dulwich Hamlet are from South London, in the London Borough of Southwark. (Dulwich Hamlet attract a fanbase that has been derided as hipster. Oh, so a lot of them have beards and like artisanal products, whatever, more power to them; they’re from the largest city in the UK and yet they are still supporting lower non-League football, and that is good enough for me.) For three years the club has been drawing impressively for a 7th-tier side. They drew 1.0 K in 2015-16, and then in ’16-17 and ’17-18, Dulwich Hamlet drew 1.3 K (in a division where the median average attendance is only about 250). But last season, as the squad chased promotion, their eviction from their Champion Field ground diminished their crowd-size considerably. In March and April 2018, once they were forced to play at Tooting & Micham’s Imperial Field (located 5 miles away, further south-west, in SW London), Dulwich Hamlet started seeing smaller crowds: like 800 or so, instead of the 1,300 or so they were drawing earlier that season. And so it is going to be interesting to see, in 2018-19, how Dulwich Hamlet do, as a new 6th-division-side that also happens to be homeless.

AFC Telford United: Phoenix-club of Telford United (1872-2004). Telford United were a founding member of the 5th division (Alliance Premier League) in 1979. AFC Telford Utd play at the 6,300-capacity New Bucks Head (opened 2003), which was originally built for Telford United to play at before they went bankrupt. Telford United was a mainstay of the 5th tier back in the 1990s, but never played above the 5th division. The re-formed club has had a harder time surviving in the 5th tier. Although AFC Telford United have been drawing above 1 K, most seasons, for many years now, they have become more of a 5th-division/6th-division yo-yo club, with their most recent relegation in 2014-15. Nicknamed the Lilywhites or the Bucks, Telford wear White with navy and red trim, and now they wear Navy Blue pants (previously black). Telford, located in Shropshire, is somewhat of a commuter-town of Birminghmam. Telford is on the large side for a non-League town: its population is around 142,000 {2011 census figure}.

Billericay Town: Controversial owner Glenn Tamplin is widely disliked, with appalling behavior towards one of his players and towards rival fans on social media. Tamplin also fired the manager, took the manager’s job for himself, then fired himself, then when he couldn’t find another manager, he re-instated himself. But despite all this, the club has just been promoted to the 6th tier for the first time. Billericay Town got there with a huge wage bill that included former-Premier-League talent. Attendance has shot up almost 500, from 565 per game two years ago, to 1,057 last season, when Billericay won the Isthmian League by 4 points over Dulwich Hamlet. Billericay, Essex, with a population of around 28,000, is a commuter town that is located, by road, 34 miles (55 km) E of central London. Billericay Town wear all-Blue (dark Cornflower blue).

Boston United: 5 seasons in the Football League (last in 2006-07). Boston got into the Football League on tainted circumstances in 2002 (violation of registration rules), and after 5 seasons in the 4th division, they were relegated back to non-League. And at that point, the club was in such poor financial shape that they were demoted further down an extra level, down to the 6th tier. And Boston United has basically never recovered from that. Boston is in Lincolnshire; the town of Boston has a population of around 35,000. Boston United are nicknamed the Pilgrims, and wear Amber-and Black.

Dartford: Dartford are from Dartford, Kent. The town of Dartford is home to the Dartford Crossing, the easternmost transit over the River Thames. Dartford FC play at the marvelous Princes Park, a singular ground that is environmentally-friendly and is built primarily of wood and has a living green-roof over the clubhouse. Princes Park opened in November 2006, and has a capacity of 4,100 (642 seated). The new and unique ground greatly improved the club’s crowd-size (crowds went from the mid-200s to over 800), and helped propel them to promotion to the 7th division in 2008, and then into the 6th division in 2010, and then into the 5th division in 2012. In their promotion-winning season of 2011-12, Dartford drew 1.2 K. And in their first season in the 5th tier they drew an all-time high of 1.3 K. Dartford had a three-season-spell in the 5th tier (2012-15). Back in the 6th tier, Dartford are still drawing above 1 K, but only slightly (in 2017-18, Dartford drew 1,023). In 2017-18, Dartford just missed out on promotion, winning their last 9 games chasing Havant & Waterlooville, only to be denied automatic promotion by goal-difference. Then in the 2018 National League South play-offs, Dartford lost to the eventually-promoted Braintree Town. Dartford will probably be one of the favorites to win promotion in 2018-19. Dartford wear White-with-Black.

Southport: 50 seasons in the Football League (last in 1977-78). Southport was the last club to leave the Football League through the re-election process [automatic relegation from the Fourth Division was instituted in 1986–87]. Since then, Southport have played 19 seasons in the 5th tier, within three different spells; their last season in the 5th tier was in 2016-17. Southport have been drawing above 1 K most seasons since 1992-93. The town of Southport is part of Merseyside, and is a coastal bedroom community just north of Liverpool. Southport play at York Street, which opened in 1923 and has a capacity of 6,643 (1,826 seated). Southport are nicknamed the Sandgrounders, for the town’s sandy beach promenade, and they wear Yellow-with-Black.
___

Thanks to all at the links below…
-Thanks to the contributors at National League (English football) (en.wikipedia.org).
-Thanks to Nilfanion at Wikipedia…Blank map of UK historic counties, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:United Kingdom police areas map.svg (commons.wikimedia.org). Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg. Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).

Photos/Images of kit badges…
[Ashton Utd 17/18 jersey badge], ashtonunitedfc.gr8sports.co.uk
[Curzon Ashton 17/18 jersey badge], twitter.com/[@curzonashton].
[Chester 17/18 jersey badge], chesterfc.com/all-ticket.
[Nuneaton 18/19 kit (image of lighter-blue-fade-striping behind the badge)], twitter.com/[@Official_NTFC]
[Spennymoor 14/15 jersey badge], oldfootballshirts.com.
[Billericay], billericaytownfc.co.uk/product/2017-18-home-shirt-2.
[Chippenham], pitchero.com/clubs/chippenhamtown.
[Dulwich Hamlet], pitchero.com/clubs/dulwichhamlet/.
[Eastbourne (script on badge)], ebfc.co.uk/news.

-Thanks to the Non-League Matters site for non-League attendance figures, nonleaguematters.co.uk.

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress