billsportsmaps.com

March 4, 2021

Netherlands: 2020-21 Eredivisie – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & Dutch professional titles list.

Filed under: Netherlands — admin @ 10:35 pm

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Netherlands: 2020-21 Eredivisie – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & All-time Dutch titles list



By Bill Turianski on the 4th of March 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Summary – Eredivisie – Netherlands – results, fixtures, tables, stats, etc (soccerway.com).
-2020-21 Eredivisie (en.wikipedia.org).

The map shows the 18 clubs in the 2020-21 Eredivisie, the top-flight of the Netherlands. The Eredivisie was founded in 1956, two years after the introduction of professionalism in the Netherlands. That makes this the 65th season of the competition. There was no champion last season, because the competition was abandoned due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 2018-19 champions were Ajax of Amsterdam – the most successful Dutch club – and Ajax are on course to win the title again, with a 6-point lead as of the 5th of March (with 11 or 12 games to be played).

At the right-hand side of the map-page are two charts. The top chart shows the Seasons-in-1st-division for the current clubs. Also listed are the consecutive seasons each club has currently spent in the top-flight. Longest serving clubs are the big 3 of the Netherlands – Ajax (of Amsterdam) Feyenoord (of Rotterdam), and PSV (of Eindhoven). All 3 were founding members of the Eredivisie, and all 3 have never been relegated. The second chart is the all-time pro titles list for the Netherlands. As mentioned, the Eredivisie was established two years after Dutch clubs could turn pro. So I have included the winners of the final two 48-team Dutch National Championships, in 1954-55 (winner: Willem II) and 1955-56 (winner: Rapid JC).

The map itself includes the 12 provinces and 14 largest cities of the Netherlands. At the foot of the map, the populations of those 14 largest Dutch cities are listed (with the provinces they are located in). Finally, I added all the major rivers and waterways of the Netherlands, including the main canals.




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Thanks to Lencer at en.wikipedia.org, for the blank map of Netherlands, File:Netherlands location map.svg.
Thanks to the contributors at Eredivisie (en.wikipedia.org).

February 23, 2021

2021 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 47-team tournament, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed). With a description of the 2 qualifying-spots (from Uruguay) and the 5 placements (from Brazil) yet to be determined.

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 9:10 am

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2021 Copa Libertadores: location-map for the 47-team tournament, with Club Histories (Libertadores appearances & titles listed)



By Bill Turianski on the 23rd of February 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2021 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Summary: results, fixtures, standings (flashscore.co.uk).
-espn.com/[libertadores]
-Schedule: 2021 Copa Libertadores schedule.

-Copa Libertadores: Long road ahead for minnows like Guarani, Uruguay’s Liverpool (by Tim Vickery on 22 Feb 2021 at espn.com)

Updated on Friday 26 2021 (see Brazil qualified teams segment 2 paragraphs below)…

The 2021 Copa Libertadores Preliminaries start on 23 and 24 February. (The Group Stage will start on 16 April.) As I did last year, I will post an updated map for the Group Stage, around the 12th of April; then I will post a map/chart for the the Final Stages when the Round of 16 starts, around the middle of July. Of course, that is all subject to change (as it was last season…due to the COVID pandemic).

    2020 Copa Libertadores…the 62nd edition of South America’s most prestigious fútbol competition.

Shown on the map are 45 of the 47 teams that have qualified for the 2021 Libertadores.
Due to scheduling problems related to the COVID-19 pandemic, one country – Uruguay – has 2 qualification-spots yet to be determined, and one country – Brazil – has 5 seeding-spots yet to be determined. In Brazil, all 8 teams to qualify HAVE been determined, and three of those spots are for certain…Definitely qualified and placed are 3 teams: the #1-spot Palmeiras (as Cup Holders), the #2-spot Flamengo (as Brasileiro champions), and the #8-spot Santos (8th-place in 2020 Brasieiro). So in Brazil, it is only a matter of sorting out the other 5 qualified teams. And that will not be sorted out until after the 2020 Copa do Brasil finals/second match is played on Sunday the 7th of March.

The Copa do Brasil finals pits Palmeiras v Grêmio, but Palmeiras have the #1-spot in Brazil (as Cup-Holder), so the spot here goes to either Grêmio (as Copa do Brasil winner), or, if Grêmio loses, the #4 #5 and #6-spots will all move up a notch, and Grêmio will have to take the #7-spot. The 5 teams from Brazil that have qualified but have not yet been placed in spots are: Internacional, Atlético Mineiro, São Paulo, Fluminense, Grêmio. It boils down to this: no one wanted the #7-spot, because it means that the team must play in the preliminaries, and now it is only a question of whether Fluminense or Grêmio gets stuck playing in the second-stage preliminaries.

The teams-chart on the map-page for Brazil will be updated accordingly, on the 8th of March. As it stands right now, I have the teams arranged in the spots with the standings as of Friday the 26th of February.

The spots in Brazil…
-#1-spot will go to 2020 Copa Libertadores champions Palmeiras (Cup Holders).
-#2-spot goes to 2020 Brasileiro champions, Flamengo.
-#3-spot (Copa Brasil winner): finalist Palmeiras already has the #1-spot, so the spot here goes to either finalist Grêmio, or the #4- #5- and #6-spots below will all move up a notch, and Grêmio will have to take the #7-spot.
-#4-spot (2nd-place in 2020 Brasileiro): either Internacional or Atlético Mineiro.
-#5-spot, (3rd-place in 2020 Brasileiro): either Atlético Mineiro or São Paulo.
-#6-spot (4th-place in 2020 Brasileiro): either Fluminense or Grêmio.
-#7-spot [a preliminary/2nd-stage spot] (5th-or-6th-place in 2020 Brasileiro): either São Paulo or Fluminense or Grêmio.
-#8-spot [a preliminary/2nd-stage spot] (8th-place in 2020 Brasileiro): will definitely be Santos.




The spots in Uruguay… {Uruguay 2020 aggregate table}
#1-spot (Best in aggregate table): most likely Nacional (who have a 6-and-7-point lead on the two chasing teams of Montevideo City Torque, and Peñarol). (In case you are wondering, Montevideo City is a Uruguayan top-flight-newcomer that is owned by the Manchester City owner-group, and have never qualified for the Copa Libertadores.)
#2-spot (2nd-best in aggregate table): most likely either Montevideo City or Peñarol. Both these teams refused the #4-spot or the #3-spot [ie, the much-less-coveted preliminary-rounds spots], so one of these two may well miss out on the Libertadores despite having a better aggregate record than the teams that have accepted the #3-spot (Montevideo Wanderers) and the #4-spot (Liverpool of Montevideo).

The map, and the teams-chart, for Uruguay will be updated accordingly, on the 12th of April.
But by that time I will have posted another whole new map, of the 2021 Libertadores Group Stage.

This map includes the preliminary-stage teams: there are 19 preliminary-stage teams…and only four of those 19 teams will advance to the Group Stage. (Note: the 19 preliminary clubs are shown in italics, on the teams-by-country lists.)

Qualified teams by country:
Brazil has 8 teams (7+ Copa Libertadores holder).
Argentina has 7 teams (6+ Copa Sudamericana holder).
The eight other countries all have 4 teams each, in the tournament (Uruguay, Colombia, Paraguay, Ecuador, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela).

(Note: Copa Libertadores winner of the 2020 tournament was Palmeiras, of São Paulo, Brazil. Copa Sudamericana winner of the 2020 tournament was Defensa y Justicia, of Florencio Varela in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina.)

One other note:
This is the first time I have listed, on the map, the city-location of every qualified team. Also, for the first time, I have included an inset map. The inset map is of Greater Buenos Aires. I included this because all 7 qualified teams from Argentina are from either Buenos Aires (5 teams), or from Greater Buenos Aires (2 teams). This is unprecedented.



___
Thanks to all at the links below
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-Blank map of Greater Buenos Aires, by NordNordWest at File:Argentina Greater Buenos Aires location map.svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-2021 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2019 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

February 9, 2021

France: 2020-21 Ligue 1 – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & All-time French titles list.

Filed under: France — admin @ 9:12 pm

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France: 2020-21 Ligue 1 – Location-map, with 2 charts: Seasons-in-1st-Division (current clubs) & All-time French professional titles list




By Bill Turianski on the 9th of February 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2020–21 Ligue 1 (en.wikipedia.org).
-Ligue 1 – Summary: matches, table, players, etc. (soccerway.com).
-Get French Football…your home of French football in English (getfootballnewsfrance.com).
-Football en France: Histoire, stats et classement sur la Ligue 1 (pari-et-gagne.com). [Recommended.]

The map shows the twenty clubs in the current season of the French Ligue 1 [2020-21].
The map features the locations and crests of the 20 current Ligue Un clubs, along with the 10 largest French cities, and the 13 Regions of Metropolitan France (aka European France). {Largest French cities’ metropolitan area populations from 2016 census, here}. The major French rivers are also shown {see further below, at the foot of this post, for more on that}.

Plus, there are two charts on the right-hand side of the map page….
One chart shows Seasons-in-1st-Division [current clubs]. (2020-21 is the 83rd season of Ligue 1.) Marseille has spent the longest in the French top flight, with 71 seasons. Second-most seasons in the French top flight goes to two clubs – Saint-Étienne, and Bordeaux – both with 68 seasons. Also shown on the chart are the consecutive seasons each club has currently spent in the top tier. Reigning champions PSG are the current longest-serving member of Ligue 1, with 47 straight seasons; second-longest top-flight tenure belongs to Lyon, with 32 straight seasons.

The second chart is the All-time French titles list. Saint-Étienne have won the most French titles: 10. But Saint-Étienne’s last title came 40 seasons ago, in 1981. Two clubs have the second-most titles – Marseille, and PSG – with 9. Marseille last won it in 2010. Paris Saint-Germain, as mentioned, are the reigning champions, and are by far the most wealthy club in the country, to the point of making a mockery of any notion of a balanced competition. (PSG is owned by a subsidiary of the slave-owning Gulf state Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund.) And PSG have been champions for 7 of the last 8 seasons, and for the last 3 straight seasons.

But PSG might not win the title this season.
Because both Lille and Lyon sit above PSG in the table, currently [9 February 2020]. So the neutral fan is left with the appealing prospect of an actual title race in France right now. Lille has won 6 straight, and seized first place on the last day of January, when PSG stumbled against relegation-threatened Lorient. Meanwhile, Lyon has been at or near the top all season, and beat PSG away, in mid-December. Here are some crucial title-race fixtures…Sunday the 21st of March: Lyon v PSG. Saturday the 3rd of April: PSG v Lille. Saturday the 24th of April: Lyon v Lille.

Here is a recent article on current league-leaders Lille, from the Guardian/football site…Lille were Ligue 1 title contenders. Now they look like the favourites (by Adam White and Eric Devin on 4 Feb 2021 at theguardian.com/football).




Major Rivers in France
Since I could not find a suitable blank map of France which featured major rivers, I drew in the rivers on the map here myself, using a variety of sources. I took extra care in plotting the rivers through the two largest French cities of Paris and Lyon. The 10 longest rivers in France are shown, and are listed at the foot of the map. Due to conflicting interpretations of river-lengths, I could not find a definitive list of the longest rivers in France online, except for the Google-search result of that {here/see the 10 images across the top of the search-result}. I then confirmed the numbers, using both Wikipedia and the online Encyclopædia Britannica, and a few other sources. Below, I have reproduced the text at the foot of the map…

Longest Rivers in France
1. Rhine (1,230 km/760 mi): rises in the Swiss Alps in eastern Switzerland. Flows through Switzerland, Leichtenstein, Austria, Germany, France & Netherlands. Empties into the North Sea, near Rotterdam, Netherlands.

2. Loire (1,006 km/629 mi): rises in the SE Massif Centrale. Longest river wholly in France. It flows north to Orléans, then swings west. Empties into the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean), near Nantes.

3. Meuse (925 km/575 mi): flows through NE France, Belgium & Netherlands. Drains into the North Sea via the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta in southern Netherlands.

4. Rhône (813 km/575 mi): rises in the Rhône Glacier in the southern Swiss Alps. Flows through Switzerland & SE France, passing through Lyon. Empties into the Mediterranean Sea near Marseille.

5. Seine (775 km/482 mi): rises at Source-Seine, 30 km (19 mi) NW of Dijon. Flows generally north-west, passing through the capital, Paris. Empties into the English Channel at Le Havre.

6. Moselle (545 km/339 mi): a left-bank tributary of the Rhine that flows through NE France, Luxembourg and western Germany. It joins the Rhine at Koblenz, Germany.

7. Garrone (529 km/329 mi): rises in the Spanish Pyrenees. Flows through northern Spain and SW France, passing through Toulouse. Empties into the Gironde estuary at Bordeaux.

8. Marne (514 km/319 mi): a right-bank tributary of the Seine. It runs north, and then bends west, and joins the Seine 6 km (4 mi) S of central Paris, at Charenton-le-Pont.

9. Lot (485 km/301 mi): a right-bank tributary of the Garonne that rises in the southern Massif Centrale. It joins the Garonne 95 km (59 mi) SE of Bordeaux, at Aiguillon.

10. Dordogne (483 km/300 mi): rises on the flanks of the Puy de Sancy (the highest point in the the Massif Centrale). Flows west to join the Gironde estuary just north of Bordeaux.



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Thanks to all at the links below…
-Blank map of France by Superbenjamin at File:France location map-Regions and departements-2016.svg (en.wikipedia.org).
-Seasons-in-1st-division data, from pari-et-gagne.com/[Bilan historique Ligue 1].
-Longest rivers in France, from worldatlas.com/[longest-rivers-in-france].
-Largest French cities (2016 census figures of metropolitan-areas), from insee.fr via en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_area_(France)#List_of_France’s_aires_urbaines_(metropolitan_areas).
-2020–21 Ligue 1 (en.wikipedia.org and fr.wikipedia.org).

January 31, 2021

American Football League: 1963 AFL season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders + attendances. Champions: San Diego Chargers.

Filed under: AFL (gridiron football),AFL, 1963 map/season,Retro maps — admin @ 7:06 pm

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American Football League: 1963 AFL season, map with helmets/jerseys & final standings + offensive stats leaders; champions: San Diego Chargers



By Bill Turianski on the 31st of January 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-1963 AFL season;
-1963 AFL Championship Game (en.wikipedia.org).
-1963 AFL season (pro-football-reference.com).
-1963 AFL uniforms (gridiron-uniforms.com).

The map… The map shows the primary helmets and jerseys worn by the 8 teams in the 1963 AFL, the fourth season of the American Football League. Also shown on the map page are the final standings of the 1963 AFL season, the Offensive leaders of the 1963 AFL season, and the average attendances of the 1963 AFL season (compared to the previous season).

    Changes in AFL franchises in 1963. One team moved to new city and changed their name (Kansas City Chiefs); one team changed their name (New York Jets). Both these revamped franchises became instrumental in the ultimate success of the AFL, in its battle with the NFL…

-Kansas City Chiefs, est. 1963…Right after winning the 1962 AFL title, the Dallas Texans (AFL, 1960-62) moved 453 miles (731 km) north, to Kansas City, Missouri. The franchise did this to avoid the situation in Dallas, Texas, where the team was competing with the much-stronger NFL in the form of the Dallas Cowboys. It was becoming obvious to owner-and-AFL-cofounder Lamar Hunt that the Dallas Texans were going to lose the battle for fans and ticket-support, there in Dallas, Texas. So the team moved to Kansas City, Missouri, and became the Kansas City Chiefs. Three years later, in the 1966 AFL season, the Kansas City Chiefs would play in the first Super Bowl (losing heavily to the NFL’s Green Bay Packers). Six years later, in the 1969 AFL season, the Kansas City Chiefs would upset the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings to win the fourth and final meeting between the AFL and NFL champions, in Super Bowl IV [4]. The 10-team AFL and the 16-team NFL would then merge for the 1970 season to form a 26-team NFL.
kansas-city-chiefs_afl-1963-move_from_dallas-texas_to_kansas-city-missouri_map-with-helmets-and-logos_-_b_.gif
Image credits above – Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org). Helmet illustrations by The Gridiron Uniforms Database at gridiron-uniforms.com.




-New York Jets, est. 1963…The hapless and broke and bankrupt New York Titans AFL franchise was bought by a much deeper-pocketed consortium, headed by entertainment executive Sonny Werblin. The team changed its name to the New York Jets. The team also changed their colors – from navy-blue & yellow-gold, to green & white. Werblin’s first order of business was to sign as head coach and GM the former Baltimore Colts title-winning head coach Weeb Ewbank, who said “I don’t see why we can’t build a winner here in five years.” The franchise finally was able to set in motion their plans to move out of the decrepit and soon-to-be-demolished Polo Grounds (on the tip of northern Manhattan, NYC), and into the new multi-purpose stadium being built by the government of New York City, in Queens, NYC. The move to the new venue would happen the following season of 1964, and attendance would skyrocket. The Jets’ improved on-field record coincided with their huge attendance increase at Shea Stadium, there in Queens, with QB Joe Namath at the helm. Five years after the name-change from the Titans to the Jets, in the 1968 season, the Jets were AFL champions. And so the AFL’s New York Jets then faced the NFL’s Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III [3]. The hugely-favored Colts were beaten by the Jets, in one of the biggest upsets in pro football history, thereby signifying to the American public that the AFL had arrived, and was the equal of the NFL. Two seasons later (in 1970), the two leagues would merge.

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Image credits above – Helmet illustrations by The Gridiron Uniforms Database at gridiron-uniforms.com.

AFL attendances in 1963

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Source for attendance figures: pdf at ProFootballResearchers.org [Coffin Corner newsletter, Sept 1991, by Bob Carroll], profootballresearchers.org/archives/Website_Files/Coffin_Corner/13-04-430.pdf. Helmet illustrations from gridiron-uniforms.com.

Average Attendance, NFL vs. AFL (the 10 years they were in competition: 1960-69); plus NFL/AFL/Super Bowl title-winners in the 1960s…
afl_vs_nfl_attendance_1960-69_title-winners_super-bowl_i-iv_winners_chart_h_.gif
Source for attendance figures: pdf at ProFootballResearchers.org [Coffin Corner newsletter, Sept 1991, by Bob Carroll], profootballresearchers.org/archives/Website_Files/Coffin_Corner/13-04-430.pdf. Helmet illustrations from gridiron-uniforms.com.



    1963 AFL champions – the San Diego Chargers

The San Diego Chargers were one of the strongest teams in the ten seasons of the AFL (1960-69). Yet although they made it to 5 AFL title games, the Chargers won only one of them – in 1963, when they blew out the Boston Patriots by 41 points.

It all came together for head coach Sid Gillman’s San Diego Chargers in 1963. 1962 had been a bust for the Chargers (who went an abysmal 4-10). But the team regrouped, after a boot-camp type atmosphere at their ’63 training camp, out in the high desert east of San Diego. Then the Chargers cruised through the 1963 regular season with the AFL’s best record (11-3), beating out the surprise Al Davis-led Oakland Raiders, by one game to win the Western Division. Led by the AFL’s 1963 MVP Tobin Rote (at QB), and future Hall-of-Famer WR Lance Alworth, the Chargers averaged 28.5 points per game, and were the highest-scoring offense in the league. And the tough Chargers defense allowed the least amount of points that year {1963 AFL standings}.

Then the Chargers caught a break. Because the Eastern Division had no clear dominant team, and the East was deadlocked at the top with two 7-6-1 teams. And so that meant that the East had to be decided by an extra playoff game (the AFL had no tiebreakers). And when the Boston Patriots beat the Buffalo Bills in that extra game, to advance to the 1963 AFL title game, the Patriots were depleted by the effort. So the Chargers entered the ’63 title game well rested, while the Patriots were anything but that.

Sid Gillman, renowned for his forward-thinking and pass-oriented “vertical offense”, decided to change things up for the 1963 title match. The Chargers had been beaten by a strong defense in the 1960 and 1961 AFL title games (both times losing to the Houston Oilers). With that in mind, Gillman drastically changed their plan of attack for the ’63 title game. Instead of deep routes to WR Lance Alworth, the Chargers would go with swing passes to FB Keith Lincoln. And instead of runs behind their future Hall of Fame OT Ron Mix, the Chargers would go with draws (to Lincoln and to HB Paul Lowe), and misdirection plays. In other words, Gillman was going with the opposite of what the Chargers had become known for.

By the time the Boston Patriots caught on to the Chargers’ game plan, the damage was done. Powered by long TD-runs by Keith Lincoln (for 67 yards) and Paul Lowe (for 58 yards), the Chargers shot out to a 21-7 lead after the 1st quarter. And the Chargers led by 31-10 at halftime. By the start of the 4th quarter, San Diego led by 28 points, and backup-QB John Hadl replaced Tobin Rote. 13 points later, the score was 51-10, and the Chargers were the new AFL champions.

MVP honors went to Keith Lincoln. Keith Lincoln was a QB out of Washington State, who had been drafted in the 5th round of the 1961 NFL draft by the Chicago Bears. But Lincoln, who grew up in southern California, decided to sign with the AFL’s San Diego Chargers instead. There he was converted to a running back. Lincoln had the game of a lifetime in the 1963 AFL title game, racking up an astounding 329 yards from scrimmage (206 yards rushing and 123 yards receiving). Plus he threw one pass for a 20-yard gain. The 329 yards from scrimmage that Keith Lincoln produced that day in San Diego has never been bested in a pro football title game, and is tied for 3rd-best all-time [NFL, 1920-2020; AFL, 1960-69]. {All-time best yards-from-scrimmage in a game (pro-football-reference.com/leaders).}

As of 2020, the Chargers have not won another title.

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Photo and Image credits above – Tobin Rote & Ron Mix in the 1963 AFL Championship Game, unattributed at pinterest.com. Keith Lincoln runs for a 67-yard TD in the 1963 AFL Championship Game, photo unattributed at profootballtalk.nbcsports.com. Paul Lowe runs for a 58-yard TD in the 1963 AFL Championship Game, photo by Charles Aqua Viva/Getty Images via boltsfromtheblue.com. Lance Alworth catching long pass in the 1963 AFL Championship Game, photo unattributed at goldenrankings.com/AFLchampionship1963. Keith Lincoln taking hand-off from backup-QB John Hadl, late in the 1963 AFL Championship Game, unattributed at pinterest.com. Keith Lincoln on sidelines [circa 1964], photo unattributed at alchetron.com. San Diego Chargers 1963 helmet, from helmet hut.com. Head coach Sid Gilman and the Chargers players and staff celebrate the teams first (and only) championship title, with a champagne toast, photo unattributed at goldenrankings.com/AFLchampionship1963.



San Diego Chargers on map page… 1963 Chargers’ offense in the huddle listening to QB Tobin Rote (#18), unattributed at pinterest.com. 1963 Chargers uniforms, illustrations by Gridiron Uniforms database at gridiron-uniforms.com/[1963-AFL]. Tobin Rote & Paul Lowe [photo from 1963 Sports Illustrated cover], photo by Walter Iooss, Jr./Getty Images via pinterest.com. Tobin Rote & Ron Mix [photo from 1963 AFL Championship Game], unattributed at pinterest.com. Keith Lincoln [photo from 1963 AFL Championship Game], unattributed at pinterest.com. Lance Alworth [photo from 1963], photo by Focus On Sport/Getty Images via gettyimages.ca. San Diego Chargers 1963 helmet, from helmet hut.com. Ernie Ladd [photo from 1963], unattributed at bleacherreport.com. Earl Faison [1962 Fleer card], from psacard.com. Dick Harris [1962 Fleer card], from amazon.com. John Hadl [photo from 1965], photo by Neil Leifer/Getty Images via gettyimages.com. Chargers patch circa 1960s from ebay.com.

Offensive stats leaders on map page… Tobin Rote (Chargers) [photo from 1964], unattributed at talesfromtheamericanfootballleague.com. George Blanda (Oilers) [photo circa 1964], unattributed at pinterest.com. Len Dawson (Chiefs) [1964 Topps card], from cardboardconnection.com. Clem Daniels (Raiders) [photo circa 1964], photo from raiders.com. Cookie Gilchrist (Bills) [photo from 1964], unattributed at pinterest.ie. Art Powell (Raiders) [photo circa 1965], unattributed at fs64sports.blogspot.com.

Thanks to all at the following links
-Blank map by anonymous US federal government employee, at File:StatesU.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Thanks to Sportslogos.net for 1960-era AFL team logos.
-Thanks to the contributors at pro-football-reference.com.
-Thanks to the contributors at AFL 1963 season (en.wikipedia.org).
-Thanks to the Coffin Corner newsletter, for this pdf, profootballresearchers.org/archives/Website_Files/Coffin_Corner/13-04-430.pdf [AFL attendance by team 1960-69] .
Special thanks to Tim Brulia, Bill Schaefer and Rob Holecko of The Gridiron Uniform Database, for giving billsportsmaps.com the permission to use football uniforms illustrations from Gridiron Uniform Database {GUD}.

January 14, 2021

Italy: Serie A, 2020-21 season – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in 1st-Division [current clubs] & All-time Italian Titles list.

Filed under: Italy — admin @ 9:08 pm

italy_2020-21_serie-a_location-maps_w-seasons-in-1st-div_italian-titles-list_post_d_.gif
Italy: 2020-21 Serie A – Location-maps, with 2 charts: Seasons-in 1st-Division [current clubs] & All-time Italian Titles list



By Bill Turianski on the 15th of January 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2020-21 Serie A (en.wikipedia.org).
-Serie A page at WorldFootball.net.
-Table, fixtures, results, stats, etc…Serie A/summary (soccerway.com).
-English-speaking coverage of Italian football…Forza Italian football.com.

The map page has a location-map of 2020-21 Serie A on the left-hand side.
The location-map features each club’s home kit [2020-21]. The map also shows the 20 Regions of Italy. And the map also shows the 11 largest cities in Italy (2019 metropolitan-area figures) {Metropolitan cities of Italy}. The cities’ population figures can be seen at the top of the location-map.

The centre of the map page has a map showing current Serie A representation by Region.
Of the 20 Regions of Italy, 11 have clubs in Serie A currently. The most-represented regions have 3 clubs each: Lombardia, Liguria, and Emilia-Romagna. Below is the full list of current Serie A clubs, by region…
Lombardia (aka Lombardy): 3 clubs…featuring Atalanta, and two Milan-based clubs: Internazionale, and Milan (note: there were 4 clubs from Lombardia in Serie A recently, but Brescia were relegated in 2020).
Liguria: 3 clubs…featuring two Genoa-based clubs: Genoa and Sampdoria, plus the newly-promoted Spezia, who are making their Serie A debut.
Emilia-Romagna: 3 clubs…featuring Bologna, Parma, and Sassuolo (note: there were 4 clubs from Emilia-Romagna in Serie A recently, but SPAL were relegated in 2020).
Piemonte (aka Piedmont): 2 clubs…both from Turin [Torino]: Juventus, and Torino.
Lazio: 2 clubs…both from Rome: Roma, and Lazio.
Campania: 2 clubs…Napoli [of Naples], and newly-promoted Benevento, who are located 31 miles (50 km) NE of Naples, and who are playing in only their second season of Serie A (their first was in 2017-18).
Tuscany: 1 club…Fiorentina [of Florence].
Sardinia: 1 club…Cagliari.
Friuli-Venezia Guilia: 1 club…Udinese [of Udine].
Veneto: 1 club…Hellas Verona.
Calabria: 1 club…the newly-promoted Crotone, who are playing in only their third season of Serie A (their first two top-flight seasons were from 2016 to ’18).

The right-hand side of the map page has 2 charts.
The top chart shows the 20 clubs’ total seasons in Serie A, with consecutive top-flight seasons also listed. The other chart is the All-time Italian titles list (1898-1915; 1920-43; 1947-2020).



___
Thanks to all at the links below…
Sources:
-Blank map of Italy by TUBS, at File:Italy provincial location map.svg.
-Blank map of Italy’s Regions by Gigillo83 at File:Italian regions white (with new provinces).svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Populations of Italian cities’ metro-areas from Metropolitan cities of Italy (en.wikipedia.org).
-Seasons in Italian 1st division: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serie_A#Seasons_in_Serie_A; it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serie_A#Le_squadre.
-General info, crests, kit illustrations, from 2020-21 Serie A (en.wikipedia.org).

January 5, 2021

2020-21 FA Cup, 3rd Round: Location-map, with fixtures; with attendances from the previous season./+ Illustration for Marine AFC: The second-ever 8th-level club to advance to the FA Cup 3rd Round.

Filed under: >2020-21 FA Cup — admin @ 9:36 pm

2020-21_fa-cup_3rd-round_map_w-fixtures_post_d_.gif
2020-21 FA Cup, 3rd Round: location-map, with fixtures; with attendances from the previous season



By Bill Turianski on the 5th of January 2021; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-The competition…FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-BBC’s page on the competition…bbc.com/fa-cup.

Four non-League teams have qualified this season for the FA Cup 3rd Round…Boreham Wood (5th division), Chorley (5th division), Marine (8th level), Stockport County (5th division). That’s up from 2 non-League teams, as it was in each of the previous two seasons. In 2017-18, actually, zero non-League teams qualified for the 3rd round. The record number of non-League teams qualifying for the 3rd round is 8 teams, which was achieved in 2008-09 (those 8 teams were…Barrow, Blyth Spartans, Eastwood Town, Forest Green Rovers, Histon, Kettering Town, Kidderminster Harriers, Torquay United).

It has been 42 years now, since the 5th division was established in 1979-80 (as the Alliance Premier League/now called the National League). This lead to the re-organization of English non-League football, into the English football pyramid, with a whole set of feeder-leagues sending promoted sides up towards the 5th tier, and of course, to the Football League starting at the 4th tier. (Automatic promotion from the 5th tier to the 4th division of the Football League was finally instituted 7 years later, in 1986-87.) And in that time (42 seasons), the average number of teams from non-League football that have made it into the FA Cup 3rd Round has been between 3.1 and 3.4 teams per season.

Below is a chart I put together, with figures from FA Cup Factfile {at twitter.com/[@FACupFactfile]}. The bar-graph chart shows the total number of non-League clubs which have qualified for the 3rd Round of the FA Cup, each season since 1979-80.
fa-cup_3rd-round_number-of-teams_from-non-league_that-qualified_graph_1980-2021_42-seasons_b_.gif
{Data from from FA Cup Factfile at twitter.com/[@FACupFactfile].}



    Marine AFC: Marine becomes only the second-ever 8th-level club to advance to the FA Cup 3rd Round…

Marine AFC, who play in the 8th-level Northern Premier League Division One North West, are located in Crosby, Merseyside (which is 6 miles (10 km) north of Liverpool). The club was formed in 1894 by a group of local businessmen and former college students. Marine AFC takes its name from the Marine Hotel on the River Mersey sea front at Waterloo, 7 miles to the north of Liverpool city centre, where club founders met. The club’s colors are White-and-Black, but the team are currently playing in Pale-Gold-and-Black halves. The club’s tiny Rossett Park has capacity of 3,145 (with only 389 seated). Marine have played at Rossett Park since 1903. Rossett Park is bordered by row housing on all 4 sides, with houses’ back gardens looking directly onto the pitch on one of the long sides. On that side, the houses’ address-numbers are posted on the tall nets that separate the back gardens from the playing field. This is so because when a game ball inevitably flies into a back garden, the player sent to retrieve the ball knows which house to go to, to get the ball back {see this photo}. The other long side features only a very thin uncovered terracing that is two just two-persons-deep. The Main Stand/clubhouse sits behind one of the goals, and is the only seated area in the ground.

Prior to the pandemic, Marine were averaging 448 per game, which is pretty decent for an 8th-tier side, and that figure was second-best in their league, at about 150 above the median figure {source: nonleaguematters.co.uk}.

In 1979-80, Marine joined the Northern Premier League (which was back then a 6th-level league, and which is today a 7th-level league). Marine were a Northern Premier League club for 40 seasons (1979-80 to 2018-19). Marine had a heyday in the mid-1990s. It was during this era that Marine first reached the FA Cup 3rd round – in 1993-94. Then Marine won the league title in back-to-back seasons, but both times they were denied promotion to the Conference (the 5th division), due to their ground being insufficient (too small). This happened in 1993-94 and in 1994-95. (Rossett Park cannot be expanded, because of the housing that fully borders the ground.) The next 23 seasons saw Marine finish in the lower half of the Northern Premier table 12 times; their best finish in this time period was in 3rd place in 2005-06 {source: fchd.info/MARINE}. Their four decades-long spell in the Northern Premier came to an end in 2018-19.

In September 2018, when Marine were stuck near the bottom of the table, former Chester FC manager Neil Young was hired as Marine’s new manager {see photo and captions below}. At the close of 2018-19, Marine were relegated to the Northern PL D-1 North West; Neil Young stayed on as manager. In 2019-20, now in the 8th tier, Marine were doing well, and were in 3rd place in mid-March when the season was stopped due to the coronavirus pandemic. Currently [5 Jan 2021], Marine are in 6th place, 7 points off first place, with a couple games in hand.

Marine are only the second 8th-level club to have qualified for the FA Cup 3rd Round.
(The 8th level was instituted in 2004-05 {see this}. The first 8th-tier club to qualify for the FA Cup 3rd Round was Chasetown FC, of Staffordshire, in 2007-08.)

Marine won 5 matches, to advance to the 1st Round…
•Marine beat Barnoldswick Town (9th level), in the Preliminary Round.
•Marine beat Frickley Athletic (8th level), away, in the 1st QR.
•Marine beat Runcorn Linnets (8th level), away, on penalties, in the 2nd QR.
•Marine beat Nantwich Town (7th level), in the 3QR.
•Marine beat Chester (6th level), away, in the 4th QR.

•In the FA Cup 1st Round, in early November 2020, Marine beat a club 4 League-levels and 90 league-places above them: Colchester United, of League Two.
(Marine beat them 1-1/aet/5-4 on penalties.) {You can see an illustration I made for that, here.}

•Then in the 2nd Round, in late November 2020, Marine beat a club 2 league-levels and 43 league-places above them: Havant & Waterlooville, of the National League South.
(Marine beat them 1-0, scoring in the 120th minute of aet; see photos, screenshots, and captions below.) The goal that sent Marine into the lofty reaches of the FA Cup 3rd Round was scored by 33-year-old team captain Niall Cummins. In the 120th minute, MF James Barrigan sent a free kick towards the box. The free kick arced across the goal-mouth, bouncing near the right goal post. There the ball was headed back towards the goal-mouth by DF Anthony Miley. The ball reached near the left post, where FW Niall Cummins dived low, to volley the ball into the net. Cummins later admitted that he dove blind towards the ball, and it hit his back, then went into the net. {Here is the goal and the celebration afterwards (from twitter.com/[@DomerSaverage]).} {Here is a more visible replay of the goal [you can see the ball does go off of Cummins' back to score], from bbc.com/sport.} In celebration, some of the fans watching from the neighboring houses’ back gardens almost fell off the fences and trees they were perched on. Then, after the on-pitch celebrations, the squad sent the goalkeeper Bayleigh Passant out ’round to the corner store, to buy some lager to celebrate the win {see this tweet, from twitter.com/[@TheAnfieldWrap]}. {Here are some more shots from Rossett Park that evening, from twitter.com/[@mdarlington].}



-Here is an nice article, from the Liverpool Echo, on Marine’s 2nd round win, Marine given day of dreams as financial figures show power of FA Cup (by Sam Carroll on 29 November 2020, at liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport).

-Here is the match report at Marine AFC official site, Match Report: Marine 1-0 Havant & Waterlooville (AET) (from marinefc.com).


Now, for the 3rd round, Marine have been drawn to play Premier League giants Tottenham Hotspur, at Rossett Park in Crosby, Merseyside. It will be the biggest mismatch in FA Cup history: the two clubs are 7 League-levels and 161-League-places apart. The match will be at 5 pm (12 pm ET), on Sunday the 10th of January. The match will be televised on the BBC in the UK.

Below: Marine AFC: the second-ever 8th-tier club to make it to the FA Cup 3rd Round…
marine-afc_2020-21-fa-cup-2nd-round_win-over-havant-and-waterlooville_rossett-park_neil-young_niall-cummins_t_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Photo of Marine’s home ground, Rossett Park, from liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport. Neil Young (Marine AFC manager), photo from marinefc.com. Main Stand at Rossett Park, photo by the Wycombe Wanderer at footygrounds.blogspot.com/2015/10/marine-rossett-park. Teams lined up at centre-circle before match, photo by Paul Greenwood/Rex via footballfrenzied.com. Screenshots (2) of Marine’s winning goal in the 120th minute, from video uploaded by The Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com. Screenshot of Niall Cummins celebrating the goal, from video uploaded by hawksfconline at youtube.com. Niall Cummins celebrates, photo by Kevin Warburton/A Moment in Sport/ProSports/Rex/Shutterstock via theguardian.com/football. Marine players celebrate with champagne at the centre-circle, photo by Paul Greenwood/Rex via dailymail.co.uk/sport/football.



___
Sources…
Thanks to all, at the links below…
-Blank map of English Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Counties, by Nilfanion, at File:English metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties 2010.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.
-Fixtures list: screenshot from bbc.com/fa-cup.
-Data for graph, from FA Cup Factfile.
Attendance figures…
-European-Football-Statistics.co.uk (2019-20 average attendances for the Premier League [1st division] and the Football League [2nd, 3rd, and 4th divisions].)
-nonleaguematters.co.uk. (2019-20 average attendances for all non-League clubs on the map, from the 5th division to the 8th division.)

December 24, 2020

Scotland national team – starting line-up from match which clinched their qualification for the UEFA Euro 2020 competition – from 12 November 2020: Serbia 1-1 Scotland (Scotland wins 5-4 on penalties). Scotland lineup & substitutions profiled.

Filed under: Scotland — admin @ 4:15 pm

By Bill Turianski on 24 December 2020; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-Scottishfa.co.uk.
-Scotland national football team (en.wikipedia.org).
-Marshall save ends Scotland’s long wait as they pip Serbia to Euro 2020 finals (by Louise Taylor on 12 November 2020 at theguardian.com/football).





UEFA Euro 2020 qualification, 12 November 2020: Play-offs Path C, Final.
Stadion Rajko Mitić, Belgrade, Serbia.
Serbia 1-1 Scotland (Scotland wins 5-4 on penalties)…
uefa-euro-qualifying2020_scotland-beats-serbia_on-penalties_12-nov-2020_ryan-christie_david-marshall_r-christie_l-griffiths_c-mcgregor_s-mctominay_o-mcburnie_k-mclean_e_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – 2 screenshots from video uploaded by Scotland National Team at
youtube.com. David Marshall makes game-winning penalty save, photo by Novak Djurovic/PA via theguardian.com/football. Screenshot of image of box-score of match, from en.wikipedia.org//UEFA_Euro_2020_qualifying_play-offs#Serbia_v_Scotland. David Marshall making the match-winning save, photo from twitter.com/[@clydebankfc]. Close-up shot of David Marshall’s game-winning penalty save, from twitter.com/[@clydebankfc]. Scotland players celebrate, photo by SNS Group via dailymail.co.uk/sport. Ryan Christie, photo by Ken Macpherson at inverness-courier.co.uk. Leigh Griffiths, screenshot of video from dailyrecord.co.uk/sport. Callum McGregor, photo by Getty Images via dailymail.co.um/sport. Scott McTominay, photo by @ScottishFA via scottishsupporters.net. Oli McBurnie, photo by Getty Images via thescottishsun.co.uk/sport. Kenny McLean, photo by SNS Group via dailyrecord.co.uk/sport.



Please note: by clicking on the illustration below, you can place it in an enlargeable separate page.

    Scotland national team – Squad that won qualification for UEFA Euro 2020
    Starting line-up (plus substitutions) from match which clinched their qualification for the UEFA Euro 2020 competition….
    12 November 2020, in Belgrade, Serbia: Serbia 1-1 Scotland, aet (5-4 to Scotland on penalties).

scotland_national-team_uefa-euro-2020-qualifying_steve-clark_squad-that-qualified_12-nov-2020_serbia-1_1-scotland_scotland-wins-on-penalties-5-4_s_.gif
Photo and Image credits above -
Illustration of Scotland kits (2020), from en.wikipedia.org/Scotland_national_football_team. 2020 Scotland jersey, photo from soccerpro.com. Blank map of United Kingdom, by Daniel Dalet at d-maps.com. Blank map of Scotland, by: Eric Gaba, NordNordWest, Uwe Dedering at File:Scotland relief location map.jpg. Steve Clarke talking to the Scotland squad prior to extra time during the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifier between Serbia and Scotland at the Stadion Rajko Mitic on November 12, 2020, in Belgrade, Serbia, photo by Nikola Krstic/SNS Group via scotsman.com/sport/football. Steve Clarke, photo by Craig Williamson/SNS via thetimes.co.uk.
Squad…
Goalkeeper…David Marshall (Derby County), photo unattributed at derbycounty.news.
Defenders…Scott McTominay (Manchester Utd), photo by Getty Images via manchestereveningnews.co.uk/sport. Declan Gallagher (Motherwell), photo unattributed at scotsman.com/sport. Kieran Tierney (Arsenal), photo from premierleague.com/news.
Midfielders/Defensive Midfielders…Stephen O’Donnell (Motherwell), photo by Ross MacDonald / SNS Group / Getty Images via gettyimages.co.uk. Ryan Jack (Rangers), photo unattributed at heraldscotland.com/sport. Callum McGregor (Celtic), photo from SNS Group via glasgowlive.co.uk/sport/football. Andrew Robertson (Liverpool), photo from AFP via sports.ndtv.com.
Attacking Midfielders and Forwards…Lyndon Banks (QPR), photo by Andy Rowland / PRiME Media Images/Alamy Live News at alamy.com. John McGinn (Aston Villa), photo by Getty Images via leeds-live.co.uk/sport. Ryan Christie (Celtic), photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images via 90min.com. Andrew Robertson, photo from premierleague.com/news.
Substitutions...Callum Paterson (Sheffield Wednesday), photo from examinerlive.co.uk/sport. Leigh Griffiths (Celtic), photo by PA via thescottishsun.co.uk/sport. Kenny McLean (Norwich City), photo from twitter.com/[@NorwichCityFC]. Oli McBurnie (Sheffield United), photo unattributed at theathletic.com.



December 7, 2020

Germany: 2020-21 Bundesliga – Location-maps, with Seasons-in-1st-Division for the current 18 clubs & All-time German Titles list./+ Illustrations for the 18 venues in 2020-21 Bundesliga.

Filed under: Germany — admin @ 5:55 pm

germany-bundesliga_2020-21_location-map-of-the-18-clubs_attendance_titles_seasons-in-1st-div_post_d_.gif
Germany: 2020-21 Bundesliga – Location-maps, with Seasons-in-1st-Division for the current 18 clubs & All-time German Titles list

By Bill Turianski on 7 December 2020; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.

Links…
-2020-21 Bundesliga (en.wikipedia.org).
-World Football.net site…worldfootball.net/bundesliga.
-Official site of Bundesliga (English)…bundesliga.com/en/bundesliga.
-Deutsche Welle [in English]…DW/en/sports.



germany-2020-21-bundesliga_map_f_.gif
Credits above – Location-map by Bill Turianski. Blank map of Germany, by NordNordWest at File:Germany location map.svg (Wikimedia Commons).

    2020-21 German Bundesliga venues – the home stadiums of the 18 current Bundesliga clubs
    (Shown in order of the league table, from 8 December 2020 (after 10 weeks of the season)…

1st place, Bayern Munich: Allianz Arena, in Munich, Bavaria.
bayern-munich_allianz-arena_f_.gif
Photo credits above – Diego Delso at File:Allianz Arena, Múnich, Alemania, 2013-02-11, DD 16.JPG (commons.wikimedia.org). Inset aerial photo, by Shutterstock via techwireasia.com.

2nd place, Bayer Leverkusen: BayArena, in Leverkusen [Greater Cologne], North Rhine-Westphalia (part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region).
bayer-leverkusen_bayarena_d_.gif
Photo credit above – Arne Müseler at File:Bayarena Leverkusen 2020.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).

3rd place, RB Leipzig: Red Bull Arena, in Leipzig, Saxony.
rb-leipzig_red-bull-arena_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Steffen Schellhorn/Imago via rblive.de/leipzig-stadion.




4th place, Borussia Dortmund: Westfalenstadion [aka Signal-Iduna Park], in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia (part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region).
borussia-dortmund_westfalenstadion_aka-signal-iduna-park_d_.gif
Photo credit above – screenshot of video image uploaded by Borussia Dortmund at youtube.com.

5th place, VfL Wolfsburg: Volkswagen Arena, in Wolfsburg, Lower Saxony.
wolfsburg_volkswagen-arena_b_.gif

Photo credit above – signify.com.

6th place, Union Berlin: Stadion An der Alten Försterei, in Köpenick, south-eastern Berlin.
union-berlin_stadion-an-der-alten-forsterei_d_.gif
Photo credit above – Ralf Roletschek at Datei:19-08-17-Stadion-an-der-alten-Foersterei-DJI 0275.jpg (de.wikipedia.org).

7th place, Borussia Mönchengladbach: Borussia-Park, in Mönchengladbach, North Rhine-Westphalia (part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region).
monchengladbach_borussia-park_d_.gif
Photo credit above – nuernbergluftbild.de/luftbilder/[stadion-borussia-park-moenchengladbach].





8th place, VfL Stuttgart: Mercedes-Benz Arena, in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg.
/stuttgart_mercedes-benz-arena_b_.gif
Photo credit above – Carsten Reidl via tagblatt.de

9th place, Eintracht Frankfurt: Waldstadion [aka Deutche Bank Park], in Frankfurt am Main, Hesse.
eintracht-frankfurt_waldstadion_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at br.pinterest.com.

10th place, Hoffenheim: Rhine-Neckar Arena, in Sinsheim, in the Rhine-Neckar metro-region in Baden-Württemberg.
hoffenheim_rhein-neckar-arena_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at usports.in.

11th place, FC Augsburg: Augsburg Arena [aka WWK Arena], in Augsburg, Swabia, Bavaria.
augsburg_augsburg-park_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Ulrich Wagner/Archivfoto via augsburger-allgemeine.de/sport.





12th place, Hertha Berlin: Olympiastadion, in the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf district of the city-state of Berlin - the home of Hertha, Berliner Sport-Club.
hertha-berlin_olympiastadion_c_.gif
Photo credit above – stadionbetreiber.de/[berlin-olympiastadion].

13th place, Werder Bremen: Weser-Stadion, in Bremen, Free Hanseatic City of Bremen (city-state).
hwerder-bremen_weser-stadion_b_.gif
Photo credit above – bremen.eu/weser-stadium.

14th place, Freiburg: Schwarzwald-Stadion, in Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg.
freiburg_shwarzwald-stadion_b_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot of video uploaded by Google Earth Stadium Flights at youtube.com.

15th place, FC Köln: Rhein Energie Stadion in Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia (part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region).
koln_rhein-energie-stadion_b_.gif
Photo credit above – rundschau-online.de.





16th place, Arminia Bielefeld: Bielefelder Alm, in Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia.
arminia-bielefeld_bielefelder-alm_b_.gif
Photo credit above – arminia-bielefeld.de.

17th place, Mainz 05: Opel Arena, in Mainz, Greater Frankfurt, Rhineland-Palatinate.
mainz-05_opel-arena_c_.gif
Photo credit above – allgemeine-zeitung.de.

Last place, Schalke 04: Veltins-Arena, in Gelsenkirchen, North Rhine-Westphalia (part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region).
schalke-04_veltins-arena_b_.gif
Photo credit above – PA via offthepitch.com.

___
Thanks to all at the following links
-Blank map of Germany, by NordNordWest at File:Germany location map.svg (Wikimedia Commons).
-Map with Federal States of Germany from States of Germany (en.wikipedia.org).
-14 largest German cities from List of cities in Germany by population (en.wikipedia.org).

November 25, 2020

2020-21 FA Cup, 2nd Round: location-map, with fixtures; with attendances from the previous season./+ Illustration for Marine AFC, who had the biggest upset in the 1st Round (8th-level side Marine beats 4th-level side Colchester United [90 league places and 4 league-levels difference].)

Filed under: >2020-21 FA Cup — admin @ 10:00 pm

http://billsportsmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/2020-21_fa-cup_2nd-round_map_w-fixtures_post_d_.gif
2020-21 FA Cup, 2nd Round: location-map, with fixtures; with attendances from the previous season



By Bill Turianski on the 25th of November 2020; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-The competition…FA Cup (en.wikipedia.org).
-BBC’s page on the competition…bbc.com/fa-cup.

FA Cup Second Round matches are set for Friday the 27th through Monday the 30th of November.
But before that, there is one 1st round match still to be played: Barrow AFC versus AFC Wimbledon, on Thursday the 26th of November. (That match, which had been scheduled for the 7th of November, had been postponed due to several AFC Wimbledon players being tested positive for COVID-19.) I will adjust the map page accordingly, following the outcome of that match.

    The biggest Cup-upset in 2020-21 FA Cup 1st Round…
    Marine AFC (8th level) beats Colchester United (4th division)…

Marine are from Crosby in Merseyside, 6 miles (by road) north of Liverpool. Marine are an 8th-level club playing in the Northern Premier League Division One North West. On Saturday the 7th of November, Marine traveled down to Essex to face 4th-division side Colchester United. In the 22nd minute, Marine DF Anthony Miley scored, on a rebound off the post from a free kick {see photos and captions below}. In the 64th minute, Colchester equalised with a goal from their captain, MF Harry Pell. At the final whistle, the match remained at 1-1. So it went to aet, and after that, it went to penalties. All 5 Marine players converted their penalty shots {see them below}. And so Marine AFC beat a club 4 League-levels and 90 League-places above them. In the Second Round, Marine have been drawn to play versus 6th-tier side Havant & Waterlooville, at their Rossett Park in Crosby. That match will be the late game on Sunday the 29th, and it will be televised. {Televised matches.}
marine-afc_2020-21-fa-cup-1st-round_win-over-colchester-utd_rossett-park_neil-young_t_.gif
Photo and Image credits above – Photo of Marine’s home ground, Rossett Park, from liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport. Neil Young (Marine AFC manager), photo from marinefc.com. Modified badge of Marin AFC (old-gold background), from marinefc.com/video. Screenshot of Anthony Miley goal, from video uploaded by The Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com. Photo of Marine players congratulating Anthony Miley after his goal in FA Cup, photo unattributed at bbc.com/sport. Screenshot of Michael Howard scoring the winning penalty kick, from video uploaded by The Emirates FA Cup at youtube.com. Photo of Michael Howard scoring winning penalty kick, by Ray Lawrence/TGS Photo/Rex via dailymail.co.uk. Marine players celebrate after penalty shootout win over Colchester, photo from bbc.com/sport/live/football. Anthony Miley, photo frommarinefc.com. Momodou Touray, photo from clwbpeldroed.org/2019/09/03/momodou-touray-barry-town-cymru-premier. Adam Hughes, photo from Marine FC via theanglingrev.com. Neil Kengnie, photo by Susan Nugent at twitter.com/[@SusanNugent2]. David Raven, photo by Susan Nugent at twitter.com/[@SusanNugent2]. Michael Howard, photo from marinefc.com.


___
Sources…
Thanks to all, at the links below…
-Blank map of English Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Counties, by Nilfanion, at File:English metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties 2010.svg (commons.wikimedia.org).
-Blank relief map of Greater London, by Nilfanion (using UK Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater London UK relief location map.jpg.
-Blank relief map of Greater Manchester, by Nilfanion (using Ordnance Survey data), at File:Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg.
-Fixtures list: screenshot from bbc.com/fa-cup.
Attendance figures…
-European-Football-Statistics.co.uk (2019-20 average attendances for the 3rd and 4th division.)
-nonleaguematters.co.uk. (2019-20 average attendances for all non-League clubs on the map, from the 5th division to the 8th division.)

November 13, 2020

2020 Copa Libertadores: map of Final Stages (16 teams)./+ Illustrations for 2020 Libertadores Round of 16 venues – all sixteen of the Round-of-16 stadiums.

Filed under: Copa Libertadores — admin @ 8:36 pm

conmebol_copa-libertadores_2020_location-map_final-stages_16-teams_post_c_.gif
2020 Copa Libertadores: map of Final Stages (16 teams)

By Bill Turianski on the 13th of November 2020; twitter.com/billsportsmaps.
Links…
-2020 Copa Libertadores/Final Stages (en.wikipedia.org).
-Summary – CONMEBOL Libertadores – Final Stages [2020] (soccerway.com).




The Round of 16
The first legs of the 2020 Copa Libertadores Round of 16 will be played on the 24th, 25th, and 26th of November {click on the links above for the fixtures}.

Brazil led with six teams in the final 16, followed by Argentina and Ecuador with three teams each, Paraguay with two teams, and Bolivia and Uruguay with one team each. The big surprises here were A) the fact that a Bolivian team advanced to the round of 16 (Jorge Wilstermann), and B) that for the first time ever, three Ecuadorian teams have made it to the round of 16. Those three teams from Ecuador are: LDU Quito (who won the Libertadores title in 2008), Independiente del Valle (who were a Libertadores finalist in 2016), and newcomers Delfín (who have now advanced to the round of 16 in only their 3rd-ever Libertadores appearance). You can see the stadiums of these three teams, as well as all the others, below.

(Teams/venues below listed by Seeds {2020 Libertadores Round of 16/Qualified teams/seeds {en.wikipedia.org}.)

    Below: 2020 Libertadores Round of 16 venues – all 16 clubs’ stadiums…

Seed #1: Palmeiras (Brazil) – Allianz Parque [aka Palestra Itália Arena], in São Paulo, Brazil.
palmeiras_allianz-parque_sao-paulo-brazil_d_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by One Man Wolfpack at youtube.com.

Seed #2: Santos (Brazil) – Vila Belmiro (aka Estádio Urbano Caldeira), in Santos, São Paulo state, Brazil.
santos-fc_vila-belmiro_santos-brazil_h_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by Helder Almeida at youtube.com.

Seed #3: Flamengo (Brazil) – Maracanã [aka Estádio Jornalista Mário Filho], in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
flamengo_maracana_rio-de-janeiro-brazil_b_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by Discovery Channel Southeast Asia at youtube.com.

Seed #4: Club Nacional (Uruguay) – Gran Parque Central, in Montevideo, Uruguay.
club-nacional_gran-parque-central_montevideo-uruguay_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at br.pinterest.com.




Seed #5: Boca Juniors (Argentina) – La Bombonera (‘the Chocolate Box’), in La Boca district of Buenos Aires FD, Argentina.
boca-juniors_la-bombonera_buenos-aires-argentina_d_.gif
Photo credit above – worldstrides.com.

Seed #6: River Plate (Argentina) – El Monumental, in the Belgrano district of Buenos Aires FD, Argentina.
river-plate_el-monumental_buenos-aires-argentina_c_.gif
Photo credit above – Fulviusbsas at File:RiverPlateStadium.jpg (commons.wikimedia.org).

Seed #7: Grêmio (Brazil) – Arena do Grêmio, in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.
gremio_arena-do-gremio_port-alegre-brazil_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at deville.com.br/blog.

Seed #8: CD Jorge Wilstermann (Bolivia) – Estadio Sudamericano Félix Capriles, in Cochabamba, Bolivia.
wilstermann_estadio-felix-capriles_cochacambra-bolivia_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at regupol.com.




Seed #9: Racing (Argentina) – El Cilindro, in Avellaneda, Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina.
racing_el-cilindro_avelleneda-greater-buenos-aires-argentina_b_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at radiomitre.cienradios.com/cilindro-avellaneda-festeja-68-anos-vida.

Seed #10: Club Guaraní (Paraguay) – Estadio Rogelio Livieres, in Asunción, Paraguay.
guarani_estadio-rogelio-s-livieres_asuncion-paraguay_b_.gif
Photo credit above – File photo from abc.com.py/deportes.

Seed #11: Independiente del Valle (Ecuador) – Estadio Rumiñahui, in Sangolquí, Ecuador
independiente-del-vallee_estadio-ruminahui_sangolqui-greater-quito-ecuador_b_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot of photo by Daniel Corella [March 2019] at google.com/maps.

Seed #12: LDU [Quito] (Ecuador) – La Casa Blanca, in Quito, Ecuador.
du-quito_estadio-rodrigo-paz-delgado_quito-ecuador_c_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at m.facebook.com via skyscrapercity.com.




Seed#13: Athletico Paranaense (Brazil) – Arena da Baixada (aka Estádio Joaquim Américo), in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.
athletico-paranaense_arena-da-baixada_curitiba-parana-brazil_b_.gif
Image credit above – screenshot from video uploaded by Wassmansdorff at youtube.com.

Seed #14: Internacional (Brazil) – Estádio Beira-Rio, in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.
http://billsportsmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/internacional_estadio-beira-rio_porto-alegre-brazil_c_.gif
Photo credit above – unattributed at pinterest.com.

Seed #15: Delfín (Ecuador) – Estadio Joacay, in Manta, Ecuador.
delfin-sc_estadio-jocay_manta-ecuador_d_.gif
Photo credit above – eldiario.ec.

Seed #16: Libertad (Paraguay) – Tuyukuá, in Asunción, Paraguay.
libertad_tuyukua_asuncion-paraguay_b_.gif
Photo credit above – LN via hoy.com.py/deportes.
___
Thanks to all at the links below…
-Globe-map of South America by Luan at File:South America (orthographic projection).svg (en.wikipedia.org/[South America]).
-Blank map of South America by Anbans 585 at File:CONMEBOL laea location map without rivers.svg (en.wikipedia.org/[2018 Copa Libertadores]).
-2020 Copa Libertadores (en.wikipedia.org).
-Copa Libertadores 1960-2019 Club Histories (rsssf.com).
-Libertadores titles list {en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copa_Libertadores#Performances_by_club}.

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